The Etymology Game! (please read first post)

Come on over to Tom's House for the lighter side of Tolkien Fandom. Remember Tom's House is both powerful and innocent, so keep it clean and nice.

Postby Orangeblossom_Bumbleroot » Wed Oct 27, 2004 8:18 am

ca·liph also ca·lif or kha·lif ( P ) Pronunciation Key (klf, klf)
n.
A leader of an Islamic polity, regarded as a successor of Muhammad and by tradition always male.


[Middle English calife, from Old French, from Arabic alfa, successor (to Muhammad), caliph, from alafa, to succeed. See lp in Semitic Roots.]

cali·phal adj.
User avatar
Orangeblossom_Bumbleroot
Shield Bearer

 
Posts: 469
Joined: Mon Sep 09, 2002 8:45 pm
Top

Postby Wasara » Wed Oct 27, 2004 8:49 am

swayer



1. (n) a person who rules or commands; "swayer of the universe"
User avatar
Wasara
Mariner

 
Posts: 5412
Joined: Fri Aug 27, 2004 2:57 am
Location: Sailing The Sea Of Cheese
Top

Postby Idhren » Wed Oct 27, 2004 9:05 am

Persuader
a. One who or that which persuades. Const. of a person, formerly also of an action, etc.: see the verb.

1538 ELYOT Dict., Persuasor, a perswader or inducer to do a thynge. 1550 BALE Apol. 86b, Neyther is S. Paule..a persuader of vowes makynge. 1580 Reg. Privy Council Scot. III. 281 Blamit as the persuaderis of his Hienes in sindrie thingis. 1603 KNOLLES Hist. Turks (1638) 148 The euill persuaders of rebellion preuailed with him. 1654 R. CODRINGTON tr. Iustine xxxviii. 458 His friend..was both his Companion, and his perswader to undertake this journey. 1718 ROWE tr. Lucan vi. 94 The sweet Perswader speaks. 1838 F. A. KEMBLE Resid. in Georgia (1863) 35 The canoes..are very inviting persuaders to this species of exercise.
User avatar
Idhren
Ranger of the North
 
Posts: 2026
Joined: Mon Aug 23, 2004 12:17 pm
Top

Postby Wasara » Wed Oct 27, 2004 10:20 am

inducer


1. (n) someone who tries to persuade or induce or lead on

2. (n) an agent capable of activating specific genes
User avatar
Wasara
Mariner

 
Posts: 5412
Joined: Fri Aug 27, 2004 2:57 am
Location: Sailing The Sea Of Cheese
Top

Postby Orangeblossom_Bumbleroot » Wed Oct 27, 2004 12:17 pm

whee·dle ( P ) Pronunciation Key (hwdl, wdl)
v. whee·dled, whee·dling, whee·dles
v. tr.
To persuade or attempt to persuade by flattery or guile; cajole.
To obtain through the use of flattery or guile: a swindler who wheedled my life savings out of me.

v. intr.
To use flattery or cajolery to achieve one's ends.

[Origin unknown.]

wheedler n.
wheedling·ly adv.
User avatar
Orangeblossom_Bumbleroot
Shield Bearer

 
Posts: 469
Joined: Mon Sep 09, 2002 8:45 pm
Top

Postby Wasara » Wed Oct 27, 2004 12:35 pm

coax


1. (n) a transmission line for high-frequency signals

2. (v) influence or urge by gentle urging,caressing,or flattering; "he coaxed her into going along
User avatar
Wasara
Mariner

 
Posts: 5412
Joined: Fri Aug 27, 2004 2:57 am
Location: Sailing The Sea Of Cheese
Top

Postby Idhren » Wed Oct 27, 2004 5:28 pm

Flatter

1. a. intr. Of an animal, bird, etc.: To show delight or fondness (by wagging the tail, making a caressing sound, etc.). Const. upon, with. Obs.

c1386 CHAUCER Merch. T. 815 Lyk to the scorpioun..That flaterest with thin heed whan thou wilt stynge. 1387 TREVISA Higden (Rolls) II. 431 at foules at Diomedes temple springe water and flatere wi e Grees. 1583 HOLLYBAND Campo di Fior 41 Here is a meery litle dogge: See how he flattereth with his tale. 1607 TOPSELL Four-f. Beasts 105 She [the Cat] hath one voice to beg and to complain..another among hir own kind, by flattring, by hissing, by puffing, by spitting. Ibid. 160 Dogges..who would fawne & gently flatter vpon all those which came chastly & religiously to worship there.



b. trans. Rarely used in Fr. sense: To touch or stroke lightly and caressingly. Obs.

[1580 BARET Alv. F666 To feele and handle gently, to flatter, to dallie, and deceiue, palpo.] 1599 H. BUTTES Dyets drie Dinner M, Trout is a fish that loveth to be flattered and clawed in the water. 1650 [see FLATTERING people. a. 4]. 1725 BRADLEY Fam. Dict. s.v. Bee, The Bees that compose his Train..flatter him with their Trumps.



2. To try to please or win the favour of (a person) by obsequious speech or conduct; to court, fawn upon. Also intr. to flatter with.

1340 Ayenb. 61 e blondere defende and excuse and wrye e kueades and e zennes of ham et he wyle ulateri. c1380 WYCLIF Sel. Wks. III. 344 es men..flateren hem, for ei hopen to haue wynnyng of hem. 1387 TREVISA Higden (Rolls) III. 315 if ou woldest flatere wi Denys e kyng, ou schuldest nout wasche ese wortes. c1440 Promp. Parv. 164 Flateryn, adulor. 1559 Mirr. Mag., Worcester ii, To frayne the truth, the living for to flatter. 1593 SHAKES. Rich. II, II. i. 88, I mocke my name (great King) to flatter thee. a1744 POPE Epitaph xv, One poor Poet..Who never flatter'd Folks like you. 1764 GOLDSM. Trav. 362 Yet think not..I mean to flatter kings, or court the great. 1830 TENNYSON Mermaid 43 The bold merry mermen..would sue me, and woo me, and flatter me. 1842 LYTTON Zanoni I. i. 5 Yet was he thoroughly unsocial. He formed no friends, flattered no patrons.



absol. 1393 LANGL. P. Pl. C. IX. 147 Ancres and heremites at eten bote at nones, And freres at flateren not. 1413 Pilgr. Sowle (Caxton 1483) IV. xxxiii. 82 Them nedeth nought to glosen ne to flateren, for..hope of yeftes.



3. To praise or compliment unduly or insincerely. Const. of. Also in weaker sense, to gloss over, palliate (faults), speak too leniently to (an offender). Formerly also intr. to flatter with.

a1225 Ancr. R. 222 (MS. Cleop. C. vi) Men..et flattere [other texts faltre, flakere] hire of freolac. 1535 COVERDALE Prov. xxviii. 23 He that rebuketh a man, shall fynde more fauoure at ye last, then he that flatreth him. 1552 LATIMER Serm. 31 Jan., Here learne..not to flatter with any body when they do..wickedly, for Christ, perceauing his disciples to be vnbeleuers, flattered them not, but..rebuked them for their faultes. 1659 RAY Corr. (1848) 2, I would not be flattered, I am not so fond of my own conceits. 1738 POPE Epil. Sat. I. 86 Let..ev'ry Fool and Knave Be grac'd thro' Life, and flatter'd in his Grave. Mod. ‘Your beautiful voice’ ‘Ah! you are flattering me.’



absol. 1500-20 ? DUNBAR Poems (1893) 310 Wryte I of liberalitie..Than will thay say I flatter quyte. 1548 HALL Chron. Edw. IV, 198, I neither dare nor wil write..lest..some men might thynke that I flattered a litle. 1782 COWPER Table T. 88 The lie that flatters I abhor the most.



4. To gratify the vanity or self-esteem of; to make self-complacent; to make (one) feel honoured or distinguished. Also, To tickle (a person's vanity).

c1400 Rom. Rose 5941 Another shal have as moche..for right nought..If he can flater hir to hir pay. 1560 BIBLE (Genev.) Ps. xxxvi. 2 He flattereth himselfe in his owne eyes. 1601 SHAKES. Jul. C. II. i. 208 When I tell him, he hates Flatterers, He says, he does; being then most flattered. 1717 LADY M. W. MONTAGU Let. to Abbé Conti 1 Apr., It is the emperor's interest to flatter them. 1791 MRS. RADCLIFFE Rom. Forest viii, I am..flattered by the distinction you offer me. 1845 M. PATTISON Ess. (1889) I. 22 This was intended to flatter the bishop's vanity. a1864 PRESCOTT (Webster), Others he flattered by asking their advice.



transf. 1864 TENNYSON Aylmer's F. 175 A splendid presence flattering the poor roofs.



5. To play upon the vanity or impressionableness of (a person); to beguile or persuade with artful blandishments; to coax, wheedle. Const. from, into, to, out of. Also intr. to flatter with.

1500-20 DUNBAR Poems xxx. 43 In me was falset with every wicht to flatter. 1537 MATTHEW Judg. xvi. 5 Flatter with hym [1539 TAVERNER Flatter him] & se wherin hys great strenght lyeth. 1579 GOSSON Sch. Abuse (Arb.) 21 As waywarde children the more they bee flatered the worse they are. 1591 Troub. Raigne K. John II. (1611) 82 For Priests and women must be flattered. 1592 WARNER Alb. Eng. VII. xxxiv. (1612) 167 He flattered his Neeces from their mother. 1650 FULLER Pisgah II. i. §24. 65 Or did he hope..to flatter Heaven into a consent? 1667 MILTON P.L. x. 42 Man should be seduc't And flatter'd out of all, believing lies Against his Maker. 1706 PHILLIPS (ed. Kersey), Flatter, to coaks, soothe up or wheedle. 1833 ALISON Hist. Europe (1849) II. ix. §51. 276 You may easily flatter a tyrant: but to flatter twenty-five millions of people is as impossible as to flatter the Deity himself.



absol. 1611 BIBLE 1 Esdras iv. 31 The King was faine to flatter, that she might be reconciled to him againe.



6. To beguile, charm away (sorrow, etc.); also, to beguile, charm to (tears). arch.

1580 SIDNEY Arcadia I. (1629) 52 A place for pleasantnesse, not vnfit to flatter solitarinesse. 1597 SHAKES. Rich. III, IV. iv. 245 Flatter my sorrows with report of it. 1820 KEATS Eve. St. Agnes iii, Music's golden tongue Flatter'd to tears this aged man. 1871 R. ELLIS tr. Catullus lxviii. 39 If nor books I send nor flatter sorrow to silence.



7. a. To encourage or cheer (a person) with hopeful or pleasing representations; to inspire with hope, usually on insufficient grounds. Also, To foster (hopes). Formerly also intr. to flatter with.

1377 LANGL. P. Pl. B. xx. 109 Fortune gan flateren..o fewe..And byhight hem longe lyf. 1393 [see FLATTERING people. a. 2.] 1587 FLEMING Contn. Holinshed III. 1351/1 My lord, you are verie sicke, I will not flatter with you. 1592 SHAKES. Ven. & Ad. 989 Hope..doth flatter thee in thoughts vnlikely. 1597 2 Hen. IV, I. iii. 29 Flatt'ring himselfe with [Qo. in] Proiect of a power Much smaller, then the smallest of his Thoughts. 1601 Twel. N. I. v. 322 Desire him not to flatter with his Lord, Nor hold him up with hopes; I am not for him. 1730-1 Swift's Lett. (1766) II. 123 Now were you in vast hopes you should hear no more from me..but don't flatter yourself. 1762 H. WALPOLE Vertue's Anecd. Paint. (1765) I. vi. 137 The Carews..were flattered with the hopes of this match. 1794 PALEY Evid. II. v. (1817) 23 It was his business to have flattered the prevailing hopes. 1842 TENNYSON Two Voices 204 Wilt thou make everything a lie To flatter me that I may die? 1855 PRESCOTT Philip II, I. II. ix. 243 Men had flattered themsleves..with the expectation of some change for the better. 1890 Daily News 24 Nov. 3/5 The Irish filly never flattered her backers.



absol. 1593 SHAKES. Lucr. 172 Desire..sweetely flatters. 1913 Field 15 Nov. 1046/2 Two furlongs from home Maiden Erlegh looked most dangerous, but he flattered only to deceive. 1928 Daily Express 2 Aug. 12 Smirke..came through well..to settle Goodwin and Dakota, who had flattered in the run home.



b. To please with the belief, idea, or suggestion that. Now chiefly refl.

1592 SHAKES. Ven. & Ad. 978 Reuiuing ioy bids her reioyce, And flatters her, it is Adonis voyce. 1711 ADDISON Spect. No. 165 1 Their People might flatter themselves that Things are not so bad as they really are. 1753 HUME Let. 5 Jan. in Burton Life & Corr. (1846) I. 378 My friends flatter me..that I have succeeded. 1782 PRIESTLEY Corrupt. Chr. I. Pref. 13, I flatter myself..I have given reasonable satisfaction. a1796 BURNS ‘As I was a wandering’, I flatter my fancy I may get anither. 1844 DISRAELI Coningsby V. iv, They flattered themselves it might be done. 1883 STEVENSON Treasure Isl. IV. xvi, We flattered ourselves we should be able to give a good account of a half-dozen.



8. To ‘caress’, gratify (the eye, ear, etc.).
Johnson describes this as ‘a sense purely Gallick’; but it occurs in his own writings, and is now established.

1695 DRYDEN Observ. Du Fresnoy's Art Paint. 130 A Consort of Voices..pleasingly fills the Ears and flatters them. 1722 WOLLASTON Relig. Nat. ix. 206 He might..be flattered with some verdures and the smiles of a few daisies on the banks of the road. 1882 STEVENSON New Arab. Nts. (1884) 120 The beauty of the stone flattered the young clergyman's eyes.



absol. 1750 JOHNSON Rambler No. 80 2 The Hill flatters with an extensive View.



9. a. To represent too favourably; to exaggerate the good points of. Said esp. of painters, or the like.

1581 G. PETTIE Guazzo's Civ. Conv. I. (1586) 4 But if I flatter not my selfe, I have a whole minde within my crasie bodie. 1591 SHAKES. Two Gent. IV. iv. 192 Yet the Painter flatter'd her a little. 1665 BOYLE Occas. Refl. VI. x. 222 If Art have not flatter'd Nature. 1765 H. WALPOLE Vertue's Anecd. Paint. IV. 18 Oliver..said to him ‘Mr. Lely, I desire you would use all your skill to paint my picture truly like me, and not flatter me at all.’ 1768 Hist. Doubts 95 How much the characters of princes are liable to be flattered or misrepresented. 1885 E. GARRETT At any Cost x. 169 My friends do not think that my portrait flatters me.



absol. 1634 PRYNNE Documents agst. Prynne (Camden) 25 A Queene, in whose prayse it is impossible for a poett to fayn, or orator to flatter. 1758 HOME Agis Ded., A grateful imagination adorns its benefactor with every virtue, and even flatters with sincerity.



b. To show to the best advantage, make effective, emphasize the good points of.

1904 Westm. Gaz. 11 Feb. 4/2 A dark blue velvet will flatter diamonds remarkably. Ibid. 27 Aug. 2/3 The wickets at Nottingham..flatter batsmen enormously. 1909 Ibid. 27 Feb. 15/1 A good white shoe worn with a white dress flatters the foot immensely.



10. With adverbs. to flatter in (nonce-use): to usher in or help forward with flattery. to flatter up: (a) to indulge unduly, pamper, ‘coddle’; (b) to flatter extravagantly; to work (oneself) up into self-complacency; (c) nonce-use, to call up (a smile) by flattery.

1588 SHAKES. L.L.L. V. ii. 824 To flatter vp these powers of mine with rest. 1669 DRYDEN Tyrannick Love IV. i, I, like the Fiends, will flatter in his Doom. 1848 J. WATERWORTH Canons & Decrees Trent 38 No one ought to flatter himself up with faith alone. 1891 G. MEREDITH One of our Conq. III. xiii. 273 ‘We go’, Victor said to Nataly, and flattered-up a smile about her lips.



Hence flattered people. a.

c1440 Promp. Parv. 164 Flateryd, adulatus. 1665 MANLEY Grotius' Low C. Warres 165 His Mind was so elevated into a flattered Conceit of himself. 1714 SHAFTESBURY Misc. Refl. V. i, They become, like flatter'd Princes, impatient of Contradiction. 1725 YOUNG Love Fame i. 13 Flatter'd crimes of a licentious age, Reproach our silence. 1888 Sat. Rev. 23 June 773/2 The flattered monarch refused to interfere.

The Oxford English Dictionary
User avatar
Idhren
Ranger of the North
 
Posts: 2026
Joined: Mon Aug 23, 2004 12:17 pm
Top

Postby ShelG » Wed Oct 27, 2004 5:40 pm

Inveigle ~ in·vei·gle

tr.v. To win over by coaxing, flattery, or artful talk. To obtain by cajolery: inveigled a free pass to museum.

in·vei·gled, in·vei·gling, in·vei·gles

in·veigle·ment n.
in·veigler n.


[Middle English envegle, alteration of Old French aveugler, to blind, from aveugle, blind, from Vulgar Latin *aboculus : Latin ab-, away from; see ab-1 + Latin oculus, eye (probably loan-translation of Gaulish exsops : exs-, from + ops, eye); see okw- in Indo-European Roots.]
User avatar
ShelG
Citizen of Imladris
 
Posts: 80
Joined: Mon Aug 09, 2004 5:34 am
Top

Postby Idhren » Wed Oct 27, 2004 5:42 pm

Coax


1. trans. To make a ‘cokes’ of, befool, impose upon, ‘take in’. Obs.

[Cf. 1616 B. JONSON Devil is an Ass II. i. (Speech 68), Why, we will make a Cokes of thee Wise Master, We will, my mistress, an absolute fine Cokes!] c1679 Roxb. Ballads VII. 9 We tell them 'tis not a penny we can take: We plead poverty before we have need, And thus we do coaks them most bravely indeed. 1806 Med. & Ph. Jrnl. (1807) 132 That practitioners would pay a little more attention to those authors who are out of fashion and laid upon the shelf, and not suffer themselves to be coaxed by an old practice in a modern garb.



2. a. To make a pet of; to pet, fondle, caress; to treat endearingly or with blandishment. Obs.

1589 PUTTENHAM Eng. Poesie I. viii. (Arb.) 36 Princes may giue a good Poet such conuenient countenaunce and also benefite as are due to an excellent artificer, though they neither kisse nor cokes them. 1611 COTGR. s.v. Dadée, Souffrir à vn enfant toutes ses dadées, to cocker or cokes it; to make a feddle or wanton of it. 1668 R. L'ESTRANGE Vis. Quev. iv. (1708) 98 Some I saw Caressing and Cokesing their Husbands, in the very moment they design'd to betray them. 1678 A. BEHN Sir P. Fancy III. ii, For my sake, dear, pardon him this one time [cokesing him]. 1694 R. L'ESTRANGE Fables ccxix. (1714) 238 The Nurse..had chang'd her Note; for she was then Muzzling and Cokesing of it. 1794 SOUTHEY Botany-Bay Eclog. II, They kiss'd me, coax'd me, robb'd me, and betray'd me. 1831 Cat's Tail 25 Those tender attentions, that coaxing and coddling.



b. to coax up: to cocker up, coddle up. Obs.

1586 A. DAY Eng. Secretary II. (1625) 48 They soothe up your passions, and cokes up your humors. 1683 [see COAXING vbl. n.].



3. a. To influence or persuade by caresses, flattery, or blandishment. Johnson says ‘To wheedle, to flatter, to humour: a low word’; cf. quot. 1663.

1663 Flagellum; or O. Cromwell (1672) 159 And sometimes to cokes the neighbouring Rusticks, give them a Buck he had hunted. 1835 W. IRVING Tour Prairies 248 ‘He try to coax me,’ said Beatte, ‘but I say nowe must part’. 1875 MCLAREN Serm. Ser. II. vii. 122 A wholesome obstinancy in the right that will neither be bribed nor coaxed nor bullied.



b. Const. to do a thing; into an action, etc.

1806-7 J. BERESFORD Miseries Hum. Life (1826) X. xlvi, Dragging the table..over an uneven floor, in hopes of coaxing it to stand on more than two legs. 1833 H. MARTINEAU Manch. Strike x. 111 She coaxed her father into giving them a ball. 1862 MERIVALE Rom. Emp. (1865) VI. lii. 270 It was Seneca's principle..to coax, rather than drive, his pupil into virtue. 1862 Union 11 Apr. 230, I succeeded in coaxing Papa..to allow me to teach in the school.



c. With various other extensions, as to coax away, down, forth, up: to persuade or entice to go or come away, etc.; to coax (a thing) out of (a person): to get it out of him by coaxing.

1700 J. A. ASTRY tr. Saavedra-Faxardo II. 101 Women..coaks them out of their Husbands, and so tell 'em again to others; as it was in that secret which Maximus told his wife. a1839 PRAED Poems (1864) I. 342 They coaxed away the beldame's wrath. 1859 GEN. P. THOMPSON Audi Alt. II. lxxxvii. 56 Are these men to be coaxed down by ginger~bread? 1889 AMÉLIE RIVES Quick or Dead? (Rtldg.) 20 An old spinet..from which Miss Fridiswig used to coax forth ghastly jinkings..on Sunday afternoons.



d. To urge (a thing) by gentle means.

1841 S. WARREN Ten Thou. a Year I. vii, After coaxing up the fire, I will proceed to tell you. 1866 MEREDITH Vittoria xxiv, Angelo knelt and coaxed the fire.



4. To persuade to believe (to be, etc.); to flatter or wheedle into the belief. Obs.

1676 MARVELL Mr. Smirke Wks. 1875 IV. 69 So the Exposer would now cokes the lay multitude, whom before he call'd ‘the hundred thousands’, and for their simplicity ‘excusable from subscribing the Thirty-nine Articles’, to be grown on the suddain so very wise men, that, etc.



5. intr. To employ coaxing.

1706 FARQUHAR Recruiting Off. I. i, I coax! I wheedle! I'm above it. 1784 New Spectator XII. 1/2 What with palming one fellow, kissing another, and coaxing with thousands, [she] has driven me almost horn-mad. 1878 Masque Poets 52 The gentlest..plead and coax For the sad strange story of Jasper Oakes.




Oxford English Dictionary
User avatar
Idhren
Ranger of the North
 
Posts: 2026
Joined: Mon Aug 23, 2004 12:17 pm
Top

Postby Wasara » Thu Oct 28, 2004 4:56 am

coax cable



1. (n) a transmisson line for high-frequency signals
User avatar
Wasara
Mariner

 
Posts: 5412
Joined: Fri Aug 27, 2004 2:57 am
Location: Sailing The Sea Of Cheese
Top

Postby Orangeblossom_Bumbleroot » Thu Oct 28, 2004 11:16 am

trans·mis·sion ( P ) Pronunciation Key (trns-mshn, trnz-)
n.

The act or process of transmitting.
The fact of being transmitted.
Something, such as a message, that is transmitted.
An automotive assembly of gears and associated parts by which power is transmitted from the engine to a driving axle. Also called gearbox.
The sending of a signal, picture, or other information from a transmitter.


[Latin trnsmissi, trnsmissin-, a sending across, from trnsmissus, past participle of trnsmittere, to transmit. See transmit.]

trans·missive (-msv) adj.
User avatar
Orangeblossom_Bumbleroot
Shield Bearer

 
Posts: 469
Joined: Mon Sep 09, 2002 8:45 pm
Top

Postby Wasara » Thu Oct 28, 2004 11:46 am

transmittal


1. (n) the act of sending message; causing a message to be transmitted
User avatar
Wasara
Mariner

 
Posts: 5412
Joined: Fri Aug 27, 2004 2:57 am
Location: Sailing The Sea Of Cheese
Top

Postby Orangeblossom_Bumbleroot » Fri Oct 29, 2004 10:34 am

dis·patch also des·patch ( P ) Pronunciation Key (d-spch)
tr.v. dis·patched, dis·patch·ing, dis·patch·es
To relegate to a specific destination or send on specific business. See Synonyms at send1.

To complete, transact, or dispose of promptly.
To eat up (food); finish off (a dish or meal).
To put to death summarily.

n.
The act of sending off, as to a specific destination.
Dismissal or rejection of something regarded as unimportant or unworthy of consideration: “[his] breezy dispatch of another Establishment fiction writer” (Christopher Hitchens).
The act of putting to death.
Speed in performance or movement. See Synonyms at haste.
(also dspch)
A written message, particularly an official communication, sent with speed.
An important message sent by a diplomat or an officer in the armed forces.
(also dspch) A news item sent to a news organization, as by a correspondent.
An organization or conveyance for delivering goods.


[Spanish despachar, or Italian dispacciare both probably ultimately from Old Provençal empachar, to impede, from Vulgar Latin *impctre, frequentative of Latin impingere, to dash against. See impinge.]
User avatar
Orangeblossom_Bumbleroot
Shield Bearer

 
Posts: 469
Joined: Mon Sep 09, 2002 8:45 pm
Top

Postby Wasara » Sat Oct 30, 2004 1:30 am

polish off


1. (v) finish a task completely; "he finally polished off this homework assignment"

2. (v) finish eating all the food on ones plate or on the table; "She polished off the remaining potatoes"

3. (v) kill intentionally and premeditation; "The mafia boss ordered his enemies polished off"
User avatar
Wasara
Mariner

 
Posts: 5412
Joined: Fri Aug 27, 2004 2:57 am
Location: Sailing The Sea Of Cheese
Top

Postby ShelG » Sat Oct 30, 2004 7:20 am

Gormandize ~ gor·mand·ize v.

gor·mand·ized, gor·mand·iz·ing, gor·mand·iz·es
v. intr.
To eat gluttonously; gorge.

v. tr.
To devour (food) gluttonously.


gormand·izer n.


gormandize

\Gor"mand*ize\, v. i. & t. [imp. & p. p. Gormandized; p. pr. & vb. n. Gormandizing.] [F. gourmandise gluttony. See Gormand.] To eat greedily; to swallow voraciously; to feed ravenously or like a glutton. --Shak.


gormandize

v : overeat or eat immodestly; make a pig of oneself; "She stuffed herself at the dinner"; "The kids binged on icecream" [syn: gorge, ingurgitate, overindulge, glut, englut, stuff, engorge, overgorge, overeat, gormandise, gourmandize, binge, pig out, satiate, scarf out]


[From gourmandise, gluttony (obsolete).]
User avatar
ShelG
Citizen of Imladris
 
Posts: 80
Joined: Mon Aug 09, 2004 5:34 am
Top

Postby Wasara » Sat Oct 30, 2004 7:53 am

satiate


1. (adj) supplied (especially fed) to satisfaction

2. (v) overeat or eat in modestly; make a pig of oneself

3. (v) fill to satisfaction; "I`m sated"
User avatar
Wasara
Mariner

 
Posts: 5412
Joined: Fri Aug 27, 2004 2:57 am
Location: Sailing The Sea Of Cheese
Top

Postby Idhren » Sat Oct 30, 2004 8:47 am

Guzzle

1. trans. To swallow (liquor, rarely food) greedily or to excess. Also with down, up.

1583 GOLDING Calvin on Deut. li, Wyne which they gussel and quaffe vp without measure or reason. 1609 W. M. Man in Moone (1857) 90 He hath..gusled downe his throate more then Cleopatra quaffed in a bravado to Mark Anthonie. 1687 T. BROWN Saints in Uproar Wks. 1730 I. 80 How many gallons have you guzzled for your morning's draught? 1692 TRYON Good House-w. xix. 175 Men and Women addict themselves..to guzzle down the Richest Wines daily. 1711 RAMSAY Elegy on M. Johnston 22 We guzl'd Scuds Till we cou'd scarce..Cast off our duds. 1808 C. K. SHARPE Corr. (1888) I. 336 How it annoyed me to behold Belvidera [Mrs. Siddons] guzzle boiled beef and mustard, swill streams of porter [etc.]. 1826 DISRAELI Viv. Grey II. viii, Guzzling his venison pasties. 1841 THACKERAY Mem. Gormandising Wks. 1886 XXIII. 350 It is absurd to be guzzling wine at fifteen francs a bottle.



transf. 1638 RAWLEY tr. Bacon's Life & Death (1650) 28 The Spirits are to be put into such a temperament, and degree of activity; That they should not (as He saith) Drink or Guzzle the juyces of the Body, but Sip them onely.



2. To consume or dissipate (time, money, etc.) in guzzling. With away, down.

1653 MANTON Exp. James v. 5 It is prodigious in poor men to guzzle and drink away their days. 1658 W. GURNALL Chr. in Arm. verse 14 x. §2 (1669) 42/2 He that should save his money from guzling it down his throat. 1726 AMHERST Terræ Fil. i. 4 To see the virtuous munificence of founders..guzzled down in hogsheads of wine. c1797 Chronicle in Spirit Publ. Jrnls. (1799) I. 356, I do not mean you should guzzle away all that large stock of money. 1895 ‘ROSEMARY’ Under the Chilterns 188 An' 'ere's me an' the childern in rags..an' you guzzlin' away down at the public wot should go to put cloes on their backs.



3. intr. To drink largely or greedily, to ‘swill’.

1579-80 NORTH Plutarch (1595) 880 They..passed away the night in guzling and drinking drunk. 1618 E. ELTON Compl. Sanct. Sinner (1622) 240 Many sit guzzeling in the ale-house. 1647 TRAPP Comm. Eph. v. 4 Some men as ducks have their noses alwaies guzling in the gutter of obscene talk. 1784 COWPER Task IV. 473 There sit,..guzzling deep, the boor, The lackey, and the groom. 1793 WOLCOT (P. Pindar) Ep. to the Pope Wks. 1812 III. 208 In vice's drunken Cup for ever guzzling. 1855 MACAULAY Hist. Eng. xv. III. 519 If he chose to shoot and guzzle at his country seat when important business was under consideration at Westminster.



4. trans. To seize by the throat, choke, throttle; to strangle, kill. (Cf. GUZZLE n. 4.) slang and dial.

1885 F. GORDON Pyotshaw 318 Guzzle, to choke violently. 1916 JOYCE Portrait of Artist (1917) iv. 195 Duck him! Guzzle him now, Towser! 1931 D. RUNYON Guys & Dolls (1932) 186 He will be safe from being guzzled by some of Black Mike's or Benny's guys. 1960 Observer 17 July 9/8 ‘Can't you..guzzle your friends, Hugh?’.. North of the Border it [sc. the word ‘guzzle’] does not mean to stuff oneself: apparently it means to gag.



Hence guzzledom nonce-wd.

1895 A. NUTT in K. Meyer Voy. Bran I. 207 A marvellous land of Cockayne, of gorging guzzledom, of bursting fatness.

Oxford English Dictionary
User avatar
Idhren
Ranger of the North
 
Posts: 2026
Joined: Mon Aug 23, 2004 12:17 pm
Top

Postby Wasara » Sat Oct 30, 2004 9:17 am

imbibe


1. (v) receive into the mind and retain; "Imbibe ethical principles"

2. (v) take in liquids

3. (v) take in,also metaphorically; "the sponge imbibe water well"; "She imbibed the strenght from the minister`s words"

4. (v) take into solution,as of gas,light or heat
User avatar
Wasara
Mariner

 
Posts: 5412
Joined: Fri Aug 27, 2004 2:57 am
Location: Sailing The Sea Of Cheese
Top

Postby Idhren » Sat Oct 30, 2004 9:52 am

Ingest

1. trans. To put in, push in, thrust in. Obs.

1617 COLLINS Def. Bp. Ely II. viii. 343 When he cannot aspire thether himselfe, he ingests in other partners and compossessioners, he cares not whome.



2. spec. To introduce (aliment) into the stomach (or mouth); to take in (food).

1620 VENNER Via Recta viii. 164 It is most hurtfull to the body to ingest nourishment vpon nourishment not digested. 1665 G. HARVEY Advice agst. Plague 5 Arsenick ingested within the Body..immediatly effects enormous Vomits. 1709 BLAIR in Phil. Trans. XXVII. 98 How can Aliments be ingested into the Mouth, and not pass over by the Larynx? 1848 CARPENTER Anim. Phys. i. (1872) 27 A mouth and stomach..extemporized, as it were on each occasion that aliment is ingested. 1878 BELL Gegenbaur's Comp. Anat. 16 At times, indeed, we can see the protoplasm ingesting food.

Oxford English Dictionary
User avatar
Idhren
Ranger of the North
 
Posts: 2026
Joined: Mon Aug 23, 2004 12:17 pm
Top

Postby Wasara » Sat Oct 30, 2004 10:03 am

assimilate


1. (v) become similar to one`s enviroment; "Immigrants often want to assimilate quickly"

2. (v) make similar

3. (v) become similar in sound; in phonetics

4. (v) take into solution,as of gas,light or heat
User avatar
Wasara
Mariner

 
Posts: 5412
Joined: Fri Aug 27, 2004 2:57 am
Location: Sailing The Sea Of Cheese
Top

Postby Mr.bunny » Sat Oct 30, 2004 10:12 am

ab·sorb

1. To take (something) in through or as through pores or interstices.
2. To occupy the full attention, interest, or time of; engross. See Synonyms at monopolize.
3. To retain (radiation or sound, for example) wholly, without reflection or transmission.
4. To take in; assimilate: immigrants who were absorbed into the social mainstream.
5. To learn; acquire: “Matisse absorbed the lesson and added to it a new language of color” (Peter Plagen).
6. To receive (an impulse) without echo or recoil: a fabric that absorbs sound; a bumper that absorbs impact.
7. To assume or pay for (a cost or costs).
8. To endure; accommodate: couldn't absorb the additional hardships.
9. To use up; consume: The project has absorbed all of our department's resources.

[Middle English, to swallow up, from Old French absorber, from Latin absorbere : ab-, away; + sorbere, to suck.]

*plop*
User avatar
Mr.bunny
Mariner
 
Posts: 5005
Joined: Sun Jul 15, 2001 12:13 am
Top

Postby Idhren » Sat Oct 30, 2004 10:15 am

Permeate

trans. To pass, spread, or diffuse itself through; to penetrate, pervade, saturate. (Of things material or immaterial.)

1660 BOYLE New Exp. Phys. Mech. xvii. 120 Numbers of them [emanations] do always permeate our Air. 1695 WOODWARD Nat. Hist. Earth III. i. (1723) 136 This Heat..permeating the Interstices of the Sand, Earth, or other Matter. a1704 in Somers Tracts II. 234 All held a vital Principle that doth permeate the whole World. 1801 SOUTHEY Thalaba V. i, He..felt the coolness permeate every limb. 1875 Lyell's Princ. Geol. II. III. xli. 420 There are marvellously few species which permeate the whole of the archipelagos. 1880 T. A. SPALDING Eliz. Demonol. 31 This intense credulousness..permeated all classes of society.



b. intr. with through, into, among, etc.: To penetrate, diffuse itself.

1656 STANLEY Hist. Philos. v. (1701) 211/1 Sublunary invisible Deities, which permeate through the Elements of Matter. 1788 T. TAYLOR Proclus I. 64 The reasons or proportions of abundance and sterility, permeate through all the mathematical disciplines. 1863 S. WILBERFORCE Sp. Missions (1874) 14 Producing its own proper effect upon the heathen among whom it permeates.



Hence permeating people. a.

1664 EVELYN Sylva xxx, [To separate] stony particles from that permeating water. 1684 BOYLE Porousn. Anim. & Solid Bod. iv. 37 The Penetrant, or Permeating Fumes. 1810 SOUTHEY Kehama VII. v, The permeating light Shed through their substance thin a varying hue.




Oxford English Dictionary
User avatar
Idhren
Ranger of the North
 
Posts: 2026
Joined: Mon Aug 23, 2004 12:17 pm
Top

Postby Wasara » Sat Oct 30, 2004 11:25 am

pervade


1. (v) spread or diffuse through; "An atmosphere of distrust has pervaded this administration"; "music pervaded the entire building"
User avatar
Wasara
Mariner

 
Posts: 5412
Joined: Fri Aug 27, 2004 2:57 am
Location: Sailing The Sea Of Cheese
Top

Postby Idhren » Sat Oct 30, 2004 12:15 pm

Percolate

1. a. trans. To cause (a liquid) to pass through the interstices of a porous body or medium; to strain or filter (naturally or artificially). Loosely, To cause (a finely divided solid) to trickle or pass through pores or minute apertures, to sift. Now rare.

1626 BACON Sylva §396 Springs on the Tops of High-Hills are the best: For..they..are more Percolated thorow a great Space of Earth. 1658 EVELYN Fr. Gard. (1675) 292 You shall percolat it through a sieve or course cloath. 1715 tr. Pancirollus' Rerum Mem. I. IV. x. 190 Strainers, through which they percolated Snow to cool their Wines. c1842 E. J. LANCE Cottage Farmer 23 Oatmeal..undressed, percolated between the fingers into boiling water.



b. fig.

a1677 HALE Prim. Orig. Man. II. i. 129 The Evidences of Fact are as it were percolated through a vast Period of Ages, and many very obscure to us. 1808 BENTHAM Sc. Reform 48 Double-refined, and treble-refined, by being percolated through the lips and pens of Commissioners and Commissioners' Clerks, and Agents, and Writers to the Signet. 1970 P. LAURIE Scotland Yard iv. 92 Churchill's funeral was ten years' planning, and it probably contained, percolated through a succession of intermediate heroes, elements of Nelson's. 1978 Time 6 Nov. 28/2 Connecticut's Ella Grasso, the first woman to win a governorship in her own right, says these victories will percolate women into office in a few years.



c. To prepare (coffee) in a percolator.

1966 New Statesman 3 June 819/1 First found percolating stale morning coffee in his office. 1974 ‘J. ROSS’ Burning of Billy Toober xiv. 127 Rogers made the mortuary in twenty minutes, not stopping to shave or percolate coffee. 1978 N. J. CRISP London Deal v. 72 The man~servant was percolating coffee.



2. a. intr. Said of a liquid: To pass through a porous substance or medium; to filter, ooze, or trickle through.

1684 BOYLE Porousn. Anim. & Solid Bod. vi. 94 A tradition, that in..the West Indies they have..large Vessels, wherein they put water to percolate, as it were, through a strainer. 1687 A. LOVELL tr. Thevenot's Trav. II. 62 Through these Jars the Water transpires and percolates into an earthen Vessel underneath. 1726 SWIFT Gulliver III. v, Extracting the nitre, and letting the aqueous or fluid particles percolate. 1813 BAKEWELL Introd. Geol. (1815) 109 The caverns have been formed by the agency of water percolating through natural fissures. 1878 HUXLEY Physiogr. 24 The water which has percolated through the sandy beds.



b. fig. (cf. filter, trickle.)

1867 LEWES Hist. Philos. (ed. 3) II. 399 That influence..has percolated down to the most ordinary intelligences. 1876 GLADSTONE Homeric Synchr. 251 The worship of Isis had percolated at several points into the Greek Peninsula. 1934 C. LAMBERT Music Ho! III. 185 Oriental influences..have percolated naturally through these racial frontiers. 1935 B. MALINOWSKI Coral Gardens II. VI. 244 The magic percolates,..so that practically everybody in the village knows it. 1977 P. D. JAMES Death of Expert Witness III. 128 News percolated through a village community by a process of verbal osmosis.



3. trans. Of a liquid: To ooze or filter through (a porous body or medium); to permeate.

1794 SULLIVAN View Nat. I. 258 It suffers that rain to percolate the earth. 1799 KIRWAN Geol. Ess. 118 Water percolating the pores of the basalt. 1885 R. BUCHANAN Master of Mine vii, It was actually percolated with sea~water oozing through the solid granitic mass.



fig. 1865 MERIVALE Rom. Emp. VIII. lxvii. 306 A senate..so freely percolated by the blood of the lower classes. 1965 New Statesman 7 May 737/2 One reason why this has so slowly percolated British consciousness..is British reporting.



4. intr. To walk, to stroll. U.S. slang.

1942 Z. N. HURSTON in A. Dundes Mother Wit (1973) 223/1 Then he would..percolate on down the Avenue. 1945 L. SHELLY Jive Talk Dict. 15/2 Percolate, to meander.



Hence percolated people. a.; percolating vbl. n. and people. a.; percolating filter, a type of filter used in the treatment of sewage, usu. after the removal of suspended solids, consisting of a bed of inert, porous material such as crushed rock through which the sewage is allowed to percolate, so that noxious organic matter is removed by aerobic micro-organisms.

1694 ‘S. S.’ Loyal & Impart. Satirist 22 In you Socratick Wisdom do's survive And flow with purer percolated streams. 1864 W. K. TWEEDIE Lakes & Rivers of Bible i. 20 Like percolating water it [bitumen] exudes through the veins into the wells. 1872 C. KING Mountain. Sierra Nev. ix. 191 Under the influence of the..constant percolating of surface waters. 1880 GEIKIE Phys. Geog. iv. 246 Limestone is liable to be dissolved and removed by percolating rain-water. 1901 S. BARWISE Bacterial Purification of Sewage iv. 37 The Commissioners in their Report speak of two artificial filtration processesContact Beds and Continuous Filtration. In this book I have adopted the phrase ‘Percolating Filters’, instead of that of ‘Continuous Filters’, because some of the continuous filters are worked intermittently, and intermittent continuous filtration is a verbal contradiction. 1936 [see BACTERIUM 2]. 1972 Water Research VI. 781 In the United Kingdom conventional sewage treatment by sedimentation plus secondary treatment by percolating filters or activated sludge plants is not normally adequate to provide an effluent acceptable for re-use.

Oxford English Dictionary
User avatar
Idhren
Ranger of the North
 
Posts: 2026
Joined: Mon Aug 23, 2004 12:17 pm
Top

Postby Wasara » Sat Oct 30, 2004 12:29 pm

gain vigor


1. (v) gain or regain energy
User avatar
Wasara
Mariner

 
Posts: 5412
Joined: Fri Aug 27, 2004 2:57 am
Location: Sailing The Sea Of Cheese
Top

Postby ShelG » Sat Oct 30, 2004 2:24 pm

Revivify ~ re·viv·i·fy tr.v.

re·viv·i·fied, re·viv·i·fy·ing, re·viv·i·fies

To impart new life, energy, or spirit to. See Synonyms at revive.


[French revivifier, from Old French, to come back to life, from Latin *revvificre, to revivify : Latin re-, re- + Latin vvificre, to vivify; see vivify.]
User avatar
ShelG
Citizen of Imladris
 
Posts: 80
Joined: Mon Aug 09, 2004 5:34 am
Top

Postby Idhren » Sat Oct 30, 2004 3:48 pm

Reincarnate

trans. and intr. To incarnate anew.

1858 SEARS Athan. III. iii. 272 The Pharisee believed that..only a part of them [the dead] would be re-incarnated, enter again into their former bodies. 1880 Contemp. Rev. Feb. 199 A body which could appear and disappear..by being, as it were, re-incarnated at one time, and dis-incarnated at another. 1892 Pall Mall G. 13 Sept. 3/1 A man dies; his ‘Ego’ passes to the ‘spiritual planes’ of nature: after a long interval..it re-incarnates.



Hence reincarnated, reincarnating people. adjs.

1883 J. GILMOUR Mongols xvii. 199 Buddhism..with..its crowds of constantly reincarnating living Buddhas. 1897 M. KINGSLEY W. Africa x. 230 The idea I found regarding reincarnated diseases, existent among the Okÿon tribes.




OED
User avatar
Idhren
Ranger of the North
 
Posts: 2026
Joined: Mon Aug 23, 2004 12:17 pm
Top

Postby Orangeblossom_Bumbleroot » Sat Oct 30, 2004 6:49 pm

em·bod·y ( P ) Pronunciation Key (m-bd)
tr.v. em·bod·ied, em·bod·y·ing, em·bod·ies
To give a bodily form to; incarnate.
To represent in bodily or material form: “As John Adams embodied the old style, Andrew Jackson embodied the new” (Richard Hofstadter).
To make part of a system or whole; incorporate: laws that embody a people's values.
User avatar
Orangeblossom_Bumbleroot
Shield Bearer

 
Posts: 469
Joined: Mon Sep 09, 2002 8:45 pm
Top

Postby ShelG » Sat Oct 30, 2004 8:13 pm

Hypostatize ~ hy·pos·ta·tize tr.v.

hy·pos·ta·tized, hy·pos·ta·tiz·ing, hy·pos·ta·tiz·es
To ascribe material existence to.


[From Greek hupostatos, placed under, substantial, from huphistasthai, to stand under, exist : hupo, beneath; see hypo- + histasthai, middle voice of histanai, to set, place; see epistasis.]
User avatar
ShelG
Citizen of Imladris
 
Posts: 80
Joined: Mon Aug 09, 2004 5:34 am
Top

Postby Wasara » Sun Oct 31, 2004 2:14 am

reify


1. (v) consider an abstract concept to be real
User avatar
Wasara
Mariner

 
Posts: 5412
Joined: Fri Aug 27, 2004 2:57 am
Location: Sailing The Sea Of Cheese
Top

PreviousNext

Return to The Lighter Side: Tom's House

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests