Who said it - Shakespeare quotes

What other authors do Tolkien fans enjoy? Come on in and enter into a broadened conversation on the great literature of this and other times.

Postby jammi567 » Wed Jan 17, 2007 10:16 am

okay, i admit, i can't think of anything, so the floor is open.
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Postby portia » Thu Jan 25, 2007 7:40 am

Ok, my husband has been suggesting I post this, one of his favorites. It is notable for the regularity with which it is misquoted.


Therefore, to be possessed with double pomp, to guard a title that was rich before, to guild refined gold, to paint the lilly, to throw a perfume on the violet, to smooth the ice, to add another hue unto the rainbow or with taper light to seek the beautious eye of heaven to garnish, is wasteful and ridiculous excess.

Full credit for the play. Extra for the context in which it is spoken.
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Postby erinhue » Thu Jan 25, 2007 5:54 pm

It's one of the Kings right? Not Richard III, Henry maybe? I'll get it 8) maybe.
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Postby portia » Fri Jan 26, 2007 5:11 am

It is a History, but not Richard III.
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Postby portia » Thu Feb 01, 2007 12:15 pm

Hmm. Is it that obscure?

Hints: it is a History, seldom performed. The play starts off with a legal dispute over who should inherit between two sons born in wedlock; a son who resembles the father and an older son who does not..

Both sons leave the dispute satisfied.
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Postby Ilyda » Fri Feb 02, 2007 11:12 am

Hmmm...With that description, it can't be one of the histories I've read.

Is it King John? Even though John was one of the sons in the movie, it still sounds suspiciously like the debates over who would inherit the throne in the film The Lion in Winter. Except no one was satisfied with the results there. OK, so maybe the parallel doesn't work as well as I thought. My guess still stands.

(As a side note, did Shakespeare write a Henry II?)
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Postby portia » Fri Feb 02, 2007 3:24 pm

Yes, it is "King John."

The quote is from a place in the play where John has decided to be crowned again. He was crowned when Richard was declared dead, but he was not the proper heir; Geoffrey's son Arthur was. There were objections, but then John had Arthur killed and now John is the proper heir. The Bishop of Salisbury says it is unnecessary for John to be crowned again. The quote describes the unnecessary nature of a second crowning.

The dispute at the beginning is over whether the older son is really the son of Lord Whatsisname. The others convince him that his real father was Richard I. He gives up his claim on Lord Whatsisname's estate because he'd rather be the illegitimbate son of Richard than the elder son of Lord Whatsisname.

Ilyda, it is your turn.
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Postby portia » Thu Feb 08, 2007 7:27 am

Yooo Hooo, Ilyda. Are you there?

We are waiting with baited breath.

To paraphrase Lady MacBeth-- "Stand not upon the order of posting, but post at once!" :)
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Postby Ilyda » Fri Feb 09, 2007 11:34 am

Yes, I am here. Sorry for the wait.

"If I could pray to move, prayers would move me, but I am constant as the Northern Star, of whose true fixed and resting quality there is no fellow in the firmament."

Good luck, all!
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Postby portia » Fri Feb 09, 2007 1:54 pm

Oh, rats. Its right here on the tip of my. . .


*drags tongue out and stares at it, intently.*

I'll be back.

tick, tock. . . tick, tock. aha.


As Shakespeare would have written it:

Pompously: I will let someone else have a chance. Later.
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Postby portia » Sat Feb 10, 2007 9:04 am

Have I given others enough time. Someone else must be interesd.

Oh, well.

It is "Julius Caesar." Caesar is rejecting attempts by various Senators to get him to grant clemency to . . . some guy. It is really a ploy by those Senators to distract Caesar so they can kill him.
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Postby portia » Sat Feb 10, 2007 8:16 pm

I am leaving where I have been visiting and will not be back to a computer until Monday. So, I will put up a quote before Ilyda offically says my i.d. was right. If I was not right, I will be embarassed.

I have always liked this speech, and was blown away by Judi Dench's delivery of it in a movie. Full credit either for the circumstances or for the specific play.

Nay, sure, he's not in hell. He's in Arthur's bosom if ever a man went to Arthur's bosom. A' made a finer end and went away an it had been any chrisome child. A' parted just between twelve and one, ev'n at the turning o' the tide. For after I saw him fumble with the sheets, and play with flowers and smile upon his finger's end, I knew there was but one way. For his nose was as sharp as a pen and a' babbled of green fields. . . . So a' cried out 'God, God, God,' three or four times. Now I, to comfort him bid him a' should not think of God. I hop'd there was no need to trouble himself with any such thoughts yet. So a' bade me lay more clothes on his feet. I put my hand into the bed and felt them and they were as cold as any stone. Then I felt to his knees and so upward and upward and all was as cold as any stone.
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Postby Ilyda » Sun Feb 11, 2007 6:58 pm

Portia--You are indeed right. It was in Julius Caesar, just before the Senators killed him. Very good!

Oh! Oh! I know this line! Really, I do! It's...it's...aw, man. I can't remember where it's from. *Sigh*
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OK, after several moments, I think I might (I emphasize might) know where this is from, but your clue is confusing me. It is a woman talking about the death of Falstaff in Henry V. I seem to remember a discussion in one of my college classes about the 'God, God, God' part.

However, I don't remember Judi Dench delivering that line in the movie, though. (I assume you're talking about the one with Kenneth Branagh, cause Judi Dench wasn't old enough for the other one I know of.) Actually, come to think of it, I don't remember that scene really showing up, cause they cut out quite a bit.

So, Portia, am I right?
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Postby portia » Mon Feb 12, 2007 3:57 pm

Very, very, good, Ilyda. This is beginning to look like a tennis match.

Go for it!




P.S. I think it was the Branagh version. I will check IMDB. I couldn't get into IMDB, for some reason, but both Wikipedia and Amazon mentioned she was in it.
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Postby Ilyda » Tue Feb 13, 2007 12:03 pm

Oh, yay. I thought that line was familiar. Great play, by the way.

They say the lady is fair. ‘Tis a truth, I can bear them witness. And virtuous—’tis so, I cannot reprove it. And wise, but for loving me. By my troth, it is no addition to her wit—nor no great argument of her folly, for I will be horribly in love with her.

Good luck, all.

PS-It can be a tennis match, as long as we're having fun, Portia. (Hint--Others are still more than welcome to join in!)
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Postby portia » Tue Feb 13, 2007 6:39 pm

I sure hope others can and will join in, as it rings no bells at all for me.

I will think about it and see if it comes to me in a flash of light, at 2:00 AM.

Later: No flashes.

That, in itself, may be a clue. It is probably from one of the Comedies that, for some reason, have never commanded my attention, such as "All's Well that Ends Well", "Much Ado about Nothing", "The Winter's Tale"

I hope that is a clue for someone; it certainly does not help me.
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Postby Ilyda » Fri Feb 23, 2007 8:56 am

Alright, so I will give some clues.

'Tis indeed from a comedy (one of my favorites). In this scene, a man decides that he will try to woo a woman who hates him. This play is not terribly obscure, nor (sadly) is it performed terribly often.

Hope that helps, Portia, as well as any lurkers out there.
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Postby portia » Sat Feb 24, 2007 4:54 pm

Well, now I am confused. The quote seems to suggest that the lady loves the speaker, and he thinks she is unwise to do so. Am I misinterpreting it?

I will take a complete shot in the dark and guess that it is the man who is wooing Bianca, Kate's sister, in "Taming of the Shrew." My little inner voice is at it again.
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Postby truehobbit » Wed Feb 28, 2007 5:40 am

That's from Much Ado - I remember Kenneth Branagh saying it in the movie-version. :love:
Benedict has finally fallen for Beatrice - or, rather for the idea that Beatrice is in love with him.

(I wouldn't say wooing a woman who hates him - I think somewhere deep inside they have always been in love, otherwise they wouldn't have been bickering so much. ;) )
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Postby portia » Wed Feb 28, 2007 5:24 pm

That makes sense. I expect you are right.

Even though I saw that movie, the play just will not stick with me.
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Postby truehobbit » Thu Mar 01, 2007 8:36 am

I love the movie and have seen it very often - so I guess I could just post the next quote. :)


A short bit of dialogue:

"What do you read, my lord?"

"Words, words, words"
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Postby portia » Thu Mar 01, 2007 12:56 pm

That is Hamlet to Polonius, when Hamlet is either crazy or pretending and out of patience with Polonius, either way.
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Postby truehobbit » Thu Mar 01, 2007 1:38 pm

Yes, that's right. :D

Too easy, but I'm mainly familiar with the 'big' plays. :)

Crazy or not, it's quite a wise reply. :D
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Postby portia » Thu Mar 01, 2007 8:04 pm

This is probably too easy, too, but a story goes with it and I can't resist.

My High School did a production of this play. We didn't have enough male students interested in playing the parts, so a female played the speaker in this quote. She was a good actress and a quick study (it was not I). The Drama teacher over rehearsed this play and everyone was getting sick of the whole thing.

So, when it came time for this character to say this line, in a late rehearsal:

I, an itching palm?

The girl playing the part scratched vigorously at her palm. Her timing was perfect and everyone fell down laughing. The teacher was not amused.
It was very hard to keep a straight face in that scene, afterward.
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Postby portia » Sun Mar 04, 2007 10:19 pm

OK. Time for a hint.

This play is one of Shakespeare's most accessible plays and is performed in probably 75% of US High Schools.
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Postby portia » Thu Mar 08, 2007 10:45 am

Has everyone gone to Hawaii without their computers, or is this not as easy as I thought?

OK, another hint.

Think about a movie with Marlon Brando, James Mason, John Guilgud(sp?) and many others.
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Postby truehobbit » Sat Mar 10, 2007 4:10 pm

Not in Hawaii, but I didn't have a clue :D - it's such a funny line, I was thinking if I'd come across it, I'd remember it.

This play is one of Shakespeare's most accessible plays and is performed in probably 75% of US High Schools.


Hehe, yes, from your story (good one! :D ) about the quote I was thinking: so it must be something a school would be likely to perform. And something that requires a lot of male characters.

But it's hard to tell what schools are likely to perform. I was thinking maybe one of the better known comedies (because the line is so droll), but that doesn't work with the actors you name, I think.

I have a vague memory of watching "Julius Cesar" because I like James Mason. (Not sure I watched it all, though, I remember being very bored.) And it seems like the kind of play that would be cut out for Brando.
And you need a lot of male roles.

So, I'm guessing "Julius Cesar". :)

(Not a play that would be performed at a school here, though, even if we had more school performances, I'm sure. Not even one that gets performed in theatres or read at school/college with any regularity.)

ETA: isn't Brando famous for that "Friends, Romans, Countrymen" speech, delivered in his weird way of speaking? :D I think I've heard jokes about it. So, I guess this must be it. :D
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Postby portia » Mon Mar 12, 2007 2:27 pm

AHA!

Yes, that is it. The scene is where Brutus and Cassius are arguing in Brutus's tent and Brutus accuses Cassius of having an "itching palm" (presumably taking money he has no right to). Cassius' outraged repetition of the expression is the line I quoted.

Over to you, truehobbit
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Postby truehobbit » Thu Mar 15, 2007 12:18 pm

Thanks portia! :)

(LOL, I'd thought somebody had been called an itching palm! :D (To say they were as annoying as an itching palm, probably.) - But this is even more interesting, because over here we still say an itching palm is a sign of money coming your way. :) )


Foolery, sir, does walk about the orb like the sun, it shines everywhere.
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Postby portia » Thu Mar 15, 2007 7:23 pm

Beware the Ides of March!

I like that quote, but I do not recognize it.

*puts on thinking cap*
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