Neil Gaiman

What other authors do Tolkien fans enjoy? Come on in and enter into a broadened conversation on the great literature of this and other times.

Postby mirkwood_maiden » Sat Jul 24, 2004 1:05 pm

woo - yey! I lurve 'the Sandman' too! ...tried to do a thready-thing once but barely anyone replied :roll: ah well...

Delirium rules! I simply love the Corinthian in "The Kindly Ones" - when he takes the eyes (not putting in too much detail incase I ending spoiling it for some) and Matthew goes "You're sick" - to which he replies "No. I am a visionary." - pure class! :o
User avatar
mirkwood_maiden
Shield Bearer

 
Posts: 143
Joined: Tue Feb 26, 2002 11:36 am
Top

Postby BT_Shire » Thu Jul 29, 2004 11:34 am

Gaiman is definitely one of my favorite writers. To be honest, I know him mostly from his work in comics. The only novel of his I read was American Gods, which I loved. I also read Stardust, but I consider Stardust a comic book since it was originally published as an illustrated story by DC Comics. If you haven't read the illustrated version, I highly recommend it!

Sandman is one of the finest stories ever, in comics or in any other format. As an aside, if you like Gaiman's comics, you might want to check out Alan Moore's work. Moore's work sort of set the stage for the artistic, serious work Gaiman did in the comic industry. Particularly, check out Watchmen, V for Vendetta, Swamp Thing, and From Hell.
User avatar
BT_Shire
Petitioner to the Council
 
Posts: 10
Joined: Mon Jul 26, 2004 9:39 pm
Top

Postby SilverScribe » Thu Jan 06, 2005 1:26 pm

Well, The_Fool is probably going to jump for joy . . . I finally bought and read a Neil Gaiman novel - American Gods. :D

While it's not the most stunning piece of literature I've ever read, it certainly was well crafted. I loved the character of Shadow and I really liked the way Gaiman illustrated the vast difference yet the sameness of principles behind the creation and maintenance of the "old" Gods (Odin, Thor, Loki etc., etc.) and the "new" Gods (the techno-kid and his geeky cohorts). I wondered though, at the omission of one of history's most popular and certainly most prevalent gods - money, and that there was no representation of it. Unless I missed it . . . ah well.

I've since picked up Neverwhere, even though I've been warned that it's an earlier work and not nearly as smoothly written as American Gods. However, the description of the story and "the location" of it is certainly intriguing enough, though hardly original. Still, based on the wonderful ride I had with American Gods, I'm very interested to see how Gaiman will deal with the "alternate reality" material . . . ;)

So Foolish, ya happy now? :P

:D:D:D
User avatar
SilverScribe
Scribe, Wanderer, Warrior . . . Bard of Rhudaur and Herald of Manwe


 
Posts: 29663
Joined: Wed Mar 06, 2002 10:17 pm
Location: In the wild . . .
Top

Postby AlexSnitzel » Sun Jan 09, 2005 9:59 pm

Oh, a Neil Gaiman thread, very cool! :D

I'm a big fan, though unfortunately I've yet to read American Gods. But I've read and reread Neverwhere and Stardust and many of the pieces of Smoke and Mirrors. There is just something so extremely unique about his style. Very evocative language, especially in Stardust. I can't say how much I love Neverwhere... before Tolkien crossed my path, Neverwhere was "the book" in my life. ;) It's my prized possession, with his autograph on the front page with "Mind the Gap" written in trailing letters, and taped on the title page is a postcard that he sent me a few years ago. It has been a while since I've read it last... it may be time to pick it up again. :D
User avatar
AlexSnitzel
Ranger of the North

 
Posts: 3309
Joined: Thu Jul 01, 2004 10:44 pm
Location: Sunny South Carolina!
Top

Postby SilverScribe » Mon Jan 17, 2005 12:24 pm

Well, I've devoured Neverwhere as well, and I was fascinated and engaged through the whole thing.

While it's not as polished a work as American Gods, I still enjoyed it enough to want to continue, and check out Stardust, and Smoke and Mirrors. And the new one, with the girls name that I can't quite remember . . .

I doubt I'll ever look at the Sandman comics, but his books are quite interesting. Definitely not a bad read at all.

:D:D
User avatar
SilverScribe
Scribe, Wanderer, Warrior . . . Bard of Rhudaur and Herald of Manwe


 
Posts: 29663
Joined: Wed Mar 06, 2002 10:17 pm
Location: In the wild . . .
Top

Neverwhere, Neil is the best author....

Postby Merryx » Mon Feb 21, 2005 5:11 am

Neverwhere is absolutly fantastic! I love it, de Carabas, especially! :wink: he's cool
User avatar
Merryx
Petitioner to the Council
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Tue Nov 13, 2001 12:41 am
Top

Postby Luinnenion » Mon Feb 21, 2005 1:07 pm

Gaiman has written a script for a Beowulf movie that Robert Zemeckis will direct. It will be motion-capture, like The Polar Express.
User avatar
Luinnenion
Ranger of the North
 
Posts: 1553
Joined: Wed Oct 02, 2002 1:12 am
Top

Postby Ilyda » Tue Feb 22, 2005 7:27 pm

I found Neil Gaiman this past summer, completely by accident. I was trying to get out of the house for a couple of hours and retreated to Barnes and Noble. I was wandering around and found American Gods. I started reading, and it got to the point where I had to buy it. I finished it in two days. The ending haunted me for a few days beyond. I simply couldn't get it out of my head.

I've been trying to get Neverwhere since then. I put it on my Christmas list, but no, they decide to get me "practical stuff." Since when is enjoyment not practical? At least on some level. So I'm waiting a few weeks for the next break, when I'll probably go out and borrow it from the library or something like that.

I'll definitely be back here when I'm done with it. I loved American Gods. I agree with Scribbles that the writing was not spectacular (this coming from a poet, looking at both meaning and meter), but the subject was intriguing and the plot well-constructed. And that's really all that's needed.
User avatar
Ilyda
Ranger of the North

 
Posts: 1170
Joined: Fri Jun 25, 2004 11:41 am
Location: The Great Midwest
Top

Postby AlexSnitzel » Wed Feb 23, 2005 11:47 pm

Ilyda, find Neverwhere, as quickly as you can. ASAP. ;) :P

I discovered Neil Gaiman by wandering aimlessly through a bookstore and found Stardust, which completely enthralled me.
User avatar
AlexSnitzel
Ranger of the North

 
Posts: 3309
Joined: Thu Jul 01, 2004 10:44 pm
Location: Sunny South Carolina!
Top

Postby SilverScribe » Thu Feb 24, 2005 9:10 pm

I agree, Neverwhere is quite the ride . . . ;) even if it's not as polished a work as American Gods. Of course, it came before so . . .

I picked up Stardust today, but alas, won't be able to dive into it for a while, I have several books ahead of it. But I'm glad to hear it is "enthralling", that's pretty much what I thought of Neverwhere.

Having to wait to read it is okay though, the anticipation will only make the reading that much sweeter . . . ;)

:D:D:D
User avatar
SilverScribe
Scribe, Wanderer, Warrior . . . Bard of Rhudaur and Herald of Manwe


 
Posts: 29663
Joined: Wed Mar 06, 2002 10:17 pm
Location: In the wild . . .
Top

Postby AlexSnitzel » Mon Feb 28, 2005 12:54 pm

I'll be interested as to what you think of it SS. :) Stardust was my introduction to Neil Gaiman, so it holds a very dear place on my bookshelf, though I came to like Neverwhere more.

Incidentally, I'm working on a paper on Gaiman's "The Sea Change," which is one of my favorites of his.
User avatar
AlexSnitzel
Ranger of the North

 
Posts: 3309
Joined: Thu Jul 01, 2004 10:44 pm
Location: Sunny South Carolina!
Top

Postby SilverScribe » Mon Feb 28, 2005 10:54 pm

Please, call me Scribbles. ;)

I'll let you know how I find Stardust, for sure. If it's in the same vein as his other books, I'm quite sure I'll be entranced and delighted.

:D:D
User avatar
SilverScribe
Scribe, Wanderer, Warrior . . . Bard of Rhudaur and Herald of Manwe


 
Posts: 29663
Joined: Wed Mar 06, 2002 10:17 pm
Location: In the wild . . .
Top

1602

Postby Tomnoddy » Tue Mar 01, 2005 6:16 am

I read the Gaiman scripted '1602' at the weekend.

It follows Gaiman's fondness for transplanting characters into unusual environments by having Marvel superheroes as characters in a story set in Elizabethan Europe and America.
User avatar
Tomnoddy
Shield Bearer
 
Posts: 110
Joined: Sat Apr 06, 2002 7:14 am
Top

Postby SilverScribe » Wed Mar 30, 2005 9:00 pm

Well, it only took be a couple of hours to read Gaiman's "Stardust".

Meh. Simplistic and somewhat of a disappointment. Of course, it isn't helping that I'm reading his books in reverse order, I can certainly see where the boy has come FROM, but I'd hardly have voted Stardust the "best of" anything, even back in 1998 . . . ;)

I think I'll wait for his newest stuff now.

:D:D:D
User avatar
SilverScribe
Scribe, Wanderer, Warrior . . . Bard of Rhudaur and Herald of Manwe


 
Posts: 29663
Joined: Wed Mar 06, 2002 10:17 pm
Location: In the wild . . .
Top

Postby Ilyda » Sat Apr 02, 2005 4:51 pm

Well, I went to the University Bookstore this past week (the first of Spring Quarter) and finally got Neverwhere. Yay! I have to admit, I was really lazy during break and never got around to getting it. But my first day back was a pretty bad one, and I needed a book to cheer me up. Fortunately, I remembered I had been meaning to get Neverwhere for a while.

The story was pretty good. It didn't seem as well-crafted as American Gods, though. I can't quite explain it. American Gods was compelling and haunting. This story, especially the very end, was quite predictable. Still enjoyable, but not as good.
And I have a question. There seemed to be a few omissions on Gaiman's part in Neverwhere, but this one has been bothering me more than others. If you've read the story, please help: If Richard is supposed to be the "keeper of the key," then what happens to it? Wouldn't he still have it in the "real" world?

I'm waiting for Gaiman's next book (The Anansi Boys) to come out in September. I might find a couple of his others while I'm waiting, though. You never know! :wink:
User avatar
Ilyda
Ranger of the North

 
Posts: 1170
Joined: Fri Jun 25, 2004 11:41 am
Location: The Great Midwest
Top

Postby AinulindaleFBS » Sun Apr 03, 2005 10:14 am

Apparently no one has posted the cover to gaimans forthcoming novel, the quasi-sequel to American Gods (I don't see any way of podting an image here, my apologizs, so I am posting a link, just scroll down, it's large you won't miss is)

His new book is Anansi Boys, the cover Here

I gave loved everything Gaiman has ever come out with from his monumental Sandman comics, to Neverwhere, Stardust, Melinda, Coraline, American Gods, or Good Omens, his collaboration with Terry Pratchett.

Defintely one of fantasy's elite. Be sure to be on the lookout for his movie Mirrormask coming soon.



Fantasybookspot.com
User avatar
AinulindaleFBS
Citizen of Imladris
 
Posts: 21
Joined: Fri Mar 18, 2005 3:25 am
Top

Postby SilverScribe » Sun Apr 03, 2005 8:13 pm

Ilyda, I found Neverwhere not as polished a work as American Gods too. But you know, I think that's because Neverwhere was written before American Gods and shows progression from it, so Gaiman is getting better at his craft.

I mentioned in my previous post that my mistake was probably in reading Gaiman's works in reverse order, that is, from his most recent to his earliest instead of starting with his earlier works and reading forward in time, so to speak.

I thoroughly enjoyed Neverwhere, even if it wasn't as sophisticated a work as Americal Gods. Oh, and while I'm no expert, I think that the answer to your question might be that . . . Remember how his fiance could no longer really "see" him after he'd helped Door the first time? I think that he had already started to become part of Neverwhere, so if he came back into the normal world after being in Neverwhere, the key wouldn't be any more substantial in the real world than he was.

*shrugs* Well, that's my poor theory anyway . . . :D:D

Ah thank you AinulindaleFBS, I'm certainly looking forward to that new book . . . I'll have to keep an eye on my favourite bookstore . . .

:D
User avatar
SilverScribe
Scribe, Wanderer, Warrior . . . Bard of Rhudaur and Herald of Manwe


 
Posts: 29663
Joined: Wed Mar 06, 2002 10:17 pm
Location: In the wild . . .
Top

Postby AinulindaleFBS » Mon Apr 04, 2005 2:31 am

Ah thank you AinulindaleFBS, I'm certainly looking forward to that new book . . . I'll have to keep an eye on my favourite bookstore . . .



No problem, my pleasure:)

Just a observation, although Neverwhere was indeed written before Amerixan Gods, and it is witotu question not as large in scope or complexity, I don't think this indictive of Gaiman fine tuneing his craft with each succesive novel as much as it is Gaiman is of the ilK of writers who write differnt types of stories, and who is capable of doing so well. Neverwhere is a classic quest book, yes its in a dark urban setting, it really is a quest series with a Lewis Carroll twist to it, and that's all it was meant to be, and I have found i to be one of the better such novels. For an author to write a book such as that and to be successful (critically, I don't care about sales, most best-selling fantasy ranks among the works in the genre IMHO, ie Eddings, Jordan, Goodkind, Brooks etc) is a clear indication of the talent of Mr. Gaiman, and the strength of his prose (another such example would be Gene Wolfe's Wizard/Knight duology, where he uses classic elements but is a gifted author enough to make it a critical hit and worth reading unlike something mindless, like say Eragon). All of Gaiman's novels are vastly different thematicaly, and stylisticaly, and I think this is doen with purpose, not as a nexample of decline or improvement, as Gaiman has been a master since he wrote the Sandman comics, before he ever wrote a novel IMHO. Sadly enough I think those comics were better than a vast majority of published fanatsy novels at the same time, which is both a reflection of Gaiman's talent, and the the state of big publisher fantasy.


http://www.fantasybookspot.com
User avatar
AinulindaleFBS
Citizen of Imladris
 
Posts: 21
Joined: Fri Mar 18, 2005 3:25 am
Top

Postby Epor » Mon Apr 04, 2005 10:17 am

AinulindaleFBS wrote:Sadly enough I think those comics were better than a vast majority of published fanatsy novels at the same time, which is both a reflection of Gaiman's talent, and the the state of big publisher fantasy.


Maybe I misunderstand, but this seems like you're dissing comics/graphic novels as a medium? The Sandman is Gaiman's greatest achievement to date, although his novels are not bad either.

Bite the sacred apple
suck the poison
enjoy the taste
User avatar
Epor
Ranger of the North

 
Posts: 1764
Joined: Mon Mar 19, 2001 10:44 am
Top

Postby AinulindaleFBS » Mon Apr 04, 2005 10:38 am

Maybe I misunderstand, but this seems like you're dissing comics/graphic novels as a medium? The Sandman is Gaiman's greatest achievement to date, although his novels are not bad either.


Nothing could be farther from the truth, however if I were I would hardly be in the minority. I have some 3700 fantasy/Sci-fi novels I have more comics than I have fantasy novels:) I don't think it's a leap of faith to expect a standard sized novel of specualtive fiction to have more merit or substance than a a single issue of any comic book. My statement above suggests that I feel otherwise regarding Gaiman's Sandman work compared to many novels released at the same time. For example I believe Alan Moore, Dave Lapham, Grant Morrison,Warren Ellis, Frank Miller, put more substance in one issue of many of there comic works that I find in a Terry Goodkind novel:) I believe Moore's Watchemen, and Gaiman's Sandman makes Terry Brook's Shananra series look sophmoric.


Fantasybookspot
User avatar
AinulindaleFBS
Citizen of Imladris
 
Posts: 21
Joined: Fri Mar 18, 2005 3:25 am
Top

Postby Epor » Mon Apr 04, 2005 10:57 am

I don't think it's a leap of faith to expect a standard sized novel of specualtive fiction to have more merit or substance than a a single issue of any comic book.


Yeah, I agree with this, but then it's hardly surprising when one is 30 pages (more or less) and the other 500. :)

In general, due to the way comics are usually made, they tend to be more commercialized and constrained by format, etc. Some rise above these problems though, and there is no limit to how good a comic can be.

Bite the sacred apple
suck the poison
enjoy the taste
User avatar
Epor
Ranger of the North

 
Posts: 1764
Joined: Mon Mar 19, 2001 10:44 am
Top

Postby SilverScribe » Mon Apr 04, 2005 8:05 pm

I lost my interest in comic books back sometime after graduating High School, and have just never been able to get back into them since.

But that doesn't mean I think comic books aren't worth reading, just that they're not my particular cup of tea any more. A lot of people have tried to convince me to pick up Gaiman's Sandman, but meh, it just doesn't crank the windmill of my interest enough to make me actually go out and do it.

I agree that Gaiman's stories are all different. However, I still see a certain degree of increasing sophistication in his writing, both in the way he paces the stories and in his general writing style. I don't think any writer comes out of the gate fully formed, even Gaiman has honed his craft over a few years. And there's no shame in that, the popularity of his various types of work and the continuing interest in his comics and other books proves that he has something to offer, and has had for quite a while.

:D:D:D
User avatar
SilverScribe
Scribe, Wanderer, Warrior . . . Bard of Rhudaur and Herald of Manwe


 
Posts: 29663
Joined: Wed Mar 06, 2002 10:17 pm
Location: In the wild . . .
Top

Postby AlexSnitzel » Sat Feb 11, 2006 6:42 pm

Has anyone read Gaiman's newest novel, Anansi Boys? I'm hoping to get the chance soon, but I'm interested in any opinions that are currently floating around right now (if any) :)
User avatar
AlexSnitzel
Ranger of the North

 
Posts: 3309
Joined: Thu Jul 01, 2004 10:44 pm
Location: Sunny South Carolina!
Top

Postby Strider11 » Fri Jun 16, 2006 3:05 pm

It's become hard for me to decide whether I like Anansi Boys better than American Gods at this point. Good ole' Mr. Nancy.

But it's a great book. Finished it pretty quickly and lent it out to a friend to read. And I haven't gotten it back since, though I may just give my friend the book and pick up another copy.
User avatar
Strider11
Ranger of the North

 
Posts: 1338
Joined: Mon Sep 17, 2001 11:04 pm
Top

Postby spd » Mon Jun 26, 2006 12:17 pm

I have not read any Neil Gaiman, though I know I must, if only because he lists G.K. Chesterton's novel, The Man Who Was Thursday, as one of his major influences. From what I've heard, the character Fiddler Green (Fiddler's Green?) in the Sandman series is based on/inspired by Chesterton.




For those who don't know me, Chesterton is my "other" favorite author. His epic poem The Ballad of the White Horse (1911) helped spark Tolkien's youthful interest in Anglo-saxon.
User avatar
spd
Mariner

 
Posts: 6417
Joined: Thu Jul 20, 2000 8:26 pm
Location: teh barstool, having a cold one
Top

Postby AlexSnitzel » Mon Jun 26, 2006 3:20 pm

After watching Serenity last night I've become convinced that Summer Glau would be the perfect Door if Neverwhere is ever made into a feature film.

Spd, I haven't read the poem that you mentioned, though I've heard of it before. Thanks for the reminder, I'd like to check it out.
User avatar
AlexSnitzel
Ranger of the North

 
Posts: 3309
Joined: Thu Jul 01, 2004 10:44 pm
Location: Sunny South Carolina!
Top

Postby draupnir » Fri Oct 20, 2006 3:30 am

Stardust has been made into a film. According to empireonline it's scheduled for release in March 2007: http://www.empireonline.com/futurefilms/film.asp?id=132322

More info on cast and crew from IMDB: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0486655/

I loved the book, so hopefully the adaptation will stay true to the story.
*fingers crossed*

:)
User avatar
draupnir
Ranger of the North

 
Posts: 2961
Joined: Sun Mar 10, 2002 3:58 pm
Top

Postby Ivriniel » Fri Oct 20, 2006 3:35 am

I've only read his picture book, The Day I Swapped my Dad for Two Goldfish.. It's really, really charming, though the Graphic Novel style that is used for the illustrations will make it rather had to use as a Read Aloud. (I'm a Grade 1 teacher, so the Read-aloudability of a book is important to me. ;))

What's cool about it is in the back of the book he talks about how he got the idea for a story, and that's useful when one is teaching writing. :)

American Gods is on the list of books of I want to read.

I've heard that Charles de Lint's newest novel Widdershins is similar to American Gods. de Lint is an excellent author as well. :)

Ivriniel
User avatar
Ivriniel
Ranger of the North

 
Posts: 4357
Joined: Wed Jul 19, 2006 9:16 pm
Location: Mississauga, Canada
Top

Postby Hob_Baggins » Sun Dec 10, 2006 11:18 pm

Anyone pick up Fragile Things yet?

And remember, we've also got Coraline coming up as well, for those who've read that book.

And apparently, Good Omens is still in the works . . .[/i]
User avatar
Hob_Baggins
Rider of the Mark

 
Posts: 777
Joined: Mon Nov 26, 2001 1:19 am
Top

Postby dudalb » Sun Jan 07, 2007 6:53 pm

Gaiman's Marvel 1602 is enormous fun.
I love the way that his version of Peter Parker keeps almost being bitten by bizarre looking spiders.
And that Elizabeth's spymaster is Sir Nicholas Fury.
Great Stuff.
User avatar
dudalb
Ranger of the North


 
Posts: 4422
Joined: Tue Feb 13, 2001 9:26 pm
Top

PreviousNext

Return to The Books (Other Authors)

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests