The Etymology Game! (please read first post)

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Postby ShelG » Fri Dec 31, 2004 1:10 am

:wink: I'm back (not that yall missed me or anything...he he)

Cannonade ~ can·non·ade

v. can·non·ad·ed, can·non·ad·ing, can·non·ades
v. tr.
To assault with heavy artillery fire.

v. intr.
To deliver heavy artillery fire.

n.
An extended, usually heavy discharge of artillery.
A harsh verbal or physical attack.


[From French canonade, discharge of artillery, from Italian cannonata, from cannone, cannon, from Old Italian. See cannon.]
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Postby Wasara » Sun Jan 02, 2005 3:57 am

Great to see you,SheG!


drumfire


1. (n) intense and continuous artillery fire
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Postby ShelG » Mon Jan 03, 2005 12:17 pm

Great 2 C U 2. Great 2 B Bak!

Fulminate ~ ful·mi·nate

v. ful·mi·nat·ed, ful·mi·nat·ing, ful·mi·nates
v. intr.

To issue a thunderous verbal attack or denunciation: fulminated against political chicanery.
To explode or detonate.

v. tr.
To issue (a denunciation, for example) thunderously.
To cause to explode.

n.
An explosive salt of fulminic acid, especially fulminate of mercury.


[Middle English fulminaten, from Latin fulminre, fulmint-, to strike with lightning, from fulmen, fulmin-, lightning that strikes. See bhel-1 in Indo-European Roots.]
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Postby Wasara » Tue Jan 04, 2005 6:01 am

detonate


1. (v) explode; "the bomb detonated at noon"

2. (v) cause the explode; "We detonated the nuclear bomb"
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Postby Orangeblossom_Bumbleroot » Wed Jan 05, 2005 11:26 am

Main Entry: kablooey
Part of Speech: adjective
Definition: destroyed, ruined; blown apart; also written kablooie
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Postby ShelG » Wed Jan 05, 2005 11:43 am

Obliterate ~ o·blit·er·ate

tr.v. o·blit·er·at·ed, o·blit·er·at·ing, o·blit·er·ates

To do away with completely so as to leave no trace.
To wipe out, rub off, or erase.
Medicine. To remove completely (a body organ or part), as by surgery, disease, or radiation.

o·bliter·ation n.
o·bliter·ative (--rtv, -r--tv) adj.
o·bliter·ator n.

obliterated

adj : reduced to nothingness [syn: blotted out, obliterate]


[Latin oblitterre, oblittert-, to erase, from ob litters (scrbere), (to write) over letters (ob, over; see ob- + litters, accusative pl. of littera, letter), and from obltus, past participle of oblvsc, to forget; see oblivion.]
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Postby Evenstar_Elfstone » Wed Jan 05, 2005 2:11 pm

Main Entry: as·sas·si·nate
Pronunciation: &-'sa-s&n-"At
Function: transitive verb
Inflected Form(s): -nat·ed; -nat·ing
Date: 1607
1: to injure or destroy unexpectedly and treacherously
2: to murder by sudden or secret attack usually for impersonal reasons
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Postby Wasara » Thu Jan 06, 2005 4:32 am

asperse


1. (v) charge falsely or with malicious intent; attack the good name and reputation of someone; "The journalists have aspersed me!"; "The article in the paper aspersed my reputation"
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Postby ShelG » Mon Jan 10, 2005 7:18 pm

backbite ~ back·bite

v. back·bit, (-bt) back·bit·ten, (-btn) back·bit·ing, back·bites

To speak spitefully or slanderously about (another).

To speak spitefully or slanderously about a person.

v : say mean things

In Ps. 15:3, the rendering of a word which means to run about tattling,
calumniating; in Prov. 25:23, secret talebearing or slandering; in Rom. 1:30
and 2 Cor. 12:20, evil-speaking, maliciously defaming the absent.
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Postby Wasara » Tue Jan 11, 2005 6:41 am

kvetch


1. (v) express complaints,discontent,displeasure or unhappiness; "My mother kvetches all day"; "She has lot to kvetch about"
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Postby ShelG » Tue Jan 11, 2005 12:48 pm

Noodge ~ noodge

n. & v. Slang
Variant of nudge2.

One who persistently pesters, annoys, or complains.

v. nudged, or nudzhed or noodged nudg·ing, or nudzh·ing or noodg·ing nudg·es or nudzh·es or noodg·es

v. tr.
To annoy persistently; pester.

v. intr.
To complain or carp persistently.


[From Yiddish nudyen, to pester, bore, from Polish nudzi.]
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Postby Wasara » Wed Jan 12, 2005 5:52 am

beleaguer


1. (v) surround so as to force to give up; "The Turks beleaguered Vienna"

2. (v) annoy persistently; "The children beleaguered the boy because of his stammer"
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Postby Evenstar_Elfstone » Wed Jan 12, 2005 12:12 pm

belabour

1a: to attack verbally b: to beat soundly
2: to explain or insist on excessively <belabour the obvious>
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Postby Wasara » Thu Jan 13, 2005 8:38 am

pick apart


1. (v) find fault with; express criticism of; point out real or perceived flaws; "The paper pick apart the new movie"
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Postby ShelG » Thu Feb 03, 2005 2:26 pm

Animadvert ~ an·i·mad·vert

intr.v. an·i·mad·vert·ed, an·i·mad·vert·ing, an·i·mad·verts

To remark or comment critically, usually with strong disapproval or censure: “a man... who animadverts on miserly patients, egocentric doctors, psychoanalysis and Lucky Luciano with evenhanded fervor”

v 1: speak one's opinion without fear or hesitation; "John spoke up at the meeting" [syn: opine, speak up, sound off]
2: express blame or censure or make a harshly critical remark



[Middle English animadverten, to notice, from Latin animadvertere : animus, mind; see an- in Indo-European Roots + advertere, to turn toward; see adverse.]
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Postby Idhren » Tue Feb 08, 2005 1:37 pm

Censure

Main Entry: censure
Function: transitive verb
Inflected Form(s): cen·sured; cen·sur·ing /'sen(t)-sh(&-)ri[ng]/
1 obsolete : ESTIMATE, JUDGE
2 : to find fault with and criticize as blameworthy
synonym see CRITICIZE
- cen·sur·er /'sen(t)-sh&r-&r/ noun
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Postby Wasara » Fri Feb 11, 2005 4:44 am

reprimand


1. (n) an act or expression of criticism and censure; "he had to take the reprimand with a smile on his face"

2. (v) rebuke formally

3. (v) censure severely or angrily; "The mother reprimanded the child for entering a stranger's car"; "The deputy reprimanded the Prime Minister"; "The customer reprimanded the waiter for bringing cold soup"
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Postby ShelG » Sun Feb 20, 2005 7:34 am

Wig ~ wig

1. n. An artificial covering of human or synthetic hair worn on the head for personal adornment, as part of a costume, or to conceal baldness.

2. v. To scold or censure.

3. v. To make or become wildly excited, enthusiastic, or crazy.



wig out Slang

wigging

n : British slang for a scolding [syn: wig]
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Postby Wasara » Tue Feb 22, 2005 7:48 am

grizzle


1. (n) a grey wig

2. (v) complain whiningly

3. (v) be in a huff; be silent or sullen
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Postby Wasara » Thu Dec 01, 2005 12:00 pm

Shall we refresh this!
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Postby Dad-human » Fri Jan 06, 2006 10:08 pm

grizzly bear
n.
The brown bear of northwest North America, now considered a subspecies (Ursus arctos subsp. horribilis). Also called silvertip.
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Postby Wasara » Tue Jan 10, 2006 6:40 am

bear

Definition:

1. [n] massive plantigrade carnivorous or omnivorous mammals with long shaggy coats and strong claws
2. [n] an investor with a pessimistic market outlook
3. [v] have on one's person; "He wore a red ribbon"; "bear a scar"
4. [v] give birth (to a newborn); "My wife had twins yesterday!"
5. [v] be pregnant with; "She is bearing his child"; "The are expecting another child in January"; "I am carrying his child"
6. [v] put up with something or somebody unpleasant; "I cannot bear his constant criticism"; "The new secretary had to endure a lot of unprofessional remarks"; "he learned to tolerate the heat"
7. [v] move while holding up or supporting; "Bear gifts"; "bear a heavy load"; "bear news"; "bearing orders"
8. [v] support or hold in a certain manner; "She holds her head high"; "He carried himself upright"
9. [v] bring forth, "The apple tree bore delicious apples this year"; "The unidentified plant bore gorgeous flowers"
10. [v] bring in; as of investments; "interest-bearing accounts"; "How much does this savings certificate pay annually?"
11. [v] take on as one's own the expenses or debts of another person; "I'll accept the charges"; "She agreed to bear the responsibility"
12. [v] have rightfully; of rights, titles, and offices; "She bears the title of Duchess"; "He held the governorship for almost a decade"
13. [v] behave in a certain manner; "She carried herself well"; "he bore himself with dignity"; "They conducted themselves well during these difficult times"
14. [v] have; "bear a resemblance"; "bear a signature"
15. [v] contain or hold; have within; "The jar carries wine"; "The canteen holds fresh water"; "This can
cont
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Re: The Etymology Game! (please read first post)

Postby melanippos » Sat Jan 30, 2016 4:26 am

[nods to the eager hobbit-pony who begins to run in its special hamster wheel, when the charge builds up from the static M the picks up the electric paddles and tries to restart the game...]

Bare
adjective UK /beər/ US /ber/
bare adjective (unclothed)
to be without any ​clothes or to be un​covered by anything
to bare ones teeth to lay bone bare.
Last edited by melanippos on Fri Feb 05, 2016 3:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: The Etymology Game! (please read first post)

Postby Chariot Rider » Thu Feb 04, 2016 8:36 am

car·ry
ˈkerē/
verb
verb: carry; 3rd person present: carries; past tense: carried; past participle: carried; gerund or present participle: carrying
1.
support and move (someone or something) from one place to another.
"medics were carrying a wounded man on a stretcher"
synonyms: convey, transfer, move, take, bring, bear, lug, tote, fetch, cart
"she carried the box into the kitchen"
transport, conduct, or transmit.
"the train service carries 20,000 passengers daily"
synonyms: transport, convey, move, handle More
"a cruise line carrying a million passengers a year"
transmit, conduct, relay, communicate, convey, dispatch, beam
"satellites carry the signal across the country"
have on one's person and take with one wherever one goes.
"the money he was carrying was not enough to pay the fine"
be infected with (a disease) and liable to transmit it to others.
"ticks can carry Lyme disease"
2.
support the weight of.
"the bridge is capable of carrying even the heaviest loads"
synonyms: support, sustain, stand; More
prop up, shore up, bolster
"the dinghy can carry the weight of the baggage"
be pregnant with.
"she was carrying twins"
synonyms: be pregnant with, bear, expect; technicalbe gravid with
"she was carrying twins"
stand and move in a specified way.
"she carried herself straight and with assurance"
synonyms: conduct, bear, hold; More
act, behave, acquit;
formalcomport
"she carried herself with assurance"
assume or accept (responsibility or blame).
"they must carry the responsibility for the mess they have gotten the company into"
synonyms: bear, accept, assume, undertake, shoulder, take on (oneself)
"managers carry most of the responsibility"
be responsible for the effectiveness or success of.
"they relied on dialogue to carry the plot"
3.
have as a feature or consequence.
"being a combat sport, karate carries with it the risk of injury"
synonyms: entail, involve, result in, occasion, have as a consequence
"it carries a penalty of two years' imprisonment"
4.
(of a sound, ball, missile, etc.) reach a certain point.
"his voice carried clearly across the room"
synonyms: be audible, travel, reach
"his voice carried across the field"
(of a gun or similar weapon) propel (a missile) to a specified distance.
GOLF
hit the ball over and beyond (a particular point).
take or develop (an idea or activity) to a specified point.
"he carried the criticism much further"
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Re: The Etymology Game! (please read first post)

Postby melanippos » Fri Feb 05, 2016 3:33 pm

convey |kənˈvā|
verb [ with obj. ]
transport or carry to a place: pipes were laid to convey water to the house.
• make (an idea, impression, or feeling) known or understandable to someone: the real virtues and diversity of America had never been conveyed in the movies | it's impossible to convey how lost I felt.
• communicate (a message or information): Mr. Harvey and his daughter have asked me to convey their very kind regards.
• Law transfer the title to (property).
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Re: The Etymology Game! (please read first post)

Postby prmiller » Sat Aug 27, 2016 8:41 pm

folly |ˈfälē|
noun (pl. follies)
1 lack of good sense; foolishness: an act of sheer folly.
• a foolish act, idea, or practice: the follies of youth.
2 a costly ornamental building with no practical purpose,
especially a tower or mock-Gothic ruin built in a large garden or park.
[Similar to the one in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, the Nolan Hill Ruin]

3 (Follies) a theatrical revue, typically with glamorous female performers:
[ in names ] : the Ziegfeld Follies.

ORIGIN
Middle English: from Old French folie ‘madness,’ in modern French also ‘delight, favorite dwelling’ (compare with sense 2),
from fol ‘fool, foolish.’
The joys of summer

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