Who said it - Shakespeare quotes

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Postby Durins_Day » Thu Mar 15, 2007 7:30 pm

Ides of March!!! :o

That sounds like something Hamlet would say! I'm pretty sure he didn't though.

*thinks*
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Postby JudyA » Thu Mar 15, 2007 8:43 pm

portia wrote:Beware the Ides of March!

I like that quote, but I do not recognize it.

*puts on thinking cap*




Eh? What goeth on here, pray? I thought we'd just figured out the previous quote was from Julius Caesar?? (you're right, Durin, it isn't Hamlet).



I like your quote, truehobbit. It sounds familiar to me... perhaps the fool (whose name escapes me) in Twelfth Night? Or a good one-liner from Much Ado about Nothing?
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Postby portia » Fri Mar 16, 2007 11:44 am

Ooops! I caused confusion.

It is the "Foolery" quote we're trying to get. I just mentioned the Ides of March because that is what it was when I posted my comment (even tho it was later by GMT. Pfui on GMT.) :lol:


We have a local morning show here. On March 15, their guests didn't show up and they were a bit at a loss for things to talk about. So I called in and reminded them about the Ides of March. It used up some of their otherwise "dead" air time. :roll:
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Postby truehobbit » Fri Mar 16, 2007 2:57 pm

Hehe - yes, it was still the ides of March in the more western parts of the world when you posted, portia. :D

Thanks, I liked the quote, too :) - and Judy's guesses are hot - in fact, one of them is correct. :D
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Postby Ilyda » Sun Mar 25, 2007 11:50 pm

She is indeed!

This is the fool in Twelfth Night. I liked his character very much. However, I cannot remember who he is talking to at the time. I am tempted to say Viola, during one of her many visits as Cesario.

I am not entirely sure I am right, so I will leave this one to Hobby to confirm.
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Postby truehobbit » Thu Mar 29, 2007 7:47 am

Yes, you're right, Ilyda! :D

It's in the long dialogue they have together, where he illicits some coins from her, and it ends in her commenting on the wit of the fool. It also has the lovely exchange: "Now Jove, in his next commodity of hair, send thee a beard! - By my troth, I'll tell thee, I am almost sick for one..."

I hadn't managed to read it all through before, but I saw a wonderful performance of the play last summer.

Your go! :D
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Postby Ilyda » Thu Mar 29, 2007 9:00 am

Very cool. I'm working off memory here, so thanks to Judy for giving me a head start.

I need to try and find another cool quote, cause that was a good one, Hobby.
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Postby truehobbit » Fri Mar 30, 2007 11:21 am

Thanks Ilyda. :D

I don't know yours, but it reminds me of Henry V, because that's all about outnumbered armies (although it's hard to imagine the 'happy few' stuff would occur twice in the same play).

In any case, it's either one of the histories or one of the Roman Tragedies, I'd say, and I don't know any of these really. :)
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Postby portia » Sun Apr 01, 2007 5:58 pm

I agree with Truehobbit. It is Henry the V, from the Agincourt speech.
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Postby Ilyda » Tue Apr 03, 2007 9:46 am

'Tis indeed from the Agincourt speech in Henry V. I love that play. Actually, Hobby, the line about "we happy few" occurs later in this speech. The other famous speech from this play is "Once more into the breach", which happens a few scenes earlier during another battle. And it is indeed all about outnumbered armies and the greatness of Britain.

Your turn, Hobby.
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Postby truehobbit » Wed Apr 04, 2007 6:43 am

Ooh, great, thanks. :D

I've seen the Kenneth Branagh movie, and I've heard those two speeches on separate occasions a few times, but I don't remember much about the play.

It should be interesting to find out what the most popular plays are in different parts of the world. Just like Julius Cesar a few weeks ago, Henry V is something that seems popular in America, but isn't much read or performed over here, AFAIK.

I guess the cooler the quote, the more familiar it is, so whatever I think of seems to be an immediate give-away. Ah well. :)

I love this one:

Oh, when she is angry, she is keen and shrewd;
She was a vixen when she went to school,
And though she be but little, she is fierce.


It may sound like it, but it's not about me. :D ;)
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Postby IrisBrandybuck » Wed Apr 04, 2007 7:29 am

Well, I know the answer is not Seabiscut, though the final line is used in the movie.

;) Is it Taming of the Shrew? Probably not...
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Postby portia » Wed Apr 04, 2007 7:07 pm

Oh, TOS violation. This one will be a casualty of my problems with names.

It is from "Midsummer Night's Dream," about the girl who is one of the four young people off in the forest and is not the "tall" one. And whose name I cannot remember, at all (heck, I cannot even remember the "tall" one's name at this moment). The line is spoken by the "tall" girl.


Grrrr.
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Postby truehobbit » Thu Apr 05, 2007 5:45 am

LOL, Iris - who knows, maybe "Seabiscuit" is one of Shakespeare's lost plays... ;) :D

Portia, you've got it absolutely right - and I didn't give any names with my previous one either, so it's your turn. :D

The speaker is Helena, and the "little, fierce one" is Hermia.

Midsummer Night's Dream is one of my absolute favourites. :D
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Postby portia » Thu Apr 05, 2007 10:20 am

Oh. lovely.
I am about to go out for the day, so I will think about it and be back, later.


Later:
How about this:

Me, poor man, my library was dukedom large enough.
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Postby portia » Mon Apr 09, 2007 2:31 pm

OK. Time for a hint.

He obviously does not have his Dukedom any more. In fact, where he lives at the time of the quote is about as far, geographically and status-wise, as he could get. And his "subjects" are not at all like the people of his Dukedom.

:)
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Postby portia » Thu Apr 12, 2007 10:32 am

C'Mon, people!

Most critics agree that the setting for this play is North America.
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Postby IamMoose » Thu Apr 12, 2007 10:57 am

I totally and utterly don't know :(
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Postby truehobbit » Thu Apr 12, 2007 11:19 am

A dukedom and a library - sounds like it should be The Tempest, and the speaker would then be Prospero?
(Seems to fit with the hint, too, except that I wouldn't have thought of his island as North America.)

(Argh, I hadn't even seen that you'd added your question, portia, I came back looking the first two or three days, but as there was no new post, I didn't even open the thread.)
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Postby portia » Thu Apr 12, 2007 2:13 pm

Truehobbit, you are correct. It is "The Tempest" and the speaker is Prospero.

Enjoy!
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Postby truehobbit » Thu Apr 12, 2007 4:48 pm

Thanks! :D

We read that one at school - it's a fascinating play, I think.
English A-level classes over here have to read one Shakespeare play and in 90% of classes, that's Macbeth (it's famous, it's short, it's gory - what more can you ask? :D ) - but our drama group had just performed The Tempest when we were about to start, so when the teacher asked whether we had a precedence, we opted for this one, as most of us already knew it in German. :D

The only drawback is that I had thought I'd take a quote from this one the next time it would be my turn. ;) :D - Ah, well, here goes something else.

Upon my life, she finds, although I cannot,
Myself to be a marvellous proper man.
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Postby portia » Fri Apr 13, 2007 6:59 pm

Hmmmmm.

That sounds so familiar. I will let it rest a while and see if it comes to me.

Truehobbit: Caliban speaking German is something I would love to see!
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Postby portia » Sat Apr 14, 2007 11:30 am

I am about to go over a cliff, I am afraid.

But the ole' Inner Voice is telling me to go for it.

I think this is from "Richard III." Richard is speaking--ironically-- about a woman who doesn't really find him attractive, but pretends she does.
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Postby truehobbit » Sat Apr 14, 2007 2:15 pm

Just trust your instincts, portia! :D

You're absolutely correct! (Except that I think the irony is directed at himself - this is after the great wooeing scene, from the final monologue that begins "Was ever woman in this humour wooed?" - Anne has seriously fallen for him, but he thinks very little of himself, so he despises her for falling for him. :) )
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Postby portia » Sat Apr 14, 2007 6:10 pm

Score one for the Inner Voice.

When I first saw this play, the scene was played that the woman was now a widow, her husband having been killed by Richard, and she was alone (penniless; lost her status). When Richard woos her, she realizes she could be Queen, by going along with this (evil) man who was likely to be king. She's being cynical, and he is being cynical in wooing and accepting her (Isn't this where he says something like "I'll wed her, but I'll not keep her long"). But that was a production that played up the nastiness or downright evil in every character.

Excuse me while I go think up another one.
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Postby portia » Sun Apr 15, 2007 12:31 pm

I asked my husband's advice and he came up with a bunch of stuff from "Troilus and Cressida." :shock: No way.

This is better.

"He hath been most notoriously abused."
"Pursue him, and entreat him to a peace: he hath not told us of the Captain, yet:
When that is known and golden time convents, A solemn combination shall be made of our dear souls. Meantime, sweet sister, we will not part from hence. [name deleted], come, for so you shall be while you are a man: but when in other habits you are seen, [ name deleted ]'s mistress and his fancy's queen.
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Postby truehobbit » Sun Apr 15, 2007 2:19 pm

When I first saw this play, the scene was played that the woman was now a widow, her husband having been killed by Richard, and she was alone (penniless; lost her status). When Richard woos her, she realizes she could be Queen, by going along with this (evil) man who was likely to be king. She's being cynical, and he is being cynical in wooing and accepting her (Isn't this where he says something like "I'll wed her, but I'll not keep her long"). But that was a production that played up the nastiness or downright evil in every character.


Hmmh, I'd say that was the interpretation of this particular production.
He is definitely cynical in wooing her, because he doesn't love her (yes, the "I'll wed her..." line is from that bit, too), but I've always read Anne in this scene to be truly (i.e. without cynicism or ulterior motives) the 'typical' woman who can't find it in her heart to repel his suit. And, indeed, he's such a Wormtongue - or even Saruman - in this scene, I don't find it all too hard to believe that she is unable to resist his honeyed words.
I also don't think (though could remember wrong) that at this point she could assume he would rise to be king.
(Although a point might be made for the idea that as the widow of the leader of the enemy party this offer to marry the brother of the leader of the party now in power was too good to refuse - interesting!
It would be necessary to study the rest of the play to determine that. I know this scene best, though, because I think it's fantastic - I've only seen the play twice on TV, but have read this scene many times to myself. :) )


Why "No way" to Troilus and Cressida? :shock:
(Except that it would have been difficult for me, as I don't know the play. :P )

As to this one, this is very nice (as the quote gives away half the plot ;) ), but there's a problem: it was easy to determine the play, but I was confused as to who the last speaker could be, so I thought I just check if I'm correct (it was quite clear even where in the play to look) - but it turned out I had guessed the wrong speaker. :oops:

So, I thought instead of posting my first guess, as a wrong guess in terms of the speaker, but thereby giving away the play, it might be fairer to leave the whole quote for someone else. (Except, of course, if there aren't any takers for too long - how does that sound?) :)
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Postby MithLuin » Sun Apr 15, 2007 4:49 pm

I would guess Portia in Merchent of Venice, before they disguise themselves as men. (What was it with Shakespeare and naming the women all Portia?)

But if I'm wrong, Hobby should come back and set us straight!

And Hobby, you aren't the only one who hasn't read Troilus and Cressida - it's one of the more obscure ones, so seldom read and seldom performed! (I have no idea what it's about, myself...)


I'd say the more popular plays, around here, are: Hamlet, Macbeth, King Lear, Othello, Romeo and Juliet, Midsummer Night's Dream, Julius Cesear, Merchant of Venice, Taming of the Shrew, etc. The only reason we read Henry V is because it is one of the more 'managable' histories - it doesn't have 3 parts ;). If we'd had to read Henry VI, I would have protested at the portrayal of Joan of Arc, the harlot. For all that Falstaff is supposed to be popular, I haven't really seen the plays with him in them. Oh, and my mother did a monologue from Richard III in high school, so they must have read that there. I've seen productions of Twelfth Night advertised.
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Postby IrisBrandybuck » Sun Apr 15, 2007 6:42 pm

I myself was going to guess Twelfth Night but I've been so out of the Shakespere loop that I would in no way bet on it.

I just like reading your conversation. :)
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Postby portia » Mon Apr 16, 2007 4:13 am

As was recently said to me, Iris, just go with your instincts.

It is "Twelfth Night," from the end. Duke Orsino is the speaker.

The loop is open and waiting for you to get back into it, Iris.


I avoided T&C because, first, I didn't think it would be sporting since few people read it and /or see it. Second, none of the pieces hubby suggested was worthy of quoting, although there probably are nice quotes in the play, somewhere.

Yes, that was an unusual production of Richard III. But I like the fact that Shakespeare can be seen from so many diffierent points of view. Some povs work, some do not. This one worked, I think, because it was consistent, and not too "off the wall."
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