The Etymology Game! (please read first post)

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Postby ShelG » Thu Nov 04, 2004 2:21 pm

Warble ~ war-ble

v.
war·bled, war·bling, war·bles
v. tr.
To sing (a note or song, for example) with trills, runs, or other melodic embellishments.

v. intr.
To sing with trills, runs, or quavers.
To be sounded in a trilling or quavering manner.

n.
The act or an instance of singing with trills, runs, or quavers.


[Middle English werbelen, from Old North French werbler, of Germanic rigin.]


war·ble n.

An abscessed boillike swelling on the back of cattle, deer, and certain other animals, caused by the larva of a warble fly.
The warble fly, especially in its larval stage.
A hard lump of tissue on a riding horse's back caused by rubbing of the saddle.


[Probably of Scandinavian origin; akin to obsolete Swedish varbulde.]
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Postby Wasara » Fri Nov 05, 2004 6:06 am

yodel


1. (n) a songlike cry in which the voice fluctuates rapidly between the normal voice and falsetto

2. (v) sing by changing register; sing by yodeling; "The Austrians were yodeling in the mountains"
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Postby Idhren » Fri Nov 05, 2004 12:18 pm

Falsetto

1. A forced voice of a range or register above the natural; the head voice.

1774 WALPOLE Let. Earl Strafford 11 Nov., There is a full melancholy melody in his [Leoni's] voice, though a falsetta. 1799 YOUNG in Phil. Trans. XC. 142 The same difference..takes place between the natural voice and the common falsetto. 1843 Penny Cycl. XXVI. 419/1 The term basso falsetto has been proposed to designate this voice [a feigned lower voice], but the term lower falsetto is more accurate. 1855 SMEDLEY H. Coverdale lvii. 390 ‘To whom do I refer?’ repeated her husband in the highest note of his shrill falsetto. 1879 GROVE Dict. Mus. 501/2 The male counter-tenor, or alto voice, is almost entirely falsetto.



fig. 1796 BURKE Regic. Peace i. Wks. 1808 VIII. 103 The mock heroick falsetto of stupid tragedy. 1814 SCOTT Drama (1874) 186 All is tuned to the same smooth falsetto of sentiment. 1875 SWINBURNE Ess. & Studies 249 Much of the poem is written throughout in falsetto.



2. One who sings with a falsetto voice.

1789 BURNEY Hist. Mus. IV. 44 You are pleased..to compare the falsetti of former times with the soprani. 1884 F. NIECKS Dict. Mus. Terms, Falsetto, a singer who sings soprano or alto parts with such a voice.



3. attrib.

1826 MISS MITFORD Village Ser. II. (1863) 276 A sort of falsetto tone in her speech. 1854 BUSHNAN in Circ. Sc. (c1865) I. 286/2 The falsetto voice has more of a humming character. 1876 FOSTER Phys. III. vii. (1879) 605 The vocal cords are seen to be wide apart when falsetto notes are uttered. 1889 Spectator 9 Nov. 623/2 The last sentence..seems to us to go perilously near making a falsetto conscience out of the antipathies of strait-laced men.



Hence falsettist, one who sings in falsetto.

1889 Harper's Mag. LXXVII. 73 Soprano falsettists were once common enough in France. 1892 Daily News 28 July 6/2 The Italian tenor..is an ‘incomparable falsettist’.
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Postby Wasara » Fri Nov 05, 2004 12:42 pm

high-pitched


1. (adj) used of sounds and voices; high in pitch or frequency

2. (adj) set at a sharp or high angle or slant; "a high-pitched roof"
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Postby Idhren » Sat Nov 06, 2004 11:03 am

Steep

A. adj.

1. a. Extending to a great height; elevated, lofty.

Beowulf 222 (Gr.) Beoras steape. a1000 Riddles iv. 10 (Gr.) Weallas beofia steape ofer stiwitum. c1205 LAY. 19815 [They] mid eore & mid stanen stepne hul makede. 13.. E.E. Allit. P. B. 1396, & Baltazar vpon bench was busked to sete, Stepe stayred stones of his stoute throne. a1400-50 Wars Alex. 4828 A cliffe at to e cloudis semed, at was so staire & so stepe. c1440 Promp. Parv. 474/1 Steepe, nowt lowe, elevatus, ascendens. 1615 CHAPMAN Odyss. I. 200 To a roome they came, Steepe, and of state. 1667 MILTON P.L. IV. 135 Where delicious Paradise,..Crowns with her enclosure green,..the champain head Of a steep wilderness. 1738 WESLEY Hymn, ‘Eternal Wisdom’ ix, Thy Breath can raise the Billows steep, Or sink them to the Sand.



b. = ‘High’ in certain transferred uses. Of warriors or their attributes: Of high courage, noble. Of a voice: High, loud. Obs.

c1205 LAY. 1532 er wes moni steap mon mid stele to~swngen. Ibid. 1541 Cu nu ine strenga & ina stepa main. Ibid. 5879 And make we..auer alche hæpe hertoe stæpne. 13.. Coer de L. 5985 Kyng Richard..cryyd on hym with voys ful stepe, ‘Home, schrewe!’



2. a. Of eyes: Projecting, prominent (also steep-out); staring; glaring with passion.

c1000 ÆLFRIC Hom. I. 456 He hæf steape eaan [= L. ‘oculi grandes’, Pass. S. Bartholomæi]. a1225 Leg. Kath. 307 e keiser bistarede hire wi swie steape ehnen hwil at ha spek us. c1320 Sir Beues 685 Wi stepe eien & rowe bren So loeliche he gan on hem sen,..ai were aferde. c1386 CHAUCER Prol. 201 His heed was balled..Hise eyen stepe, and rollynge in his heed. 1397 TREVISA Barth. De P.R. III. xvii. (1495) 64 Grete and stepe eyen [L. oculus eminens]..se not well aferre: but depe eyen se wel aferre. c1400 Destr. Troy 3758 Crispe herit was the kyng,..Stokyn ene out stepe with a streught loke. Ibid. 7724 His Ene [were] leuenaund with light as a low fyn, With stremys full stithe in his stepe loke. c1400 tr. Secreta Secret., Gov. Lordsh. 115 He at hauys steepe-owt eghen [L. oculos extensos] ys malicious & feloun. a1450 LOVELICH Grail xiii. 651 With grete stepe Eyen In his hed Also. 1555 W. WATREMAN Fardle Facions II. x. 212 The Tartares are very deformed,..hauying great stiepe eyes.



b. Of jewels, eyes, stars: Brilliant. In later use only of eyes, in the poetical phrase steep and gray. Obs.

a1000 Gnomic Verses i. 23 (Gr.) im sceal on hringe standan steap & eap. a1000 Sal. & Sat. 284 (Gr.) Ne mæ hit steorra ne stan ne se steapa imm..wihte beswican. a1225 Leg. Kath. 1647 A deorewure wal, schininde, & schenre, of imstanes steapre en is eni steorre. a1225 St. Marher. 9 His twa ehnen steappre ene steorren ant ene imstanes ant brad as bascins. c1330 King of Tars 15 Eyyen stepe and graye. 13.. E.E. Allit. P. B. 583 By-enk e sumtyme, Wheer he at stykked vche a stare in vche steppe ye, if hym self be bore blynde hit is a brod wonder. a1529 SKELTON P. Sparowe 1014 Her eyen gray and stepe Causeth myne hert to lepe. 1577 GRANGE Golden Aphrod. Gjb, Hir twinckling eyne bothe steepe and grey, they seeme like Christall cleare.



3. a. Of a hill, mountain, cliff: Having an almost perpendicular face or slope, precipitous. Of a gradient or slope, a staircase, etc.: High-pitched.
The sense prob. goes back to OE., but is difficult to authenticate, as when applied to mountains, cliffs, etc. the word prob. expressed a mixed notion of senses 1 and 3.

c1200 ORMIN 11379 & et to deofell..brohhte himm onn an lawe att wass well swie stæp & heh. 13.. K. Alis. 7041 Theo path on mount was narwe and stepe, In valeys, dark and deope. 1533 ELYOT Cast. Helthe (1539) 50b, Stronge or violente exercises be these..clymmyng or walkyng against a stipe vpright hyll. 1549 THOMAS Hist. Italie 161, I thynke the stipe descent of the hill causeth, that they haue not roome enough to make theyr stretes large. 1588 SHAKES. L.L.L. IV. I. 2 Was that the King that spurd his horse so hard, Against the steepe vprising of the hill? 1605 VERSTEGAN Dec. Intell. iv. 98 These clifs..are..as it were cut of stiep or straight down, from the top to the bottom. 1610 HOLLAND Camden's Brit. 344 A mighty ridge of steepe high Cliffs [L. cautium eminentia]..runneth for seaven miles or there about, as far as to Dover. 1611 BIBLE Matt. viii. 32 The whole herd of swine ranne violently downe a steepe place into the Sea. 1667 MILTON P.L. II. 71 The way seems difficult and steep to scale With upright wing against a higher foe. a1700 EVELYN Diary 28 Aug. 1670, Those huge steepe stayres ascending to it. 1718 LADY M. W. MONTAGU Let. to Mrs. T 25 Sept., The descent is..steep and slippery. 1796 H. HUNTER tr. St.-Pierre's Stud. Nat. (1799) I. 137 The declivity of the bason of the Sea is much steeper than that of the bounding lands. 1813 SHELLEY Q. Mab ix. 218 Again the burning wheels inflame The steep descent of Heaven's untrodden way. 1838 ARNOLD Hist. Rome I. 32 The hills of Rome are..low in height but with steep and rocky sides. 1876 M. E. BRADDON J. Haggard's Dau. II. 17 The narrow path..had been cut into steps where the slope was steepest. 1884 [see GRADIENT n. 1].



b. transf. of movement. poet.

1603 DRAYTON Barons' Wars VI. xxii, That slippery way Where the most worldly prouident doe slide, Feeling the steepe fall threatning sure decay. 1667 MILTON P.L. III. 741 [He] Throws his steep flight in many an Aerie wheele. 1818 SHELLEY Homer's Hymn to Sun 22 His rapid steeds soon bear him to the West; Where their steep flight his hands divine arrest.



c. Of a ditch, cave or the like: Having precipitous sides or entrance. Obs.

1568 GRAFTON Chron. II. 974 With diuers fortresses in the ditches, which were so broade and so plumme steepe that was wonder to beholde. 1598 Extracts Burgh Rec. Glasgow (1876) 189 His steip trocht and wolt biggit be him. 1601 Ibid., Ane steip troche. 1608 TOPSELL Serpents 10 Ouid writeth: Longo caput extulit antro Cæruleus serpens,..That isThe greenish Serpent extolld her head from denne so steepe.



d. Of a forehead: Upright, high. Obs. rare1.

1509 HAWES Past. Pleas. xxx. (Percy Soc.) 146 Her forehead stepe, with fayre browes ybent.



e. Of water: Having a headlong course, flowing precipitously. Of rain (Sc.): Pouring. Obs.

c1330 Arth. & Merl. 1450 Her vnder is a erde depe A water, boe swift & stepe. 1634 MILTON Comus 97 And the gilded Car of Day, His glowing Axle doth allay In the steep Atlantick stream. c1655 Ps. lxxxi. 31, I tri'd thee at the water steep of Meriba renown'd. 1659 A. HAY Diary (S.H.S.) 149 Mr Rot Broun and I cam away from Lanerick in a very steep raine.



f. Coal-mining. Of a seam or measure: Having a high inclination.

1883 GRESLEY Gloss. Coal-mining 239 Steep seams [of coal]. 1892 Labour Commission Gloss., Steep Measures, a description of the seams of coal on the South crop..in South Wales, which are highly inclined.



g. steepest descent(s) (Math.), used with reference to a method of finding a minimum of a function of two or more variables by repeatedly evaluating it at a point displaced from the previous point in the direction that locally involved the greatest drop in its value.

1939 Proc. R. Soc. A. CLXIX. 484 In the method of steepest descents the displacement affects all co-ordinates and affects them in the ratio of their residual forces. 1943 Bull. Amer. Math. Soc. XLIX. 18 We now choose the line along which the motion proceeds so that the descent is as steep as possible (lines of steepest descent). 1974 ADBY & DEMPSTER Introd. Optimization Methods iii. 57 The steepest descent method uses the Jacobian gradient g to determine a suitable direction of movement.



4. In occasional figurative uses. (Very common in Milton). a. Of an aim, an undertaking, etc.: Arduous, full of difficulty, ambitious.

1598 T. bunnyslipper Chrestol. IV. xii. 85 His heedlesse good and steepe presumptuousnesse. 1816 BYRON Ch. Har. III. cv. They were gigantic minds, and their steep aim Was, Titan~like, on daring doubts to pile Thoughts which [etc.].



b. Of a difficulty: Hard to surmount. Obs.

1644 MILTON Areop. (Arb.) 32 To which [bound of civill liberty]..wee are already in good part arriv'd, and yet from such a steepe disadvantage of tyranny and superstition grounded into our principles as was [etc.].



c. = HEADLONG a. 4. Obs.

1616 B. JONSON Forest xi, Who..Would, at suggestion of a steepe desire, Cast himselfe from the spire Of all his happiness? 1649 MILTON Eikon. 42 The stay and support of all things from that steep ruin to which he had nigh brought them. 1653 Ps. vii. 60 With ruine steep. 1667 P.L. VI. 324 It met The sword of Satan with steep force to smite Descending.



d. Of inequalities, contrasts: Violent, extreme.

1856 EMERSON Eng. Traits, Result Wks. (Bohn) II. 136 The feudal system survives in the steep inequality of property and privilege. Ibid., Manners ibid. II. 51 The range of nations from which London draws, and the steep contrasts of condition, create the picturesque in society.



5. slang. Excessive, extravagant, ‘stiff’, ‘tall’. Of a price, an amount: Exorbitant. Of a story, etc.: Exaggerated, incredible.

1856 Knick. Mag. Apr. XLVII. 362 (Thornton Amer. Gloss.) He's too steep in his price, anyway. 1857 Chicago Tribune 17 Oct. (Bartlett), One hundred and ten Winnebago Indians, wearing their blankets, voted the Democratic ticket; but the agent thought this was rather steep, so he afterwards crossed that number from the list. 1895 Westm. Gaz. 22 Apr. 4/3 This is rather a steep statement, even for a party that exists on credit. 1901 Munsey's Mag. XXIV. 441/1 Forty thousand marks..is a pretty steep price even for a royal motor carriage.



6. attrib. and Comb., as steep-grade adj.; chiefly parasynthetic, as steep-backed, -faced, -fronted, -gabled, -pitched, -pointed, -roofed, -scarped, -sided, -streeted; steepward adv. ?on a steep slope. Also STEEP-DOWN, STEEP-TO, STEEP-UP, STEEPWISE.

1889 F. COWPER Captain of Wight 227 The old man once more turned to climb the *steep-backed hill.


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1894 J. C. ATKINSON Old Whitby 60 The *steep-faced cliff.
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1936 Nature 21 Mar. 491/2 The test piece is flashed over with a *steep-fronted impulse in about a microsecond or less.
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1915 Blackw. Mag. Jan. 124/2 A *steep-gabled house.
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1896 Daily News 25 Feb. 5/4 The..*steep-grade tramway.
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1885 WARREN & CLEVERLY Wand. Beetle 140 We swung under the bridge, and ran in to the *steep-pitched landing.
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1912 ‘GUY THORNE’ Great Acceptance x. (1915) 255 Turrets with *steep-pointed roofs.
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1814 SCOTT Wav. viii, The house, which seemed to consist of two or three high, narrow, and *steep-roofed buildings.
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1878 RAMSAY Phys. Geog. xviii. 296 The *steep-scarped front..faces to the north-west.
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1856 KANE Arct. Expl. I. ix. 93 Large gorges..generally *steep-sided.
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1872 M. COLLINS Plunges for Pearl I. vi. 116 The *steep-streeted little town of Silveroar.
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1588 KYD Househ. Philos. Wks. (1901) 270 Whether it lie *steepeward downe the hyls, vneasie and painful to be past.
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B. n.

1. a. The declivity or slope of a mountain, hill, cliff; a steep or precipitous place.

1555 EDEN Decades (Arb.) 133 Ryuers..wherwith al suche trees as are planted on the stiepe or foote of the mountaynes, as vines..are watered. 1590 SHAKES. Mids. N. II. i. 69 Why art thou heere Come from the farthest steepe [Qo. 1 steppe] of India? 1615 G. SANDYS Trav. 27 Having climbed the mountaine steepe towards the sea. 1667 MILTON P.L. IV. 680 How often from the steep Of echoing Hill..have we heard Celestial voices. 1721 DE FOE Mem. Cavalier (1840) 76 On the steep of the rock was a bastion. 1791 W. BARTRAM Carolina 341 They then pass on rapidly to a high perpendicular steep of rocks. 1801 CAMPBELL Ye Mariners 22 Britannia needs no bulwarks, No towers along the steep. 1861 M. ARNOLD Southern Night 23 There, where Gibraltar's cannon'd steep O'erfrowns the wave. 1883 MRS. RITCHIE Bk. Sibyls i. 2 The old..highroad.. winds its way resolutely up the steep. 1899 Daily News 24 Oct. 5/4 He broke and fell back, being driven pell mell over the steeps to the rear of his position.



transf. 1860 DICKENS etc. Message fr. Sea iv. Christmas Stories (1874) 182 Having..launched the boat down the steep of the deck, into the water.



b. poet. of the sky.

1697 DRYDEN Virg. Georg. I. 602 The setting Sun survey, When down the steep of Heav'n he drives the Day. 1837 CARLYLE Fr. Rev. I. II. i, Behold the new morning glittering down the eastern steeps. 1850 S. DOBELL Roman ii. 26 Let me breathe thee round the base Of the celestial steep. 1878 JOAQUIN MILLER Songs of Italy 87, I have looked to the steeps of the starry sky.



c. fig.

1742 YOUNG Nt. Th. VII. 705 By straining up the steep of excellent What gains she? 1780 J. ADAMS in Fam. Lett. (1876) 380 Hercules marches here in full view of the steeps of virtue on one hand and the flowery paths of pleasure on the other. 1877 L. MORRIS Epic of Hades III. 32 For Knowledge is a steep which few may climb, While Duty is a path which all may tread. 1883 S. C. HALL Retrospect II. 132 His first wife helped him up the steep, cheered him on the way [etc.]. 1910 W. JAMES Mem. & Stud. 275 The notion of a sheep's paradise like that revolts, they say, our higher imagination. Where then would be the steeps of life?



2. a steep (advb. phr.), steeply sloping. Obs.

1573-80 TUSSER Husb. (1878) 98 Some maketh a hollownes, halfe a foot deepe, with fower sets in it, set slant wise a steepe.



C. adv.

1. With a steep slope, abruptly.

1548 THOMAS Ital. Dict. (1550), Rattezza, quickenesse, or the goyng stype vp hyll. 1548 Elyot's Dict., Præruptè, stype without any bendying.



2. to run steep = to run high (HIGH adv. 9).

1894 Outing (U.S.) XXIV. 475/2 Others..are never so happy as when enjoying a glorious thresh to windward, with..the sea running steep.



3. With the eyes wide open. Obs.

14.. Guy Warw. 7730 He lokyd vp steype starande.



4. Comb. with pres. and pa. pples., as steep-ascending, -bending, -cut, -descending, -hanging, -rising, -yawning.

1727-46 THOMSON Summer 608 The *steep-ascending eagle soars With upward pinions through the flood of day.


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1538 ELYOT Dict., Accliue, *stepe bendynge.
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1888 KIPLING Lett. Marque (1891) xv. 115 Up rough banks..down *steep-cut dips. 1901 Harper's Mag. CII. 741/2 They found themselves on top of a steep-cut bluff.
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1728 THOMSON Spring Seasons (1730) 41 The trembling Steed..*steep-descending stems The headlong Torrents foaming down the Hills.
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1591 SYLVESTER Du Bartas I. vii. 26 Here from a craggy Rock's *steep-hanging boss..A silver Brook in broken streams doth gush.
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Ibid. II. iii. III. Law 659 Can we (like Birds) with still-*steep-rising flight Surmount these Mountains?
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1725 ARMSTRONG Imit. Shaks. 177 Misc. Wks. 1770 I. 157 A gulph that swallows vision, with wide mouth *Steep-yawning to receive them.
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Postby Wasara » Sat Nov 06, 2004 11:55 am

usurious


1. (adj) greatly exceeding bounds of reason or moderation; "usurious rent"; "usurious prices"; "spends on usurious amount on entertainment"; "usurious interest rate"; "usurious spending"
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Postby Idhren » Sat Nov 06, 2004 4:48 pm

Extravagant

1. A going out of the usual path; an excursion, digression. Also, the position or fact of erring from (a prescribed path). lit. and fig. Obs.

1643 MILTON Divorce II. vii. (1851) 80 A doctrine of that extravagance from the sage principles of piety. 1645 HAMMOND Pract. Catech. 11, I have troubled you too farre by this extravagance: I shall make no delay to recall my selfe into the rode againe. a1656 BP. HALL Rem. Wks., Life (1660) 15 Sollicited me for my Company in a Journey..to the Spa..laying before me..the Benefit of that small Extravagance.



2. The quality of being extravagant or of exceeding just or prescribed limits, esp. those of decorum, probability, or truth; unrestrained excess; fantastic absurdity (of opinions, conduct, etc.); outrageous exaggeration or violence (of language).

1676 G. ETHEREGE Man of Mode III. ii, L. Town. Here's the freshest Fool in Town..Dor. Sooth him up in his extravagance! 1681 DRYDEN Sp. Fryar Ep. Ded. 2 Some Verses of my own, Maximin and Almanzor, cry Vengeance upon me for their Extravagance. 1716-8 LADY M. W. MONTAGUE Lett. I. xxxvii. 144 You will accuse me of extravagance in this description. 1841 ELPHINSTONE Hist. Ind. I. II. iv. 207 The extravagance of the Braminical chronology and geography. 1864 J. H. NEWMAN Apol. 392 Not to enfeeble the freedom or vigour of human thought in religious speculation, but to resist and control its extravagance.



3. An instance or kind of extravagance; an extravagant notion, statement, piece of conduct, etc.; an irrational excess, an absurdity.

1650 FULLER Pisgah V. i. 143 Many maps are full of affected extravagances. a1680 BUTLER Rem. (1759) I. 71 So Men, who one Extravagance would shun, Into the contrary Extreme have run. 1719 DE FOE Crusoe (1840) II. i. 18 An excess of joy..has a thousand extravagances in it. 1782 PRIESTLEY Corrupt. Chr. I. I. 69 Later writers..did not follow Hilary in this extravagance. 1809-10 COLERIDGE Friend (ed. 3) I. 80 The extravagances of ignorance and credulity. 1857 KEBLE Eucharist. Adorat. 1 Had there been no abuse, error or extravagance connected with the practice. 1875 JOWETT Plato (ed. 2) V. 181 Impatient of the extravagances to which the love of truth almost necessarily leads.



4. Excessive prodigality or wastefulness in expenditure, household management, etc.

1727 ARBUTHNOT Coins II. v. 133 They [the Romans] arrived by degrees to an incredible extravagance. 1805 FOSTER Ess. I. iii. 35 Extravagance of ostentatious wealth. 1817 M. EDGEWORTH Rose, Thistle, etc. II. ii, Such extravagance, to give a penny, and a silver penny, for what you may have for nothing. 1838 DICKENS Nich. Nick. iii, I can't support them in their extravagances. 1873 BLACK Pr. Thule (1874) 16 Do you think I would take the child to London to show her its extravagance. Mod. The cook's extravagance was too much for me.
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Postby Wasara » Sun Nov 07, 2004 3:04 am

spendthrift


1. (n) someone who spends money prodigally

2. (adj) recklessly wasteful; "spendthrift in their expenditures"
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Postby ShelG » Sun Nov 07, 2004 10:29 am

Wastrel ~ wast·rel

n.
One who wastes, especially one who wastes money; a profligate.
An idler or a loafer.


[wast(e) + -rel(as in scoundrel).]

n. 1. Any waste thing or substance; as:
(a) Waste land or common land. [Obs.] --Carew.
(b) A profligate. [Prov. Eng.]
(c) A neglected child; a street Arab. [Eng.]

2. Anything cast away as bad or useless, as imperfect bricks, china, etc. [Obs. or Prov. Eng.]

n : someone who dissipates resources self-indulgently [syn: waster]
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Postby Wasara » Sun Nov 07, 2004 12:19 pm

squanderer


1. (n) a recklessly extravagant consumer
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Postby ShelG » Sun Nov 07, 2004 7:54 pm

Splurge ~ splurge

v. splurged, splurg·ing, splurg·es

v. intr.
To indulge in an extravagant expense or luxury.
To be showy or ostentatious.

v. tr.
To spend extravagantly or wastefully.

n.
An extravagant display.
An expensive indulgence; a spree.

n. A blustering demonstration, or great effort; a great display. [Slang, U.S.] --Bartlett.

v. i. To make a great display in any way, especially in oratory. [Slang, U.S.]

n 1: an ostentatious display (of effort or extravagance etc.) 2: any act of immoderate indulgence; "an orgy of shopping"; "an emotional binge"; "a splurge of spending" [syn: orgy, binge] v 1: indulge oneself; "I splurged on a new TV" [syn: fling] 2: be showy or ostentatious


[Perhaps blend of splash, and surge.]
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Postby Wasara » Mon Nov 08, 2004 7:01 am

fanfare


1. (n) (music) a short lively tune played on brass instrument; "he entered to a fanfare of trumpets"; "her arrival was greeted with a rousing fanfare"

2. (n) a showy outward display
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Postby ShelG » Mon Nov 08, 2004 4:58 pm

Frippery ~ frip·per·y

n. pl. frip·per·ies

Pretentious, showy finery.
Pretentious elegance; ostentation.
Something trivial or nonessential.

2. Hence: Secondhand finery; cheap and tawdry decoration; affected elegance.

n : something of little value or significance [syn: bagatelle, fluff, frivolity]

[French friperie, from Old French freperie, old clothes, from felpe, frepe, from Medieval Latin faluppa, worthless material.]
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Postby Idhren » Mon Nov 08, 2004 8:02 pm

Frivolity


1. The quality of being frivolous; disposition to trifle, frivolous behaviour, levity.

1796 BURKE Regic. Peace i. Wks. VIII. 86 When frivolity and effeminacy had been..acknowledged as their national character by the good people of this kingdom. 1816 SCOTT Antiq. xii, Musing upon the frivolity of mortal pursuits. 1841-4 EMERSON Ess., Exper. Wks. (Bohn) I. 189 A preoccupied attention is the only answer to the importunate frivolity of other people.



2. A frivolous act or thing.

1838 DICKENS Nich. Nick. iii, Mr. Nickleby glanced at these frivolities with great contempt. 1845 MAURICE Mor. & Met. Philos. in Encycl. Metrop. II. 625/1 Pithy maxims of conduct..entering into the lowest details and frivolities.


Oxford English Dictionary
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Postby Wasara » Tue Nov 09, 2004 6:50 am

bagatelle


1 (n) a table game in which short cues are used to knock balls in the holes that are guarded by wooden pegs; penalties are incurred if the pegs are knocked over

2. (n) something of little value or significance

3. (n) a light piece of music for piano
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Postby Orangeblossom_Bumbleroot » Fri Nov 12, 2004 12:43 pm

flum·mer·y ( P ) Pronunciation Key (flm-r)
n. pl. flum·mer·ies
Meaningless or deceptive language; humbug.

Any of several soft, sweet, bland foods, such as custard.
A sweet gelatinous pudding made by straining boiled oatmeal or flour.
A soft dessert of stewed, thickened fruit, often mixed with a grain such as rice.

[Welsh llymru, soft jelly from sour oatmeal.]

flummery

Sowens \Sow"ens\ (? or ?), n. pl. [Scottish; cf. AS. se['a]w juice, glue, paste.] A nutritious article of food, much used in Scotland, made from the husk of the oat by a process not unlike that by which common starch is made; -- called flummery in England. [Written also sowans, and sowins.]

flummery

\Flum"mer*y\, n. [W. llumru, or llumruwd, a kind of food made of oatmeal steeped in water until it has turned sour, fr. llumrig harsh, raw, crude, fr. llum sharp, severe.] 1. A light kind of food, formerly made of flour or meal; a sort of pap.

Milk and flummery are very fit for children. --Locke.
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Postby Wasara » Fri Nov 12, 2004 12:49 pm

hokum


1. (n) a message that seems convey no meaning
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Postby Idhren » Fri Nov 12, 2004 4:41 pm

Hot Air
1. (n) Talk that has no purpose or that wastes time
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Postby Wasara » Sat Nov 13, 2004 3:58 am

rhetoric


1. (n) study of the technique an rules for using language effectively (especially in public speaking)

2. (n) loud and confused and empty talk; "mere rhetoric"

3.(n) high flown style; excessive use of verbal ornamentation

4. (n) using language effectively to please or persuade
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Postby Idhren » Sat Nov 13, 2004 1:46 pm

Main Entry: moot
Function: adjective
1 a : open to question : DEBATABLE b : subjected to discussion : DISPUTED
2 : deprived of practical significance : made abstract or purely academic
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Postby Wasara » Mon Nov 15, 2004 5:53 am

contestable


1. (adj) capable of being contested
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Postby Orangeblossom_Bumbleroot » Mon Nov 15, 2004 11:33 am

po·lem·ic ( P ) Pronunciation Key (p-lmk)
n.
A controversial argument, especially one refuting or attacking a specific opinion or doctrine.
A person engaged in or inclined to controversy, argument, or refutation.

adj. also po·lem·i·cal (--kl)
Of or relating to a controversy, argument, or refutation.


[French polémique, from Greek polemikos, hostile, from polemos, war.]

po·lemi·cal·ly adv
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Postby Wasara » Mon Nov 15, 2004 12:23 pm

contestation


1. (n) contentious speech act;a dispute where there is strong disagreement; "they were involved in a violent argument"
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Postby Orangeblossom_Bumbleroot » Mon Nov 15, 2004 2:12 pm

a·vow·al ( P ) Pronunciation Key (-voul)
n.
A frank admission or acknowledgment.
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Postby Wasara » Tue Nov 16, 2004 6:05 am

avouchment


1. (n) a statement asserting the existence or the truth of something
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Postby Orangeblossom_Bumbleroot » Tue Nov 16, 2004 10:18 am

as·sev·er·ate ( P ) Pronunciation Key (-sv-rt)
tr.v. as·sev·er·at·ed, as·sev·er·at·ing, as·sev·er·ates
To declare seriously or positively; affirm.

[Latin assevrre, assevrt- : ad-, ad- + sevrus, serious; see segh- in Indo-European Roots.]
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Postby Wasara » Tue Nov 16, 2004 10:35 am

allege


1. (v) report or maintain; "He alleged that he was the victim of a crime"; "He alleged it was too late to intervene to war";"The registrar alleges that I owe the school money"
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Postby Idhren » Fri Nov 19, 2004 7:13 pm

Insinuate

Pronunciation: in-'sin-y&-"wAt
Function: verb
Inflected Form(s): -at·ed; -at·ing
Etymology: Latin insinuatus, past participle of insinuare, from in- + sinuare to bend, curve, from sinus curve
transitive senses
1 a : to introduce (as an idea) gradually or in a subtle, indirect, or covert way <insinuate doubts into a trusting mind> b : to impart or communicate with artful or oblique reference
2 : to introduce (as oneself) by stealthy, smooth, or artful means
intransitive senses
1 archaic : to enter gently, slowly, or imperceptibly : CREEP
2 archaic : to ingratiate oneself
synonym see INTRODUCE, SUGGEST
- in·sin·u·a·tive /-"wA-tiv/ adjective
- in·sin·u·a·tor /-"wA-t&r/ noun
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Postby Wasara » Sat Nov 20, 2004 5:09 am

adumbrate


1. (v) give to understand; "I adumbrated that I did not like his wife"

2. (v) describe roughly or briefly; "sketch the outline of the book"
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Postby ShelG » Sun Nov 21, 2004 8:40 pm

Curtail ~ cur·tail

tr.v. cur·tailed, cur·tail·ing, cur·tails, cur·tailment n.

To cut short or reduce.
See Synonyms at shorten.


[Middle English curtailen, to restrict, probably blend of Old French courtauld, docked; see curtal, and Middle English taillen, to cut (from Old French tailler. See tailor).]
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