The Rise and Fall of Calimendil, Fifth King of Cardolan (constructive critiques are welcome!)

Writing is a passion many people experience after reading Tolkien's works. Come here to discuss and share your experiences with writing.

Postby Celebriel_Esgaledhel » Fri Oct 17, 2003 9:19 am

ONce again, a well-written installment. i liked you way of describing the skirmish.<BR><BR>I myself have been writing a fanfic of LotR lately; it's called "Hammerhand", about, of course, the great Helm Hammerhand. It is told from the point of view of one of the Riders of the Mark, and the tale tells of the disatrous years when Rohan was assailed both by the Dunlendings and the Corsairs. Of course, my writing cannot vie with yours or Denethor's, but perhaps when I fix it up here and there, I'll post some of it here in the Scriptorium.
User avatar
Celebriel_Esgaledhel
Ranger of the North

 
Posts: 2338
Joined: Thu Nov 14, 2002 5:32 pm
Location: Varghala
Top

Postby Celebrimbor32 » Sun Oct 19, 2003 10:30 am

Oh, I dunno. Don't sell yourself short, Celebriel. As long as you have the time and patience to write long stories I'm sure you will come up with a quality piece. If you get your story posted up in the Scriptorium I will make sure and check it out. Since you mentioned Rohan I am assuming that your tale takes place somewhere in the second half of the Third Age, eh? However, I don't recall reading about the Corsairs assailing the Dunlendings. Or is that part of the tale that you are making up?
User avatar
Celebrimbor32
Ranger of the North
 
Posts: 1524
Joined: Fri Aug 10, 2001 9:22 pm
Location: U.S.A.
Top

Postby Celebriel_Esgaledhel » Sun Oct 19, 2003 3:13 pm

nonono, the Corsairs don't attack the Dunlendings, they attack Rohan at the same time as the Dunlendings. Yep, and it's all in Helm's era.<BR><BR>I'm wondering.....would you call Helm's people "Helmingas" or "Eorlingas"? I've noticed once or twice the word "Helmings", but I don't know.......yeah. i know i'm not making any sense right not<img src="http://www.tolkienonline.com/mb/i/expressions/face-icon-small-wink.gif"border=0>
User avatar
Celebriel_Esgaledhel
Ranger of the North

 
Posts: 2338
Joined: Thu Nov 14, 2002 5:32 pm
Location: Varghala
Top

Postby Celebrimbor32 » Wed Nov 05, 2003 9:22 pm

GREAT FIRE OF REVENGE pt. I<BR><BR>It was said that the taxation of the king upon the city of Tharbad had reached unprecedented extremes at this time. In particular, the new regulations imposed upon the guildsmen who produced and traded their own wool were especially severe, for Tarandil preferred for his people to be dressed in the clothing that was produced from the men of upper Cardolan, who labored in the fields of his own country, rather than the garb that was brought in from Arthedain and from Gondor in the south. He raised the taxes upon all imports from Arthedain by nearly a third at this time, in part in retaliation of the ban placed upon his son Calimendil, which forbade him from entering that realm. He raised the fees for foreigners who wished to travel northward up the Greenway through the valley of Andrath, and officially placed his own ban upon anyone who wished to travel through Cardolan who had connections in any way to Rhudaur, which he now counted as a hostile renegade state. This last regulation was difficult to enforce, for there were indeed men from the north entering Cardolan at this time, though mainly by secret ways upon the Metheithel and Gwathló, the latter river being primarily controlled by the river-folk of Tharbad. <BR><BR>It was said by many in Tharbad that Tarandil would have taxed the very traffic upon the waters of the Gwathló if he thought he could get away with it. Yet his own great wealth did not disturb him, nor his conscience, for he proved obdurately wedded to taxes, extravagance and peace. <BR><BR><BR>When word of his son's disappearance at last came to him Tarandil immediately sent word to Calimendil at his abode upon the South Downs to ride to Dol Calantir as soon as he might. But Calimendil was not there. He had already departed with a select handful of friends on a hunting trip in the wild regions upon the downs. Yet when he at last returned Amariel gave him a tearful account of the message she had received in his stead, telling of the mysterious disappearance of Vorondil while in Tharbad. At first Calimendil refused to believe the report, stating that his brother was far too wise and experienced a warrior to allow himself to fall into the deceits and snares of Tharbad. Afterall, all folk knew and loved Vorondil greatly. Or so he believed. <BR><BR>Nevertheless, he rode to the court of the king in haste. When he arrived Calimendil found his father in a state of agitation. He was angry at the delay of the arrival of Calimendil and ordered him to go to Tharbad at once to undertake an immediate investigation of Vorondil's whereabouts. With him went my grandfather, Iliandor, and many of Tarandil's own Privy Councilmen, and when they arrived at Tharbad they went straight away to Gelharm for questioning. Gelharm, by all accounts, knew nothing of the actual murders of Vorondil and his men and said so many times. But Calimendil was suspicious of the mayor and confronted him on the issue, saying, "Dost thou think that thy wit may vie with that of the king's? I warn thee, Gelharm, that Tarandil's complacent temperament of old has deteriorated with age. He will not show any mercy to those who attempt to thwart our inquest here. If it becomes evident that thou hast concealed any pertinent information regarding my missing brother, or that thou undertakes to shield thy dubious partners and allies here in this stinking city I will see to it that the king becomes aware of it!"<BR><BR>Then Gelharm swallowed up the anger he felt stir within him and refrained from lashing out at Calimendil, yielding rather humbly to the prince's wrath. He led them out to the northern quadrant of the Isle and to the very doors of the Guild of the Greyflood. But when no one let them in Calimendil took up an axe and clove open the door to the warehouse by brute force. Inside they found only a few helpless servants of the guild, but no one of any high rank or importance. Calimendil ordered several of his own personal guards to remain there in case Urlin or his companions returned thither. But Urlin did not return. Nor did the few servants that were apprehended have any knowledge to where he might have gone, save perhaps back to his native land of Dunland to the south.<BR><BR>They stayed on in Tharbad for well-nigh a fortnight ere Calimendil at last called to a halt the search for Vorondil. The scouts that had scoured the city had found scant information that was any use, save that descriptions that had matched Vorondil and his men had been verified by merchants upon the Isle the afternoon before their disappearance. If accurate, that would place them there only hours after Gelimir was apprehended and beaten by Urlin's men. For Calimendil it was proof enough of Urlin's guilt in the matter. <BR><BR>Leaving a handful of men to remain behind to keep an eye on Gelharm, Calimendil departed the city and returned to Dol Calantir to report to the king his findings, though of little use they might be to him. Tarandil listened to his son's report eagerly and as one who longs for sweet relief from a painful illness, but his hopes were dashed. It was then that Calimendil began to notice the declining mental state of his father. Arriana confessed to Calimendil that their father had not slept in several days and had been seen by servants walking the long corridors of his own castle alone late at night, talking to none save himself as he did so. Desiring to remain near his father and sister a while longer during such troubled times, Calimendil sent word to Amariel at Metraith to come to Dol Calantir and join him. Meanwhile he would take counsel with the other lords of the king's court in order to organize yet another search party to comb both riverbanks of the Gwathló.<BR><BR>Many months passed with still no word or trace of the king's heir. Not even the faintest of rumors regarding the fate or whereabouts of Vorondil came to Dol Calantir. The many scouts and mercenaries employed by the king slowly began to return and report their findings to Tarandil, but their results were always empty. <BR><BR>By then Tarandil had had enough. His well-known reputation for reserved calm and patient restraint had at last been tested beyond their limits. It was from this period onwards, even unto the last days of his life, that his demeanor would change dramatically and permanently, much to the astonishment of those who knew and loved him. <BR><BR>Tarandil immediately dismissed the many mercenaries from his service now and began to hold secret and very private council meetings with his advisers. Calimendil and even Arriana were also known to have attended them. It is likely that none were more surprised than Arriana to find herself included in such an important and weighty matter among the high men of the court. At this we may arrive at the assumption that Tarandil had at last begun to come to terms with the possibility of Vorondil's death and desired for his daughter to be present, for by right she would be heir to the throne in the event of Tarandil's passing and would be the first ruling queen in all of Arnor's history. <BR><BR>It was proposed that a substantial number of the Cardolani mounted knights and foot soldiers be removed to Tharbad in order to govern and police the city in the stead of the current mayor. Now, Gelharm had not played any part in the murders of Vorondil and his men, and indeed still as of yet knew nothing about their fate. But Tarandil announced that Gelharm would be removed from his mayoral duties forthwith and be forced to dwell in confined isolation at any location desired by the king. There he would almost certainly be interrogated by agents of the crown while incarcerated.<BR><BR>In the final weeks of the year 1282 Tarandil set his plan in motion. Elite members of the upper ranks of Tarandil's army were selected to accompany Calimendil back to Tharbad to announce to the lords therein that Gelharm was officially released from his duties as mayor to Tharbad. In his place a captain from Tarandil's ranks was selected to act as temporary mayor in residence. <BR><BR>Echormoth was his name. He was a man that Tarandil favored greatly. Though he had no relation by blood to the royal families of Cardolan, Echormoth was still exalted by many among Tarandil's councilmen for his leadership, commanding stature and quick wit. A skilled horseman, he spent much of his earlier years in the king's service riding far out upon the hill-studded plains of Minhiriath, guarding the realm's southern border against the intrusion of the Buffraen and scattered remains of the undesirable tree-spirits, whose ill-will and animosity towards Men knew no limits. Huorns they are called by some. It has been said that no other man knew the lands of Minhiriath in that day better than Echormoth, for he dwelt there for many years, organizing his defenses. It was he who was credited for driving the Buffraen back into the Dark Wood of the Eryn Vorn. <BR><BR>Echormoth was born of humble birth in the city of Tharbad fifteen years after the birth of Tarandil. After serving his youthful years as a gatekeeper in that city he begged leave of his father to serve in the army of king Ardornil as a frontier guardsman. Later he was granted the privilege of being one of those to cross over the Misty Mountains to treat with the folk of Wilderland and hunt the wild game therein. Yet it was the last time he would ever venture abroad, for after he returned he asked permission to remove to Minhiriath and join with the loosely scattered horse-brigade of the king. He soon rose to the rank of captain and commanded many men where they spent their time defending southern Cardolan. <BR><BR>Echormoth had never visited Arthedain, a fact of which he was openly proud. He resented their arrogance and suspected that they would at some time attempt to alienate Cardolan permanently so that they might seize Amon Sûl at the last. He was fond of boasting that he would never set foot in Arthedain unless it was amidst the glories of war. When Tarandil selected him as the new mayor of Tharbad following the expulsion of Gelharm Echormoth rejoiced. He now saw his golden opportunity to make life more unpleasant for Celebrindor up in Arthedain. Tharbad was an important center of trade for Arthedain as well as for Cardolan. By consent of the king, Echormoth would soon impose new protective tariffs as a safeguard against any outside competition. Once again, this was chiefly imposed as retribution for the royal ban imposed upon Calimendil.<BR><BR>When the armed guards of Dol Calantir entered the city of Tharbad to seize Gelharm many of the foreign merchants rallied round their mayor. Many of the guildsmen were outraged by Tarandil's decision to remove Gelharm from power. Yet in the end Gelharm went peacefully, but stated ere he departed under escort, "Thus does Tarandil give openly with one hand, and taketh away in secret with the other." He was permitted to ride his horse unrestrained out through the gates of Annon Forn so as to minimize his humiliation in the face of the populace, but once they were but a few leagues outside the city he was forced to ride to Dol Calantir in bonds. Soon afterwards he was assigned permanent quarters to reside in at the castle of the king. Though his new accommodations were not wholly unfavorable to him (indeed, they bordered on refined elegance when compared to Dol Calantir's deepest dungeon), Gelharm was forced to endure them in solitude and with barred doors and windows.<BR><BR>Soon thereafter Echormoth sent word to Tarandil that an immediate supply of fresh soldiers would be needed to keep law and order in Tharbad; twice the number that Gelharm was known to have at his disposal in the past. The king quickly granted the new mayor's request without delay and less than three months after taking up the mayorship of Tharbad Echormoth had a full force of royal foot-soldiers over five-thousand strong to do his bidding. T'was said that the sound of their iron-soled boots clang loudly in the streets as they marched, often at odd hours of the night. Many believed that Echormoth ordered them to do so for no other reason than to deprive the people of Tharbad of a sound night's sleep, for the soldiers also sang as they went. They were soon known as the 'Lead-foots', and many of the residents came to despise them.
User avatar
Celebrimbor32
Ranger of the North
 
Posts: 1524
Joined: Fri Aug 10, 2001 9:22 pm
Location: U.S.A.
Top

Postby Celebriel_Esgaledhel » Fri Nov 07, 2003 10:44 am

another well written installment, Cel! I really liked this one, expecially how you described Vorondil's family's feelings. I just have a couple thoughts, though you needn't regard them, as they are merely my opinions:<BR><BR><i>...by nearly a third at this time, <b>in part in retaliation</b> of the ban placed upon his son Calimendil...</i><BR><BR>The part I"ve put in boldface is that section I'm wondering about. What you written makes perfect sense, but <i><b>in</b> part <b>in</b> retaliation</i> doesn't quite flow to me. I can't explain things well, but I would write <i>Partly in retaliation</i>, simply because i have a pet peeve for words repeated in a sentence, like "in part in"........<BR><BR><i>...<b>Afterall</b>, all folk...</i><BR><BR>After all.......<BR><BR>
User avatar
Celebriel_Esgaledhel
Ranger of the North

 
Posts: 2338
Joined: Thu Nov 14, 2002 5:32 pm
Location: Varghala
Top

Postby Celebrimbor32 » Mon Nov 10, 2003 10:13 pm

Thanks again, Celeb! At least I know that I have at least two faithful readers out there <img src="http://www.tolkienonline.com/mb/i/expressions/face-icon-small-wink.gif"border=0> To think that I am only about half-way finished! <BR><BR>Good suggestions, btw. I agree with them and will go back and edit very soon.
User avatar
Celebrimbor32
Ranger of the North
 
Posts: 1524
Joined: Fri Aug 10, 2001 9:22 pm
Location: U.S.A.
Top

Postby Celebriel_Esgaledhel » Tue Nov 11, 2003 12:27 pm

<img src="http://www.tolkienonline.com/mb/i/expressions/face-icon-small-happy.gif"border=0> no problem! I'm thoroughly enjoying this story. I have posted my own here, the Hammerhand one, though I haven't posted the second one yet due to a bad case of writer's block<img src="http://www.tolkienonline.com/mb/i/expressions/face-icon-small-rolleyes.gif"border=0>
User avatar
Celebriel_Esgaledhel
Ranger of the North

 
Posts: 2338
Joined: Thu Nov 14, 2002 5:32 pm
Location: Varghala
Top

Postby Celebrimbor32 » Thu Nov 20, 2003 8:13 pm

I finally found your Hammerhand story, Celebriel, though I just had time to skim through it. I promise to read through it thoroughly soon and see if I can come up with any suggestions, etc. <img src="http://www.tolkienonline.com/mb/i/expressions/face-icon-small-smile.gif"border=0>
User avatar
Celebrimbor32
Ranger of the North
 
Posts: 1524
Joined: Fri Aug 10, 2001 9:22 pm
Location: U.S.A.
Top

Postby Celebrimbor32 » Thu Nov 20, 2003 8:25 pm

GREAT FIRE OF REVENGE, pt. II<BR><BR>The dungeons and jails of both Tharbad and Dol Calantir were full in those days. Many men, and not a few women, were rounded up and apprehended by Echormoth’s men. They were hounded (some believed tortured) with questions concerning anything they might know of the various guilds and foreigners in the city and any relationship they might have had with Vorondil. Some, believing themselves to be next on Echormoth’s list of detainees, fled the city without warning. But Echormoth’s spies were aware of them and they tracked them out into the wild and marked with interest which direction their suspects had chosen to flee. Not a mere few chose the southern road that lead through Dunland. <BR><BR>The year 1283 had seen little progress in the case Vorondil. All the while Tarandil grew ever more restless in his lamentations for his missing son, and slowly, but ever more assuredly, his grip upon the control of the wild lands of Minhiriath was fastly deteriorating. Even the crown’s interest in Amon Sûl had waned for a time during this difficult period. But the king had now fixed his imminent gaze upon Tharbad. Tidings from Echormoth in the city arrived at Dol Calantir on a daily basis. Arriana remained at Dol Calantir and occupied much of her time waiting upon her father and tending to his every need. Tarandil had not yet reached a state of dotage, yet Arriana seemed most willing, or even eager, to create a false guise that he had. Rumor had it that she spread exaggerated reports among the court that the king’s health had worsened since the loss of Vorondil. Her reasons for doing so are unclear, though perhaps she desired that the king’s subjects view him upon the verge of senility and unlikely to have the strength to concoct and carry out the necessary plans for the carnage that would soon be reaped upon Tharbad. <BR><BR>Though he was still able-bodied in limb, Tarandil seldom left his estate, for his daughter persuaded him to rest and recuperate in the baths. He was also a regular visitor to the jail of Gelharm. Often times he brought along with him his own personal guards in the middle of the night, and they treated the former mayor harshly, depriving him of sleep and accusing him, wrongly as it were, of lending a hand in the mischief surrounding Vorondil’s disappearance.<BR><BR>Calimendil and Amariel seem to have been almost completely absent from the court during much of this year for reasons unknown. Calimendil was known to have frequented Tharbad at this time, perhaps to aid Echormoth in his tasks of running the city, but it is unlikely that he would have dwelt there for any length of time. Yet two letters between him and his sister Arriana have survived intact, for the two seemed to embark upon a mutual reconciliation after the disappearance of their brother. It is likely that the letters date from this period, for in the letters Calimendil asks his sister to keep his bride-to-be “safe and sound until I return thither to collect her” – an indication that Amariel remained behind at Dol Calantir while he returned to his abode at Metraith alone. Associates of his later related that Calimendil did so out of fear that Amariel’s former suitor and admirer, Girwaedh of Annuminas, had secretly entered Cardolan and sought to infiltrate Calimendil’s home and forcibly remove Amariel and deliver her back to her father in Fornost Erain, where she would be forced to marry him. Yet there is no record that anything of the kind ever transpired.<BR><BR>There then came a night of spring during the year 1284 when the city of Tharbad lie quietly under a cloudless, star-studded sky of black. The moon shone full and bright that evening and the wind blew gently in from the west. With the weather being unseasonable dry the folk of the impoverished little hamlets that lie scattered outside the walls of the Rammas Nín were out and about their dilapidated wooden shacks, for the light of Tilion, Steersman of the Moon, enticed them out of their beds and into the fields. They loved the light of Tilion and took it as a sign of good fortune to come. <BR><BR>An angry old woman stood in front of her broken door to her house with a leather strap in her hand under the moonlight. She swung the strap down as a whip upon a wandering old dog that had stolen what was left of her daily loaf. Dropping the bread, the dog ran off with a cry and limp towards the nearby city gates. Watching the dog flee from her the woman gasped aloud in shock, for the sight she beheld beyond the gates and somewhere inside the darkened city was a thing wholly unlooked for. Thin columns of black smoke rose into the air and mingled with Tilion’s heavenly moonlight. Soon afterwards a large orange glow could be descried as the source of the smoke.<BR><BR>The old woman cried aloud to the peasantry and homeless around her, “Fire! Fire! There is a blaze in the city! Awake my fellows! Tharbad is ablaze! Will no one alert the gatekeepers? Tharbad is burning!” Folk about her went running towards the gates of Rammas Nín to arouse the guards. But not all did. Some there were who stood and watched the blaze grow as the breeze began to fan it from its source to that of yet another, and they smiled. Some laughed aloud, openly proclaiming their wish that the dwelling of Echormoth would be the first to burn to the ground. <BR><BR>Upon both banks of the Gwathló within the city walls nothing had been noticeably different from any other night. Most of the folk still remained indoors during the overnight hours for fear of burglary and molestation while the beggars and rat-catchers of Tharbad went about their nightly rituals, scavenging and hunting in darkened alleys for their nightly keep. The cries of the old woman in the slum-lands outside the walls was heard and taken up by those who dwelt on the north bank of the river, inside the city. They clamored out of their houses and pointed their fingers towards the Isle in alarm. Their peaceful night’s slumber had again been disturbed, but not by the Lead-foots of Echormoth. Fire had indeed struck the heart of the city. <BR><BR>Now Echormoth dwelt upon the north bank of Gwathló nigh an open and treeless park where stood the statue of Tar-Aldarion, and not upon the Isle as Gelharm had before. Rumor of the fire quickly reached the ears of Echormoth’s guards and they roused their master from sleep to relate the news. Echormoth rose from his bed, sleepily gazed out his window and beheld an orange glow from out upon the island. He then assured his guards that it was only a minor blaze, which would be taken care of and extinguished by the guildsmen, for fires of the sort were nothing new in Tharbad. He then dismissed his men and returned to his bed. <BR><BR>Yet this fire was no ordinary blaze like those previous. Whereas fires in the past would accidentally spring up from time to time throughout the city, they were almost always doused with relative ease. But in this case the circumstances conspired against it: a dry spring, the houses mainly made of wood and were close together; some homes left vacant by their occupants spending the weekend outside the city walls; stores full of oil, pitch, hemp, flax and wine, and other readily combustible wares; and a strong wind that carried the fire from roof to roof and from street to street. <BR><BR>Within three quarters of an hour the fire had become ungovernable upon the Isle of Tharbad. The roar of the crackling flames could be heard from both banks of the river by now, but only a few of the folk plucked up enough courage to make their way across the bridges and lend a helping hand. Yet even most of these were turned away by the Lead-foots who manned and guarded the bridges and they were prevented from accessing the Isle, for the guards claimed that they needed no assistance and would prevent the looting of the mercantiles and other establishments on the Isle. <BR><BR>Less than an hour later the fire spread so quickly that the entire north end of the Isle was ablaze. The fire created such a glow of bright orange that a great deal of the residents of the city had risen from sleep to watch the dreadful proceedings out upon the Isle. By now the city’s mayor was up and out of his house and ordering his men out across the north bridge to the Isle to lend what hand they could in preventing the spreading of the fire. Now the main road that ran north and south through the realm also went through Tharbad, which in turn dissected the Isle in half as it continued to the opposite end of the city. The fire had started in a quadrant upon the northern side, but it had spread so quickly and with such force that soon the southern end was threatened as well. Echormoth wished to prevent the blockage of the road through the Isle at all costs and ordered all worthy men in his service to the Isle henceforth. But they were too late. The island’s largest most extravagant Inn quickly fell prey to the flames, and stood between the old theatre and the stables upon the southern half of the Isle. The entire Isle of Tharbad soon fell into peril of conflagration. <BR><BR>The folk that could access the bridges, and were near them as the inferno grew, hastily made their way to either the north or south bank of the river. Yet many locals and visitors upon the Isle found themselves trapped and beyond all aid, and many threw themselves into the river, having no other recourse. Some made their way to the docks and found boats already manned and waiting to take them away from the Isle. Others were said to have refused any more passengers for fear of capsizing, and as a result quarrels and scuffles erupted among them. Some of the less palatable men of the Isle forcibly tossed women and children from the vessels and left them behind as they made their own way to safety. Of the events that ensued that night one witness later wrote:<BR><BR>“…where we beheld….the entire Isle from end to end in dreadful flames near the waterside; the despondency of people therein did not abate with the coming of the soldiery, who hardly stirred to quench it. The sky was of a fiery aspect, like the top of a burning oven….The noise and cracking and thunder of the impetuous flames, the shrieking and hurrying of the people, the falling of houses and buildings was like a hideous storm; and the air all about so hot….that we were forced to stand still and let the flames burn on as we watched….Men leaped from burning docks into the river. Others ran from doorways with their bodies all ablaze with fire and drenched themselves in the canals for relief….We saw the Gwathló covered with goods floating, barges and boats laden with what some had time and courage to save….Some from our southern bank oared their small boats out across the river to the Isle to perform a rescue; yet others there were who turned their backs on the calamity in unfeeling candor. Never before had any beheld such a civic carnage in the city....”<BR><BR>The loss and devastation was severe. Death found its way around the Isle with unbridled restraint. The largest jail in Tharbad was located upon the Isle and, at the time, was filled with some five and twenty prisoners, all of whom were forgotten and remained incarcerated during the whole of the fire. In vain did they plead through their barred windows for aid from the panic-stricken folk that dashed hither and thither through the streets. Yet the noxious smoke filled their lungs wantonly and ere long they succumbed to the flames. <BR>
User avatar
Celebrimbor32
Ranger of the North
 
Posts: 1524
Joined: Fri Aug 10, 2001 9:22 pm
Location: U.S.A.
Top

Postby Celebrimbor32 » Sun Dec 07, 2003 1:40 pm

GREAT FIRE OF REVENGE, pt. III<BR><BR>Most of the carnage had been wreaked upon the guilds, in the northern quadrant of the Isle. Guilds such as the Brotherhood of Brewers, the Cardolan Granary, Wainwrights of Tharbad and the Smiths of the Heavy-Hand all suffered heavy losses. Yet, most notably, it was the Guild of the Greyflood that suffered most of all. Their warehouses were all but consumed and kindled. Most of their docks, boats and barges were destroyed. Not a few of the loyal members of the guild burned to death defending their precious hideouts and fortunes. But Urlin was not there; nor was it known to where he had fled, for he covered his tracks skillfully.<BR><BR>The fire upon the Isle of Tharbad was far worse than anything seen in the city before it’s time. Though even the new mayor and many of his ranks sought to quell the flames with what meager means they could they managed only in preventing the fire from reaching the bridges and spreading further into the city. <BR><BR>After two days the fire had burned itself out. Echormoth at last gained access to the Isle and roamed the streets in company with his personal guard. Dogs were sent into various burned out structures to search for survivors amid the carnage. Some they found alive submerged beneath the weight of fallen walls or roofs, which in fact may have been their salvation, for it prevented the flames from scorching them to their deaths. Yet most of the bodies of the victims were charred beyond recognition. Some bodies were found floating face downwards in the canals or the banks of the river. Of the prisoners that had been trapped in their jail cells all had perished. <BR><BR>The entire northern quadrant of the Isle was in a state of obliteration. Nary a single structure remained standing after the cooling of the fire save a few modest structures here and there made of stone. Yet after the last smoldering embers of the fire had died out and Echormoth’s own councilmen inspected the damage for themselves a handful of eyewitnesses reported to them that they had seen the fire begin inside a tavern. When Echormoth asked which tavern it may have been, for there were several upon the Isle, all told him it was the Isle of Ale tavern, which was in part owned and operated by Urlin, the Dunlending. It was also the last place where Vorondil, son of Tarandil, had been seen alive. <BR><BR>Let posterity make of this what it will. Yet with the destruction of the Guild of the Greyflood and the presumption of some that Urlin may have perished in the flames, it may be that one or more of the eye-witnesses of that unfortunate night, where Vorondil met his end at the point of a knife, may have found in themselves a renewed courage and at last had come forward with a true account of the murders of Vorondil and his men. There was certainly a reward offered to any who came forth with true tidings of the whereabouts of the king’s heir or his apparent fate. If any did indeed come forth it has never been revealed and was more than likely suppressed by Echormoth by order of the king. Yet not even this clue can be relied upon too heavily, for Tarandil was not a well-loved king by the folk of Tharbad, and it may be that few folk therein trusted his promise of a reward and may have felt unsympathetic towards the king’s personal loss. <BR><BR>Now Urlin had fled Tharbad well before the Great Fire of 1284. Only once did he return to Tharbad following the murder of Vorondil two years before. He had removed all traces of himself from the Guild of the Greyflood and departed the city under disguise. By little-used and lonely paths did he make his way south and eastwards through the wild until he came into Dunland, his homeland. There he remained for some time under the protection of the chieftains of that land. <BR><BR>Urlin feared to return again to Tharbad while Tarandil was king. When his spies told him of the great fire that had consumed nearly all the Isle he was filled with dismay. When he learned that the fire was believed to have begun right in his very own Isle of Ale Tavern he was wrathful, for the Guild of the Greyflood was now gone, as were their warehouses and docks and many of their boats and valuable cargo. Its heyday was now past. It would not rise again. The king would see to that. Yet Urlin sat long in his meager dwelling in the foothills of the Misty Mountains and contemplated vengeance. <BR><BR>After several months had passed he sent word to his rivals among the other former guilds in Tharbad that a unification amongst themselves should take place at once. Secretly, delegates from both the Thieves Guild and the Guild of Masons traveled to Dunland to meet with Urlin to hear him speak his mind. Soon a new and powerful, yet more fearful guild would be formed. The Assassin’s Guild it was known to most in later days. Their chief and sole motive for existence was to seek revenge against Dol Calantir and the house of Tarandil, king of Cardolan. Long did they thrive and exist in Tharbad. Even after the line of kings failed at the last and no claimant to the throne could be agreed upon by one prince or the other, the Assassin’s Guild retained a firm toehold upon power in the city. They desired no less than the death of Tarandil and all his line. Urlin openly accused the king of starting the deadly fire upon the Isle. <BR><BR>It was said that Tarandil said very little when word of the horrendous fire reached him back at Dol Calantir. Nor did he send any aid to the city for the fire’s quelling or assistance for the sick and wounded. He may have even smiled to himself upon hearing the tidings as he walked through his favorite garden under the moonlight with his daughter, or perhaps dined with his guests from abroad upon his favorite summer balcony. No faithful account or record of it has been handed down. Messages from King Celebrindor in Fornost were sent to Tarandil expressing concern and even outrage over the news of the Great Fire, for Tharbad was an important center for commerce and trade for Arthedain as well as their neighbor to the south. Yet for some there was little doubt that mischief was afoot among the nobility of Cardolan. <BR><BR>Some months after the Great Fire Echormoth requested from the king that he be sent a fresh supply of bodyguards from Dol Calantir every fortnight for fear of treachery among them. As long as he openly proclaimed his close ties to king Tarandil Echormoth knew that his life was in danger so long as he continued to act as mayor of Tharbad, for many held him as an accomplice of the king. <BR><BR>At this time the Lead-foots of Tharbad stepped up their rigorous harassment and suspicious inquiries of all folk who were known to have spoken ill of Echormoth or the king; and always they asked for news of Urlin. Prince Calimendil was often seen in the city at this time assisting the mayor in the rebuilding of the ruined Isle and spending many nights with Echormoth as his guest. <BR><BR>A new labor was commissioned by the king now. All of the most skilled engineers of Cardolan were sent into the city to rebuild the Isle even more luxuriously than it had been before the Great Fire. Upon the far northern end of the Isle, where once the warehouses of the Guild of the Greyflood had stood, a grand stone castle was erected inside a walled compound. Here the mayor of Tharbad would take up his residence in the years to come. <BR><BR>Yet for Tarandil, his mood did not soften or mollify in the years immediately proceeding the deadly disaster in Tharbad. Only the marriage of his son Calimendil and Amariel the following year brought out any brief semblance of joy in him, for few true tidings of the final fate of Vorondil, the king’s heir, ever came to Tarandil while his years lasted, save those that were proved false. It was not long afterwards that the king decreed it a crime punishable by death to “…propagate counterfactual, erroneous or untrue claims…” concerning the fate of his eldest and most beloved son. Coincidentally, all false tidings of Vorondil soon ceased. <BR><BR>His name passed into an uncertain legend of mystery and forgetfulness. Alas for Vorondil!
User avatar
Celebrimbor32
Ranger of the North
 
Posts: 1524
Joined: Fri Aug 10, 2001 9:22 pm
Location: U.S.A.
Top

Postby Celebriel_Esgaledhel » Tue Dec 16, 2003 10:56 am

Ah, another fine installment! Well done! I especially liked your vivid description of the fire.<BR><BR>Dorry I haven't popped in here for a while; i've been quite busy with my own stories (trust me, they need work!<img src="http://www.tolkienonline.com/mb/i/expressions/face-icon-small-rolleyes.gif"border=0>) I'm quite caught up in your theme - once again, well written!<BR><BR>I seldom read fanfiction for LotR, for they tend to be written in poor style, something I wouldn't want to associate with TOlkien's works. But yours is great! I am thoroughly enjoying it!
User avatar
Celebriel_Esgaledhel
Ranger of the North

 
Posts: 2338
Joined: Thu Nov 14, 2002 5:32 pm
Location: Varghala
Top

Postby rowanberry » Thu Dec 18, 2003 10:45 am

I second Celebriel's opinion - you're writing a story that is interesting and realistic enough. I feel that I'm really reading the writings of some ancient chronicler. (I don't read much fanfiction either, BTW - most of it tends to be quite stupid.)<BR><BR>In this installment though, it's just me <img src="http://www.tolkienonline.com/mb/i/expressions/face-icon-small-blush.gif"border=0> but, the Guild of Assassins reminded me of some of Terry Pratchett's Discworld novels, my favorites in the humoristic fantasy section.
User avatar
rowanberry
+++Out Of Cheese Error+++


 
Posts: 20480
Joined: Thu Apr 11, 2002 12:26 am
Location: Back row of the chorus in a silly Bollywood movie
Top

Postby Celebrimbor32 » Fri Dec 19, 2003 12:55 pm

Much thanks to both of you! It certainly is a lot of fun, attempting to create an alternative history to a part of Tolkien's legacy that he never fully revealed to the reader....Furthermore, I'm relieved to hear that Ilran is a believable and authentic scribe recording an important event in ME's history. I figured it might be a bit more interesting to tell the tale through the eyes and ears of a third person for a change.<BR><BR>Incidently, I agree that the majority of Tolkien fan-fiction (at least from what I have glimpsed at) is mostly rubbish. However, if you look hard enough you come across a few good tales every once in a great while. There is a story in the Reading Room (I forget the author's screen-name) about the history of Sauron entitled, <i>The Corruption of Sauron</i>. I highly recommend it. Two thumbs up! ...At some point, after my story is complete I will go back and edit and post it up in the Reading Room <img src="http://www.tolkienonline.com/mb/i/expressions/face-icon-small-smile.gif"border=0>
User avatar
Celebrimbor32
Ranger of the North
 
Posts: 1524
Joined: Fri Aug 10, 2001 9:22 pm
Location: U.S.A.
Top

Postby Celebrimbor32 » Fri Dec 26, 2003 10:24 pm

ARRIANA AND A SCANDAL AVERTED, Pt. I<BR><BR>The lives and events of the troubled and mirthless people of Tharbad flowed onwards upon their respective courses with uncertainty after the Great Fire. Yet ere long the engineers and craftsmen of Echormoth had the foundations of the new Isle laid and set for the future of a new Tharbad. The city upon both banks of the river was as it ever had been, but men tore down many old houses and buildings that seemed suspect and prone to fire. In their place stone or brick structures were raised in between the traditional wooden ones. Such a horrific calamity would never assail that city again (*)<BR><BR>Yet the world outside the city walls of the Rammas Nín was restless. The rugged country of Rhudaur, ever the malcontent of the realm of Arnor, raged ever more exceedingly with tumult and unruliness. Reports became frequent among those of Tarandil’s court that Celebrindor had only recently sent a force of men across the Hoarwell and into Rhudaur to confront and assault more Hillmen there. Rumors of men of foreign races from across the mountains had been seen as of late entering northern Eriador by way of the high passes; travelers were being harassed upon the old east-west highway that ran through Eriador; and orcs had even been seen by some daring to assault the free-folk who used the high mountain passes to the north in ever greater numbers. These tales worried the farmers and other rural folk of northern Cardolan greatly and they shut themselves inside their homes after dusk and did not emerge again until dawn.<BR><BR>Amid the people’s worries at this time there was at least some cause for joy, for in the summer of the year 1287 Calimendil and Amariel were at last wed in a small but ornate ceremony at the royal court. Now Calimendil would have had the ceremony at his own dwelling at Metraith upon the South Downs, but in reverence of his father and all of the emotional turmoil he had undergone in the preceding years with the disappearance of Vorondil, he relented and settled upon Dol Calantir. <BR><BR>In a gesture of goodwill towards Vorondil Calimendil and Amariel referred all their nuptial gifts and monetary tributes to Dol Argond, Vorondil’s castle upon the western banks of the Greyflood. Vorondil had been missing for over five years now, and most had little doubt that he had been dead for some time, though his body had never been found. Nevertheless, Calimendil rose up his goblet of wine before all the court and the king and toasted to his brother as if he were standing before him. Though his voice trembled with emotion, he exclaimed aloud, “To my dearest brother and friend! Though thou art absent now from us here thy presence is clearly felt. From the shepherds and farmers in the north to the merchants and traders in the south, thy lofty influence has left its mark upon thy countrymen! Let them say not that thou art gone! Ye are always in the hearts and minds of thy family and friends. I know not what fate O mighty doom has planned for me, nor if my span of years shall be long or short. Yet whatever deeds of worth I may accomplish in my day they shall be performed in thy memory as thou would have surely done thyself in due time!”<BR><BR>Arriana had sat next to her father during the grand supper after the wedding reception of her brother. Mostly she had sat quietly and listened to the toasts of the various guests in the hall patiently, but with downcast eyes. Yet when Calimendil finished his toast to their absent brother she looked suddenly up at him. His final remark struck her as odd and even suspicious, and she wondered to herself if there was a hidden meaning laying beneath them somewhere. <BR><BR>When Calimendil had finished his toast to Vorondil he made to sit down again next to Amariel, but stopped short and added, turning towards Tarandil, “And let us not forget the name of the Dunlending that brought much woe and grief to our family and country, oh father! Let all present here at the king’s court remember the name of Urlin! That mischief-maker and instigator of malice from Dunland. There can be little doubt that he was chiefly responsible for Vorondil’s disappearance and the Great Fire of Tharbad a couple years ago. We shall deal with him when the opportunity arises!” At this, two of the nobles that sat at the table lifted up their glasses in agreement, saying, “Here, here! Let Urlin beware!” They were Frothgar, lord of the king’s masons, and Iliandor, my grandfather.<BR><BR>Tarandil had already begun to look more than his true age by this time. The loss of his wife and eldest son, and the stress of ruling a realm in constant conflict with her neighbors and her own capital city had begun to cast down his once unquenchable fierceness of personal will and incentive to rule Cardolan with a fair and even hand. In the years before the death of Elenarian he had embraced his own lust and avarice for power, deeming such desires a healthy trait for a successful king. Yet now he began to look upon his rule as a wearisome burden and he shifted more responsibilities onto his councilmen. <BR><BR>Arriana spent even more time with her father in the next year after her brother’s wedding. The king became gradually more nervous and was beset with paranoia. He discontinued the service of many of his servants, claiming that they had chosen to befriend Gelharm, the imprisoned former mayor of Tharbad, and were conspiring together to poison him. Therefore Gelharm was removed from his comfortable prison and placed in the lower dungeons that were cold and damp, and he shared his new accommodations with skeletons and rats. The king went often at times down into the dungeon alone to interrogate Gelharm regarding the disappearance of Vorondil, which was now well-nigh six years gone. Always Gelharm implicated Urlin in the matter, but begged the king to believe him that he had no knowledge whatsoever of Vorondil’s fate. <BR><BR>Prisoners sent from Echormoth in Tharbad began to be transported to Dol Calantir by order of the king. Most were nothing more than common urban thieves or river-smugglers, but Tarandil accused them of seditious acts by having dealings with men who sought to re-establish the Guild of the Greyflood, which was now outlawed in Tharbad. They were taken into the outer courtyards and hanged one at a time for treason. Even some of the royal magnates and princes of the northern fiefdoms of Cardolan were accused of negligence of their duties and “failing to maintain a diligent and guarded presence upon the river in the north”. The king claimed that spies from Rhudaur were navigating their boats down the Hoarwell and were stealing their way into Tharbad to stir up trouble. An order of arrest was issued for a certain Grimnor of Lostriand (**), who was a merchant prince. He was to appear before the royal council and give an account of himself, but was said to have fled when word of his impending arrest reached him. He eluded capture by securing secret harborage for himself among various farmers and landowners in the countryside. <BR><BR>There came a time in the following winter when Tarandil began to show signs of sickness. By mid-October snow and wind came out of the north with great ferocity and covered much of Cardolan under a blanket of white. Even as far south as Tharbad. The king now walked with the aid of a staff and many of his advisors began to feel that his span of years was coming to its end. During council meetings and while giving his speeches he was constantly interrupted by fits of cough. He frequently complained of headaches and soreness in his feet, which had begun to swell. He spent more of his time in the warmth of the steam baths and began to drink a great deal of herbalized tea (which, in great irony, he had procured from Tharbad, which in turn was imported from Arthedain). Arriana insisted to him that she be allowed to summon the healers from Tharbad to attend on their king in his need, but Tarandil refused to allow it, claiming that the folk of Tharbad had always hated him and would surely use such an opportunity to poison him. He was probably right. Yet when rumor of the king’s poor health reached the ears of those in Tharbad a great many of them rejoiced, hoping that their hated king would soon perish.<BR><BR>One winter night when the winds howled outside his bedroom window he lay in his bed in great weariness and pain. Calling out to his daughter to come close to him Arriana kneeled as she held her father’s hand. His aids were asked to leave the room while he spoke privately with her. As she leaned close to him he spoke to her, “Alas, my dearest daughter! My day hath come at last, or so it now seemeth. My health fails me and soon I will lie next to thy mother in the barrows of Tyrn Gorthad. I am bereft of happiness nowadays. The loss of Vorondil inflicted a mortal wound upon my spirit that shall only be cured by the all-healing grave.”<BR><BR>Then Arriana tearfully kissed her father’s hand and replied, “I say that it is not so, father! You cannot leave your country kingless so soon. Your doom has not called upon you yet. This is but another malady that ye must overcome in order to reap the joy ye shall one day have after the birth of thy first grandchild, for Amariel hath conceived already. She confided in me only yesterday. Do not give up on thyself, I beg you!”<BR><BR>“That is well, indeed,” replied the sickly king with a trace of a smile, “Thy tidings cometh too late, alas!” Then Tarandil pulled his daughter very close to him and whispered in her ear, saying, “It was I, Arriana…Two years ago; it was I who gave the order to burn the city to the ground. May Eru be merciful on me! I dreamt that Vorondil wandered through shadowy streets late at night and was lured into a trap inside a den of degradation where he was stabbed to death! They had to be punished. I tell you this now, for thou shalt soon be the first ruling Queen of Cardolan, for thou are older than Calimendil and next in line in succession to my throne.”<BR><BR>What Arriana may have thought about her father’s confession to her in his final hours, or so it seemed to him, is uncertain. Yet it is highly probable that she already had knowledge of her father’s orders after the events occurred, though there is no record of Tarandil confessing the fact to her or Calimendil. Or she may have at least guessed the truth. His closest advisors would have had full knowledge of the impending fire in Tharbad well before hand; of that there is little doubt. But they took that secret to their graves. Indeed, the secret would never have been known to history if the king had not revealed it to Arriana, who in turn later revealed it to Calimendil.<BR><BR>(*)<i>This, of course, is an assumption made by the author without foreknowledge of the final demise and flooding of Tharbad which occurred many years after Ilran's death.</i><BR><BR>(**)<i>Remote region of Cardolan bounded to the north and east by the great east-west road and the Metheithel river respectively.
User avatar
Celebrimbor32
Ranger of the North
 
Posts: 1524
Joined: Fri Aug 10, 2001 9:22 pm
Location: U.S.A.
Top

Postby Denethor » Sat Dec 27, 2003 4:49 am

Finally I get an opportunity to catch up on this story! <img src="http://www.tolkienonline.com/mb/i/expressions/face-icon-small-smile.gif"border=0><BR><BR>It really is excellent thus far; I like the general atmosphere of death and darkness that has recently descended on the story (I've got a bit of a morbid personality <img src="http://www.tolkienonline.com/mb/i/expressions/face-icon-small-happy.gif"border=0>). I now see what you meant about the Fire of Tharbad being influenced by the Great Fire of London - especially with little details like the mayor going back to bed thinking it was only a minor blaze.
User avatar
Denethor
Ranger of the North

 
Posts: 4537
Joined: Fri Dec 01, 2000 9:33 pm
Location: New Zealand
Top

Postby Celebrimbor32 » Sun Dec 28, 2003 4:29 pm

Thanks a ton, Denethor! <img src="http://www.tolkienonline.com/mb/i/expressions/face-icon-small-smile.gif"border=0> Glad you like it. Yes, I admit that the part about the mayor waking up at the begining of the Great Fire then going back to bed was inspired by the Great Fire of London in 1666. But then again, Tolkien raided the tale of Beowulf (or I should say 'borrowed') and used some of those ideas for his great Trilogy, so I don't see any harm in that. <img src="http://www.tolkienonline.com/mb/i/expressions/face-icon-small-wink.gif"border=0> Makes you wonder how any of us can be <i>completely</i> original anymore!
User avatar
Celebrimbor32
Ranger of the North
 
Posts: 1524
Joined: Fri Aug 10, 2001 9:22 pm
Location: U.S.A.
Top

Postby Celebrimbor32 » Tue Jan 06, 2004 8:59 pm

ARRIANA AND A SCANDAL AVERTED, Pt. II<BR><BR>Yet the king did not die. His health slowly began to improve again after his fever broke on the night of his alleged confession to his daughter. Ere long he was back on his feet, though in moderation only. He claimed to everyone gathered at his court that he felt a new vigor and strength within him, and officially proclaimed himself well again. He immediately had word sent to Echormoth in Tharbad of his recovery. In turn Echormoth sent him his congratulations. Much of the populace of Tharbad was either disappointed and cursed the news or merely shrugged their shoulders in indifference.<BR><BR>The following month of December found the king in higher spirits, though his appearance continued to change. Whereas in the years before the death of Vorondil he had always preferred his face to be devoid of facial hair, he now let his beard grow long. As long as the beards of the dwarves it was, and it became white. He rarely went far without his bodyguard and always took his staff to lean upon when he became weary. As one of his last decrees of his life (for so it proved) he ordered that a new tax be placed upon the ranchers and shepherds in the north that did not consent to supply the crown with at least half of their mares or newborn foals that they produced. Those that were in compliance with the new decree were allowed exemption. There was a great need of horses at that time, for many of the royal steeds had become sick with disease and a large number of them had died. Tarandil accused the merchants of Tharbad of supplying Dol Calantir with poisoned oats and grain, which were fed to the horses. Others among the king’s privy council argued that the men of Dunland tampered with the feed so as to disable the horsemen of Cardolan. The matter was left unresolved.<BR><BR>Shortly thereafter, the king announced that he would visit Tharbad during the midwinter celebrations for Yule. His advisors sought to dissuade him from the notion, citing his poor health and the danger of it, but the king insisted. The holiday had lost much of its significance over the ages. It had not the same enthusiasm in Cardolan as it had in neighboring Arthedain, but was still formally observed throughout the realm nonetheless. Travelers and merchants from abroad entered into the city in abundance at this time of year, and as an inevitable result many unsavory and foul folk did as well. In an effort to halt this problem Echormoth tripled the entry fees and tolls into the city. His Lead-foots were ever vigilant during the Yule.<BR><BR>When Tarandil entered Tharbad with Calimendil and Amariel and his daughter Arriana at his side, Echormoth was already at the gates of the Annon Forn to greet them. It marked Tarandil’s first appearance in the city since shortly after he departed following his ambassadorship, more than seventy years beforehand. As expected he was coolly received by many of the residents, but the king seemed to take little notice of it. No one dared jeer or scoff directly at the king while he was in company of his children for fear of reprimand from Echormoth after the king had departed. <BR><BR>Tarandil was lead through the snowy city streets in honor by his hosts that crisp winter day. A horse-drawn carriage had been offered to him as a matter of course (and much advised by Calimendil and Arriana), but the king refused, preferring to walk and show the populace that his health had not deteriorated since his previous illness the month before, though he now relied heavily upon his staff. He told them, “I shall exhibit as such a strong pertinacity that it shall send the Dunlendings scampering! Let them run willy-nilly back to their groveling ways among their own kind in Dunland!” <BR><BR>At length Tarandil and his attendants were shown across the North Bridge, which had not been tended to since Vorondil had begun his repairs upon it during his final visit to the city six years previous. When they came out upon the great Isle of Tharbad Tarandil saw the obvious signs that a great conflagration had occurred there long before. Much progress had been made in the Isle’s reconstruction since the fire, though it was far from complete. The king then asked to be shown the location where Urlin’s tavern had stood before it was burned to the ground in the Great Fire of 1284. All that was left of it was a wall that was blackened and charred and part of the floor, which was now covered with a light frosting of snow. Had he known that he was standing in the exact spot where his son met his untimely end six years before he might have wept. But Tarandil could not have known. <BR><BR>In the evening Echormoth held a feast in honor of the King within the new castle upon the Isle. Many folk from various regions were in attendance that wintry night. The men that headed the guilds of the city were there with their wives or mistresses at the tables, as were merchants and tradesmen from Arthedain. Even representatives of the Dunlendings of Tharbad were present. Though the latter was only a small minority in the city, they had long ago openly disavowed Urlin and other such ruffians that elected to run their organizations by fear, intimidation and violence. They had sworn their allegiance to the King of Cardolan and had proved faithful. <BR><BR>During the feast Tarandil had eaten little and had begun to cough and wheeze. Despite this he consumed his regular allotment of wine. His cough grew gradually worse. Arriana, who sat close beside him as usual, asked him if he would like to retire to his room early to rest. But Tarandil insisted on remaining at the table with “his guests.” When the moment at last came for him to make his traditional toast to the prosperity of the united realm of Arnor he felt his body shivering as with cold. He could not even rise from his chair now, and he began to spit blood. By now it became obvious that the king’s health was in peril. He made a sudden effort to stand on his own but collapsed in a heap, and would have smite the floor had not Iliandor caught him in time. <BR><BR>More blood spewed out from his mouth as he coughed, staining his beard red. Calimendil and Arriana raised Tarandil up and desperately sought to calm him, but the king continued to shiver. They immediately carried their father out of the hall and into a private chamber that had been decorated and prepared for his own personal use. Iliandor and the king’s closest aids quickly rushed into the room and shut the doors behind them. <BR><BR>Back in the hall Echormoth sought in vain to assure all those present that the king, though certainly ill once again, would make a swift recovery, and in the morning depart. But the dinner guests were not so easily fooled and many of them began to murmur and wonder aloud if Cardolan was about to have its first ruling Queen in Arriana. Some members of the feast quickly left the castle and departed, eager to be the first to spread the tidings of the king’s impending death abroad. Others hounded the mayor with questions. <BR><BR>The remainder simply shrugged their shoulders and finished their supper. <BR><BR>As the night deepened outside and the winds seized the snow and tossed it about in frozen gusts against the windows of the castle, Tarandil lay in his bed at death’s door. In desperation Calimendil and Arriana, son and daughter of the king, hastily sent for the healers of Tharbad to be admitted to the king’s chamber to apply their remedies. Though the king had lost consciousness a certain Guinalon, a healer of the city, applied his potions and wrapped the king’s neck in a plaster wrap of wet birch leaves. At length, the remedy seemed to work, for the king awoke from unconsciousness and wearily clasped the hands of both his children. But their hope was only fleeting. His final hour was at hand. Yet, ere his body was spent, he whispered to them something inaudible, which none but the two siblings seemed to have heard or understood, and much strife and disagreement has come of it ever since. <BR><BR>Then Tarandil, fourth King of Cardolan closed his eyes and died. So he ended, in the final week of the year 1288 of the Third Age of our Middle-earth in the very city that he had loathed. He avoided Tharbad for over seventy years until the death of his eldest son, whereupon the thought of Tharbad seldom left his mind, for the city had claimed them both in the end. Tarandil was not the best loved of Cardolan’s few kings, yet he was perhaps its most peaceful. And its wealthiest. Tarandil brought Cardolan to the height of its power. He limited the authority of the princes and divided the lands to encourage large scale breeding of sheep. Providing bounties to the guilds who would work the wool and the merchants who would export it, he revived Cardolan’s economy; yet he also used this as an excuse to raise the taxes upon Tharbad and much of the rural populace, therefore earning their wrath.
User avatar
Celebrimbor32
Ranger of the North
 
Posts: 1524
Joined: Fri Aug 10, 2001 9:22 pm
Location: U.S.A.
Top

Postby Celebriel_Esgaledhel » Thu Jan 08, 2004 12:36 pm

I liked this latest installment, Cel. You described the death of the king quite well, in my opinion, and I was caught up in it. I have only one question:<BR><BR><i> The holiday had lost much of its significance over the ages. It had not the same enthusiasm in Cardolan as it had in neighboring Arthedain, but was still formally observed in Tharbad nonetheless.</i><BR><BR>Here it was not clear to me whether you meant that Cardolan didn't have any enthusiasm about the holiday, or that Tharbad didn't have as much enthusiasm as did the other two countries. I assume you meant the latter, but the way you phrased it was a little confusing. Did you mean, "It had not the same enthusiasm in Cardolan as it had in neighboring Arthedain, <i>and</i> was still..." or "It had not the same enthusiasm in Tharbad as it did in Arthedain and Cardolan, but it was still formally observed." or "It had not the same enthusiasm as it had in neighboring Arthedain or even Tharbad, where it was still formally observed."<BR><BR>I might just be rambling on in nonsense, but nonetheless I was slightly unsure on the meaning of that sentence. <BR><BR>Again, well written! I like the very historically correct format you present the story in, rather than more informal
User avatar
Celebriel_Esgaledhel
Ranger of the North

 
Posts: 2338
Joined: Thu Nov 14, 2002 5:32 pm
Location: Varghala
Top

Postby Celebrimbor32 » Thu Jan 08, 2004 8:42 pm

<i>....the way you phrased it was a little confusing. Did you mean, "It had not the same enthusiasm in Cardolan as it had in neighboring Arthedain, and was still..." or "It had not the same enthusiasm in Tharbad as it did in Arthedain and Cardolan, but it was still formally observed."</i><BR><BR>>> Thanks, Celeb. Good point here....Actually, I meant the former explanation that you have given; that Yule was was still formally observed in Cardolan and Tharbad, but not as enthusiastically as in Arthedain. I'll go back and try and make that a little more clear. <BR><BR>From what I can estimate, I would say that I am now just a little over half-way finished with this tale of mine. Thanks for reading <img src="http://www.tolkienonline.com/mb/i/expressions/face-icon-small-smile.gif"border=0>
User avatar
Celebrimbor32
Ranger of the North
 
Posts: 1524
Joined: Fri Aug 10, 2001 9:22 pm
Location: U.S.A.
Top

Postby rowanberry » Sat Jan 10, 2004 12:33 pm

Enjoyable reading, again. <img src="http://www.tolkienonline.com/mb/i/expressions/face-icon-small-smile.gif"border=0><BR><BR>One detail that especially caught my attention was the horses getting sick and dying, and the reasons that were suspected. I don't know if you got the inspiration from this, but:<BR><BR>In the 1930s in the Soviet Union, a great number of horses suddenly died of some mysterious illness. Stalin, in his paranoia, accused the veterinarians for letting the animals die instead of healing them, and thereby sabotaging the agricultural production, and many were sentenced to death. Later, it came out that, the illness was caused by fodder that was infested with a toxic mold due to inappropriate storage conditions.
User avatar
rowanberry
+++Out Of Cheese Error+++


 
Posts: 20480
Joined: Thu Apr 11, 2002 12:26 am
Location: Back row of the chorus in a silly Bollywood movie
Top

Postby Celebrimbor32 » Sat Jan 10, 2004 8:00 pm

Interesting factoid about Stalin and those horses all those years ago, rowanberry! But I have never heard about that before now. Scout's honor! ....Just another example how it's almost impossible for any of us to be 100% original in anything we come up with anymore. Even when you think you have come up with something really unique and original you are proven wrong, alas. <img src="http://www.tolkienonline.com/mb/i/expressions/face-icon-small-sad.gif"border=0><BR><BR>Thanks for reading, though. Stay tuned, as there's plenty more to come!
User avatar
Celebrimbor32
Ranger of the North
 
Posts: 1524
Joined: Fri Aug 10, 2001 9:22 pm
Location: U.S.A.
Top

Postby Celebrimbor32 » Sat Jan 24, 2004 10:46 pm

ARRIANA AND A SCANDAL AVERTED, pt. III<BR><BR>Soon after the death of Tarandil Calimendil began to order all things as he would, though in truth such a degree of authority was premature and not yet permitted to him under Cardolani law. Yet he and Arriana, along with the King’s closest advisors, took their father’s body out of the city in secret and under cover of nightfall ere any final word of the demise of Tarandil reached the ears of the guests at the King’s table that night. Calimendil then ordered Echormoth to suppress all knowledge of the King’s death from the people of Tharbad until he received orders to the contrary directly from Dol Calantir. But Echormoth insisted that the King’s collapse was beheld by all in attendance at the dinner that night. Many tongues would be wagging and eager to spread the rumor. “Tell them,” said Calimendil gravely, “that his condition is stable, but precarious. Let them guess at it amongst themselves, for I care not. My father’s passing must not be revealed to any of our foes inside or out of Cardolan until a new King is crowned.”<BR><BR>On the morning of the last day of the year 1288 King Tarandil was taken to Tyrn Gorthad and laid to rest in an adjoining mound next to Queen Elenarian, who had passed away twelve years before. The two remaining children of Tarandil and Elenarian made the difficult journey through deep snow and harsh winds to the burial mounds in the north bearing their father’s body. Only a small retinue of friends and councilors from court accompanied them. In this manner they hoped to avoid being seen by prying eyes. <BR><BR>Arriana shed many a tear after the death of her father. Being now bereft of parents, and having one sibling only left to her for comfort of kin, she sought out Calimendil regularly while at court in the days immediately following the death of the king. She felt keenly the heavy responsibility that was now laid upon her as the King’s heir. By right, the throne of Cardolan would be hers. Though, throughout all the years of the kingdom of Arnor, never had any of the sister-realms been ruled by a Queen alone. Arriana would be the first to do so, for she had as yet no husband. The opportunity for her was very great, and she began to long for the chance to prove her worth as Tarandil’s heir and become the first ruling Queen. But fear of so difficult a duty aroused incertitude within her heart. She went to great measures to conceal her self-doubt to all, but it quickly became apparent to many among the court. <BR><BR>Many of the older men among Tarandil’s advisors did not wish to see Arriana ascend to the throne. They held secret councils amongst themselves in the middle of the night in the private chambers of Dol Calantir. Calimendil was even summoned to them, though he later disclaimed their significance to later events. Amariel had always denied her husband’s attendance at such meetings. Nevertheless, Arriana soon opened her heart to her brother and proclaimed her intention to accept the honor of becoming Cardolan’s first ruling Queen. There were not a few among the nobles at court who also desired such a transformation to take place, for they had become close to Arriana in the years since Vorondil’s disappearance. Indeed, there is no evidence that concludes that Calimendil desired the throne for himself at this time, and may have even welcomed his sister’s ascension. Yet fate again played its part and prevented any such happenstance from taking place.<BR><BR>The first days of the New Year were troubled ones for all at court, for not only did the realm have no official absolute ruler to govern its people, but rumor of the death of the King had now spread not only from the streets of Tharbad and the fields in the north, but also to Celebrindor in Fornost Erain. If the king of Arthedain were to sense the disunion and confusion of his southern neighbors he would certainly use such an opportunity to seize full control of Amon Sûl and even the Palantir. The nobles of Dol Calantir surely were aware of this. An official announcement would have to be made very soon.<BR><BR>In the second week of the new year of 1289 Arriana gathered the members of the royal court together in what was, not long before, her father’s greeting chamber. All expected her to make known her official declaration announcing her acceptance of the title of Queen of Cardolan. Calimendil and his wife Amariel were seated on either side of her as Arriana made her announcement to all. <BR><BR>Yet it was not what any might have expected. <BR><BR>To the shock and wonder of many in the hall Arriana officially made known her intent to relinquish her right to the throne and pass the privilege on to her brother, Calimendil, who would now become the fifth King of Cardolan. It was said that few were more surprised than Calimendil himself at this declaration and when he insisted that his sister explain her reasoning to the court Arriana replied, “My reasons are my own, Calimendil, and my decision is final. Yet little love doth remain in my heart for either Dol Calantir or Tharbad, both of which I would be required to rule over with an even hand. That I cannot do. Dol Calantir or Tharbad - what difference remains between them now? Both are infested by scoundrels and miscreants, though the former cloaks itself under the guise of loyalty to the crown. I desireth rather to depart and remove to Dol Argond, Vorondil’s beloved castle. There I will dwell as its new warden, so long as the new king wills it.”<BR><BR>Many in the hall rose up and let their voices be heard after Arriana’s announcement, letting it be known their agreement with her decision, for some were deeply offended by her words and explanation. Others were openly disappointed, for Arriana had many devoted friends at Dol Calantir and desired her to become Queen. But Arriana kindly hushed them adding at the last, “The fortunes of our age are changing swiftly, and not, I deem, for the better. I have not the strength of will to contest Rhudaur or even Arthedain in the years to come. Let the aged men of the council look to it. I will make ready to depart from Dol Calantir after the coronation of Calimendil.”<BR><BR>Arriana wasted little time in preparing her exit from the royal court. Ere three days were gone she had taken horse and carriage and had departed eastward for Dol Argond, a three days ride from Dol Calantir. Calimendil and Amariel were present at her departure. Though he had at first sought earnestly to persuade his sister to accept the throne ere it was too late and her decision irrevocable, Calimendil did little to dissuade her from leaving court and may have even encouraged it. <BR><BR>For many years few among the nobles of Cardolan sought to delve any deeper into Arriana’s sudden resolve in surrendering her right to the throne of Cardolan. It is unlikely that all were convinced by her explanation, and one must wonder why no one had sought to unravel the truth behind it all. Yet Calimendil’s coronation followed swiftly after Arriana’s announcement, for all were eager for the vacant throne to be filled at once. It may be that the preoccupation of crowning a new king after the long reign of Tarandil had stifled any remaining interest in Arriana and her plight. The reasons are unclear.<BR><BR>Yet at last the sad truth behind the mystery must be unveiled. Iliandor, of course, knew full well the reasoning behind Arriana’s refusal of the throne and kept the secret safe for many years after, much to his good credit. It was not until well nigh the year of Cardolan’s final collapse in 1409 that I had been able to gain access to my grandfather’s personal effects and documents that he had made during his tenure as chief advisor to King Calimendil. The writings in question date from the years shortly after the coronation of the new King. They are not in Iliandor’s own hand, but rather written by a certain Berhan, who had been chief treasurer and a member of the privy council to King Tarandil ere the latter’s death. They are carefully composed notes that were deliberately chronicled by Berhan as a fail-safe method of entrapment and coercion against princess Arriana, whom bore no love at all for Berhan or his allies among Tarandil’s court. <BR><BR>Though a competent keeper of the King’s purse and popular among the nobles, Berhan was a greedy and ambitious man. Only his appetite for women of beauty matched his hunger for wealth and power. Yet he managed to disguise his true heart to most of his fellows. He had sought to persuade Tarandil to organize a raid (headed by prince Calimendil) upon the Hillmen who dwelt within the Angle by bringing in a large number of mercenaries to do most of the work, but Arriana convinced her father against it and the idea was dropped. Furthermore, he was also said to have greatly desired Arriana for himself and at one time sought courtship with her. But she rejected him, for she glimpsed all too truly the genuine lustfulness of his character. This more than anything else provided him with the motive for his later actions.<BR><BR>There chanced a day of summer, ere Vorondil’s disappearance, when three hunters roamed the rugged hills near the Greyflood in search of game. Stalking into a grove of white cedars the three men heard the sounds of two people talking together nearby. Creeping up silently they beheld a man and a woman bathing in a small stream that fed the Greyflood. They had at first assumed that they were two ordinary commoners, but one of the hunters found the man’s clothing and garments near their hiding place. There was also a long sword in a scabbard upon the ground that bore the royal emblems of Tarandil’s house. The blade belonged to Vorondil, of that it seemed plain. The couple that bathed in the stream together was Vorondil and Arriana, or so it was said. Amorous acts between the two ensued soon thereafter. <BR><BR>As it happened, one of the three hunters was in the service of Berhan as a spy and watchman whose duty it was to maintain a vigil upon the Gwathló for fear of suspect travelers and boatmen seeking to infiltrate Cardolan. Once back at Dol Calantir the hunter (whose name is lost) eagerly reported to Berhan all that he had witnessed between the two children of the king. Embittered by his rejection from Arriana, and being filled with jealousy of Vorondil, Berhan retained the letters from his spy but said nothing of the event, for he knew not yet how to manipulate the information to his best advantage. Yet when it finally seemed clear that the king’s heir was missing and not likely to return, Berhan knew that Arriana would be in line for Tarandil’s throne following his death. A prospect he did not relish. Therefore, after Tarandil was laid to rest in the mounds of Tyrn Gorthad, Berhan secretly approached Arriana and presented her with the letters describing her inappropriate behavior with Vorondil in the woods near the river. It was signed by the three witnesses. <BR><BR>Berhan, by means of extortion, proposed that Arriana relinquish her right to the throne of Cardolan in favor of Calimendil, who was not to be informed of the deal. In return for her abdication the letters, or any hint of the rumor, would be buried forever. If she refused Berhan’s proposal, immediate word would be spread through the court of her intimate relationship with her brother. Such a scandal would be disastrous not only for herself, but also for the royal family line of Thorondor, first king of Cardolan. Arriana scarcely had any choice in the matter. She would not have wanted for her father or brother to know of the incident between her and Vorondil. It also may be that she had no stomach for ruling a realm. Regardless of the fact, she did indeed comply with Berhan’s wish and passed on her right to the throne. Tarandil died never having heard the rumor, which was fortunate for all.
User avatar
Celebrimbor32
Ranger of the North
 
Posts: 1524
Joined: Fri Aug 10, 2001 9:22 pm
Location: U.S.A.
Top

Postby rowanberry » Tue Jan 27, 2004 11:52 am

A nice installment again. <img src="http://www.tolkienonline.com/mb/i/expressions/face-icon-small-smile.gif"border=0> So, the suspicions Calimendil had about his brother and sister at one point weren't totally without good cause...
User avatar
rowanberry
+++Out Of Cheese Error+++


 
Posts: 20480
Joined: Thu Apr 11, 2002 12:26 am
Location: Back row of the chorus in a silly Bollywood movie
Top

Postby Celebrimbor32 » Tue Jan 27, 2004 9:06 pm

No indeed...Hmm, I hope that part wasn't too risqué or inappropriate for TORC! <img src="http://www.tolkienonline.com/mb/i/expressions/face-icon-small-blush.gif"border=0> Thanks for reading, rowanberry <img src="http://www.tolkienonline.com/mb/i/expressions/face-icon-small-smile.gif"border=0>
User avatar
Celebrimbor32
Ranger of the North
 
Posts: 1524
Joined: Fri Aug 10, 2001 9:22 pm
Location: U.S.A.
Top

Postby Celebrimbor32 » Sat Mar 13, 2004 9:54 pm

OF CALIMENDIL AND THE NEW EPOCH<BR><BR>The coronation of King Calimendil, Fifth King of Cardolan took place in the third week of January, 1289. It had not nearly the lustrous pomp and gallantry as did the coronations of the four previous Kings of Cardolan. This was not due to a lack of interest or feelings of ill will, but rather to the haste that was required of it, for the throne had now been vacant for nearly a month after Tarandil’s passing and there was not a soul among the court who wished to see it remain so a day longer. For his part, Calimendil took the vows of his new kingship in a stately and dignified manner and showed little emotion. But many years after he had confessed to Amariel that he was in a state of bewilderment as he knelt and accepted his new unexpected crown. Arriana was also there to witness her brother’s coronation, though she felt little joy for him. She was stung by her bitterness towards Berhan, whom she now loathed. But as she witnessed Calimendil’s acceptance of the crown and throne of Cardolan it was said that she had begun to have feelings of resentment towards her brother once again. Next day she departed for Dol Argond.<BR><BR>If events passed swiftly in Cardolan after the death of King Tarandil, and its fortune seemed to glow with hope promised, things were otherwise outside of the realm. Word of Tarandil’s death reached the ears of Celebrindor in Fornost less than a month after he expired. It was rumored that the King of Cardolan succumbed to a painful malady, which infected his lungs with a mortal disease. The relationship between Tarandil and Celebrindor had always been tenuous at best. Yet the King of Arthedain had secretly looked with hope for the day when Tarandil would pass away and leave his realm in the hands of the weak and verdant Arriana. She would not be strong enough to maintain a force upon Amon Sûl and the Palantir. But his hope was cheated at the tidings that she had abdicated the throne in favor of her brother Calimendil. <BR><BR>Now Tarandil’s youngest son had made himself something of a villain and a rogue in Fornost when he had dared to re-enter Arthedain, violating the ban that was imposed upon him for his alleged ‘kidnapping’ of Amariel nearly ten years before. Even in Annuminas his name was held in low repute. This was chiefly because of Girwaedh, he whom had been promised the hand of Amariel by her father ere Calimendil made his first appearance in the country. Girwaedh, by right, was a noble and a lesser lord among the royal house of Tarma(*). He had long made known to his fellows in Annuminas of Calimendil’s ill deeds and treachery to him and his father, Rathmir(**). Soon after the rumor of the marriage of Calimendil and Amariel had reached him from Cardolan he became enraged and vowed to slay Calimendil in hand-to-hand combat if he could arrange it. <BR><BR>When word of Calimendil’s coronation as King of Cardolan reached him Girwaedh immediately sent messages to Calimendil at Dol Calantir that Herold, Calimendil’s old friend and servant whom he had secretly sent to Fornost to rouse Amariel and warn her of Calimendil’s arrival, had been apprehended as a spy some years ago. Since that time there had been no word from Herold, nor any true tidings concerning him. Yet the message of Girwaedh now made it plain that Herold had openly and willingly renounced his old friendship and allegiance with Calimendil and had acclimated himself with his new life in Arthedain. He had even struck a deal with the lords of Annuminas and was granted honorary citizenship of that city and was anointed to the post of councilor to the King at twice the sum he was given as the servant to prince Calimendil ere his disappearance.<BR><BR>Now Herold did not possess the royal bloodline to any of the houses of Cardolan, nor did he hold any royal posts during his tenure serving his old prince at Metraith. Yet Herold had been a personal friend and acquaintance of Calimendil for many years, the latter having confided in his friend in matters of both a personal and professional nature. Herold was ten years his senior but, he having lost Vorondil, it is likely that Calimendil looked upon his older friend as something of a brother. Herold knew Calimendil well and knew of his likes and dislikes, his moods and temperaments. He also knew his old lord’s weaknesses. He was also an insider in the ways of Tharbad, his former home. Now that he was serving the lords of Calimendil’s rivals to the north he could cause trouble worthy of note and concern to Cardolan’s new king. There is no doubt that Herold divulged to Girwaedh the entire tale in full of Calimendil’s secret rendezvous with the lady Amariel outside the walls of Fornost Erain in the night, and his apparent ‘kidnapping’ of her, or so it was known to the folk in Arthedain. Girwaedh had even remarked upon those deeds in the message to Calimendil, adding further that, as a result of these crass deeds the country of Cardolan would no longer be recognized as an ally of Arthedain, and, “…unless the new king of Cardolan return’th the said lady Amariel to her rightful home among her kin and father in Annuminas, Cardolan shall one day bitterly rue it, for the marriage of Calimendil and Amariel is not recognized as binding here in Arthedain.” The letter was signed by Girwaedh and the lords among the house of Tarma. <BR><BR>It is unlikely that King Calimendil felt any real sense of threat or provocation by the letter, as Girwaedh was not as a king to make such official decrees to another foreign king. Indeed, Girwaedh lied in as much as he referred to Amariel’s father, Rathmir, for Calimendil inherited his father’s network of spies and had already known that Rathmir had died the year before. He immediately had a letter drawn up in reply to Girwaedh’s threats and sent it out by courier the following day:<BR><BR>“…How many generations of men have passed since Arthedain, mightiest of the three sister realms, ever offer’d Cardolan even the slightest of friendly tributes? Nay, rather we receive only insults and mockery from you in the north. Our alliance exists only on paper nowadays. Our hearts have become estranged. Not since the early days of Valandil and Thorondor have our peoples bore one another any true friendship. Yet I will not waste words with you here on this matter, since I am a king and you are not…As for Amariel, my wife and queen, she departed your country by her own free will, for she is a noble woman with a courageous heart and would not bear to become a slave and handmaiden to an arrogant Tarma prince, nor the victim of her DECEASED father’s devious ploys. Our love for each other is resolute. Our marriage needs not your recognition…Yet if you insist on pursuing your chosen course I will not prevent you from coming here to Dol Calantir in order to win the honor of defeating me in combat, Girwaedh of Annuminas…Furthermore, since ye have proven yourself to be a perpetrator of false information I cannot accept your testimony of my old friend and colleague, Herold of Metraith. The King of Cardolan hath spoken his final word on this matter with you.”<BR><BR>Girwaedh did indeed desire to go to Dol Calantir to meet with Calimendil in combat, but Celebrindor received word of his intentions ere he was able to depart and commanded him to acquiesce and let the rivalry between him and Calimendil rest once and for all. Why the king of Arthedain was reluctant to let one of his princes duel with the young new king of Cardolan is unclear, yet it may be that he feared that Girwaedh would get the better of Calimendil if blades were drawn between the two. Calimendil was skilled with a rapier and sword, but Girwaedh was among the top swordsmen in all of Arthedain. For a prince of Arthedain to slay, maim or even wound the king of Cardolan in his own court would set off a furor of bloodshed between the two realms at a time when the spilling of blood among the Dunedain could not be risked. About this time orcs from the relatively unfamiliar lands in the cold north had been seen in increasing numbers, and they stepped up their raids upon the frontiersmen of Arthedain. Rumors of gruesome atrocities reached the ears of Celebrindor at Fornost. He may have felt in his heart that the day might come when they would need the aid of their ‘friends’ to the south to help stave off the threat of the orcs. His predictions would prove to be all too accurate in the years ahead. <BR><BR>Yet Girwaedh was persistent. He hated Calimendil for his intrusion upon his ambitious plans and for the stealing away of Amariel’s heart. If he himself was forbidden from accepting the challenge from the king of Cardolan and from entering that country, he certainly could not be prohibited from hiring his own handpicked messengers to deliver letters to Calimendil from him. From Herold Girwaedh learned that Calimendil had always been a great lover of music. A thought entered his calculating mind that he would send as a gift to Calimendil a set of fine handcrafted flutes. Such a gesture would show to the king of Cardolan that Girwaedh wished to let the matter of Amariel and their old rivalry rest once and for all. Yet it would prove to be anything of the kind.<BR>
User avatar
Celebrimbor32
Ranger of the North
 
Posts: 1524
Joined: Fri Aug 10, 2001 9:22 pm
Location: U.S.A.
Top

Postby rowanberry » Tue Mar 16, 2004 5:56 am

I already wondered when you would have time to continue the story... Perhaps you should hint about it in the "Beleriand" OOC thread?<BR><BR>Nice job with the personal and political plottings. <img src="http://www.tolkienonline.com/mb/i/expressions/face-icon-small-smile.gif"border=0>
User avatar
rowanberry
+++Out Of Cheese Error+++


 
Posts: 20480
Joined: Thu Apr 11, 2002 12:26 am
Location: Back row of the chorus in a silly Bollywood movie
Top

Postby Celebrimbor32 » Tue May 11, 2004 4:50 pm

:!: Just thought I would drop by here and let my 2-3 loyal readers know that I have decided to re-write much of my Cardolan tale now...The basic plot will be pretty much the same, but the entire tale will be told in a different manner than what I have been doing so far. I just think it will be more interesting that way. I have also been doing some editing, which I feel is necessary in some sections....I will probably retitle my tale in a completely new thread sometime here in the near future. Thanks for your interest so far!
User avatar
Celebrimbor32
Ranger of the North
 
Posts: 1524
Joined: Fri Aug 10, 2001 9:22 pm
Location: U.S.A.
Top

Postby Arassuil » Mon Nov 16, 2009 5:53 pm

I took refuge from a cold, windy rainstorm in some ruins and came across these parchments hidden in a wine cellar.... when I finished reading them, I noticed it being somewhat brighter up above, so I brought them to the light of day...

I really like the work and details you put into your writing Celebrimbor!

(I read this a couple years ago, but I couldn't find it when I went looking for it recently, so I posted to it to put it up top.)
User avatar
Arassuil
Shield Bearer

 
Posts: 449
Joined: Wed Apr 11, 2007 5:10 pm
Location: Somewhere in Eriador
Top

Postby Celebrimbor32 » Wed Nov 18, 2009 12:23 pm

So you're the one who uncorked those old dusty parchments from that wine bottle I stashed down there! Next time I shall use a cork made of cement. :D
User avatar
Celebrimbor32
Ranger of the North
 
Posts: 1524
Joined: Fri Aug 10, 2001 9:22 pm
Location: U.S.A.
Top

Previous

Return to Writing: The Scriptorium of Imladris

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests