The Etymology Game! (please read first post)

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Postby prmiller » Sun Oct 31, 2004 5:50 am

realia
Function: noun plural
Etymology: Late Latin, neuter plural of realis or real
Meaning: objects or activities used to relate classroom teaching to the real life especially of peoples studied.
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Postby ShelG » Sun Oct 31, 2004 8:59 am

Apparatus ~ ap·pa·rat·us n.

pl. apparatus or ap·pa·rat·us·es

An appliance or device for a particular purpose: an x-ray apparatus.
An integrated group of materials or devices used for a particular purpose: dental apparatus.

The totality of means by which a designated function is performed or a specific task executed, as in a system of government.
A political organization or an underground political movement. Also called apparat.
Physiology. A group or system of organs that collectively perform a specific function or process: the respiratory apparatus; the digestive apparatus.
The critical and source material that accompanies an edition of a text.


[Latin appartus, preparation, from past participle of apparre, to prepare : ad-, ad- + parre, to prepare; see per-1 in Indo-European Roots.]
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Postby Wasara » Sun Oct 31, 2004 9:06 am

Wilson cloud chamber


1. (n) apparatus that detects high-energy particles passing through a supersaturated vapor; each particle ionizes molecules along its path and small droplets condense on them to produce a visible track
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Postby ShelG » Sun Oct 31, 2004 10:40 am

( :shock: Wilson cloud chamber? that's a thinker)

Ionize ~ ion·ize v.

to convert wholly or partly into ions
to change or be changed into ions;
dissociate into ions, as a salt dissolved in water,
or become electrically charged, as a gas under the influece of radiation or electric charge.

Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary
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Postby Wasara » Sun Oct 31, 2004 11:11 am

(Yes he was,here is link: www.ulg.ac.be/masc/cloudchamber.htm )


change state



1. (v) undergo a transformation or a change of position or action; "The people change state against the President when he stole the election"
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Postby Idhren » Sun Oct 31, 2004 12:57 pm

Transformationalizeology


1. trans. The study of changing the form of; to change into another shape or form; to metamorphose.

c1340 HAMPOLE Prose Tr. 15 In transfourmynge of e saule in e Godhede. 1382 WYCLIF 2 Cor. iii. 18 Alle we..ben transformyd into the same ymage. c1400 MANDEVILLE (Roxb.) iv. 11 Of Ypocras daughter transformed from a womman to a dragoun. 1483 CAXTON Cato bvijb, This catte..is myn owne daughter the whiche by the plesure and wylle of god hath ben transfourmed in to a catte. 1548 UDALL, etc. Erasm. Par. Mark i. 5b, That thynges of muche contrarietie maye easely be transformed, and tourned one into an other. 1590 SHAKES. Com. Err. III. ii. 151 And I thinke, if my brest had not beene made of faith, and my heart of steele, she had transform'd me to a Curtull dog, & made me turne i' th wheele. 1660 F. BROOKE tr. Le Blanc's Trav. 268 When Magicians shall have power to transform a humane body. 1813 SCOTT Rokeby I. xxxi, The victor sees his fairy gold, Transform'd, when won, to drossy mold. 1827 FARADAY Chem. Manip. xxiv. (1842) 618 Transform several small crystals of sulphate of nickel into a large one. 1853 J. H. NEWMAN Hist. Sk. (1873) II. I. ii. 65 To Samarcand..we owe the art of transforming linen into paper.



b. transf. To study the change in character or condition; to alter in function or nature.

1556 J. HEYWOOD Spider & F. ii. 5 My whole estate..Is here transformde from myrth to miserie. 1675 TRAHERNE Chr. Ethics 270 Love..transformes the most virulent affections into smooth, healing, perfective pleasures. 1796 MORSE Amer. Geog. I. 306 He transformed an undisciplined body of peasantry into a regular army of soldiers. 1852 H. ROGERS Ecl. Faith (1853) 16 A volume, which has transformed them from savages into men, and from idolaters into Christians.



c. Math. To alter (a figure, expression, etc.) to another differing in form, but equal in quantity or value. More widely, to subject (any mathematical entity) to a transformation (TRANSFORMATION 2c). Also absol.

1743 EMERSON Fluxions 22 To transform the Fluxion.., assume [etc.]. 1884 tr. Lotze's Logic 332 These equations we transform in all sorts of ways by adding on new quantities, by subtracting others, by multiplication and division of the whole. 1885 WATSON & BURBURY Math. Th. Electr. & Magn. I. 155 We now proceed to transform this problem. 1972 M. KLINE Math. Thought xix. 427 Finding it difficult to evaluate in rectangular coordinates, he transformed to spherical coordinates. 1982 D. M. SCHNEIDER et al. Linear Algebra v. 181 The function f defined by the equation f(x) = x2. This function transforms a real number into a real number, namely its square.



d. Physics. To change (one form of energy) into another, as mechanical energy into electricity, or electric energy into light or heat.

1871 MAXWELL Theory of Heat (1875) 92 The total energy of any body or system of bodies is a quantity which can neither be increased nor diminished by any mutual action of those bodies, though it may be transformed into any of the forms of which energy is susceptible. 1878 W. GARNETT in Encycl. Brit. VIII. 208/2 All other forms of energy with which we are acquainted can be transformed into an equivalent amount of heat. 1902 J. LARMOR ibid. XXVIII. 164/2 There is a certain measurable quantity associated with each type of physical action..numerically identical with a corresponding quantity belonging to the new type into which it is transformed.



e. Electr. To change a current in potential, as from high voltage to low voltage, or in type, as from alternating to continuous. transform up, to raise the voltage while decreasing the current. transform down, to lower the voltage while increasing the current.

1883 tr. HOSPITALIER Mod. Applications of Electr. (ed. 2) I. 142 All these apparatus have a common character; they receive electricity and give out electricity, which they transform according to their individual properties. 1888 S. P. THOMPSON Dynamo-electr. Mach. 486 At the generating station the alternating currents of low potential were to be transformed by means of an induction-coil to currents of high potential. 1897 SLOANE Stand. Electr. Dict. (1902) 547 Such dynamo could transform currents up or down. 1902 S. P. THOMPSON Electr. & Magnet. 502 To transform continuous currents from one voltage to another it is necessary to employ a rotating apparatus, which is virtually a combination of a motor and a generator.



f. Molecular Biol. To change (a bacterial cell) into a genetically distinct kind by the introduction into it of DNA from another cell of the same or a closely related species.

1928 Jrnl. Hygiene XXVII. 150 An R strain is most readily transformed into the S variety when the killed culture used is of the same serological type as that from which the R strain was derived. 1947 Jrnl. Exper. Med. LXXXVI. 449 Repeated attempts both in vitro and in vivo to transform D39/Int53 to pneumococcus Type III were unsuccessful. 1981 L. L. MAYS Genetics vi. 274 Pieces of DNA of molecular weight less than 1·5 × 107 daltons cannot transform Haemophilus influenzae.



g. Cytology. To cause (a eukaryotic cell) to undergo transformation (TRANSFORMATION 3i).

1959 Jrnl. Nat. Cancer Inst. XXIII. 1035 (heading) Clonal analysis of variant cell lines transformed to malignant cells in tissue culture. 1982 Sci. Amer. Mar. 72/1 Analysis of the DNA of the Rous sarcoma virus has revealed a single gene capable of transforming cells.



2. intr. To undergo a change of form or nature; to change.

1597 BEARD Theatre God's Judgem. (1612) 68 Then did this iolly feast, to fast transforme. 1667 E. KING in Phil. Trans. II. 427 The Film does onely cover the Maggot, while she is transforming into an Ant. 1717 ADDISON tr. Ovid, Transf. Cycnus 11 His hair transforms to down, his fingers meet In skinny films, and shape his oary feet. 1747 GOULD Eng. Ants 52 The Female Aurelia's are generally the first which transform, and are those that make their Appearance in the Shape of large Flies. 1827 HOOD Mids. Fairies lxxxiii, Meanwhile I bade my pitying mates transform Like grasshoppers. 1893 HARKNESS & MORLEY Treat. Theory of Functions i. 14 If w = u + iv be a one-valued monogenic function of x + iy, the systems of orthogonal straight lines x = a, y = b transform into systems of orthogonal curves in the w- plane. 1970 PASSMORE & ROBSON Compan. Med. Stud. II. xxii. 9/2 The function of antigen at the surface of the lymphocyte is to induce it to transform and proliferate into active antibody-producing cells. 1971 Nature 26 Nov. 187/1 The larva then transforms to a pupa. 1982 Suppl. to O.E.D. III, Pseudoscalar sb., a quantity that transforms as a scalar under rotation but changes sign under reflection.




Oxford English Dictionary (mostly) :wink:
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Postby ShelG » Sun Oct 31, 2004 2:12 pm

:shock: Trans- forma - what? That is the longest word I have ever laid eyes upon!!!!!!!!!!
I can barely even pronounce it!

Transmogrification ~ trans·mogri·fi·cation n.

The act of changing completely or transforming, esp in a grotesque or strange manner.

The act of transmogrifying, or the state of being transmogrified; transformation. [Colloq.]


[Origin unknown.]
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Postby Idhren » Sun Oct 31, 2004 2:18 pm

The longest word in the english language is: PNEUMONOULTRAMICROSCOPICSILICOVOLCANOCONIOSIS.

Metamorphize

1. trans. To change the form or character of (something); to cause to undergo metamorphosis or metamorphism.

1576 F. CLEMENT Petie Schole sig. Ciiijv, Common playes which..metamorphize, transfigure, deforme, peruert and alter the harts of their haunters. 1596 J. HARINGTON New Disc. Aiax sig. E2, Messelina..was worthy..to haue bene metamorphized into Ajax. 1633 S. MARMION Fine Compan. III. ii. sig. E3v, I am now Metamorphis'd. 1748 Anson's Voy. III. viii. 383 The greatest part of them were strangely metamorphised by the heat of the hold. 1800 J. MURDOCK (title) The Beau Metamorphized. 1883 Catholic World Oct. 130 The old barracks have been metamorphized by a mansard roof, and a broad piazza running the whole length of the front of the building. 1893 Manufacturer & Builder Aug. 193/2 Sandstones, however, may in the long course of ages become so changed (or metamorphized, as the lithologists say). 1943 W. STEVENS Let. 29 Mar. (1967) 444 It would not help to change them to something else, any more than it would help to metamorphize this, that or the other (clouds into foam, living blossoms to blossoms without life, heat to a form of heat). 1991 Sci. Amer. May 29/2 A special magic available in two dimensions allows us to metamorphize anyons into bosons or fermionsor vice versaby imaginative manipulations of fantasy magnetic fields.



2. intr. = METAMORPHOSE v. 2b.

1943 Jrnl. Philos. 40 438 The élite appears to have metamorphized into the class of persons who are ‘high in the social scale’. 1966 Jrnl. Politics 28 168 Southern traditionalism is the chrysallis [sic] out of which Tennessee politics is metamorphising intowhat? 1996 Jerusalem Post (Electronic ed.) 19 Dec., A study of a wedding party that metamorphizes into a morgue of morbid Holocaust memories.



metamorphized a. now rare. metamorphizing n. rare.

1595 J. TRUSSEL Raptus I. Helenae 8 The *metamorphisde childe of Inachus, transformde by loue through Iunos ielousie. 1613 F. ROBARTES Revenue of Gospel 96 They are not men of reason..but metamorphised wolues, dogs, and tygres. 1678 E. HOWARD Man of Newmarket IV. i. 55 The Hare I hunted last was a metamorphis'd Witch. 1883 Philos. Trans. Royal Soc. 174 376 We may as well start fairly, looking upon the subjects of the present paper as greatly specialised, but not metamorphised. 1990 Renaissance Q. 43 160 The humanist tradition lived on in a powerful, though ‘metamorphized’ style in the Reformation.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1609 J. RAWLINSON Fishermen 8 The *metamorphising of men into fishes.
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Postby ShelG » Sun Oct 31, 2004 2:34 pm

:Q Thanx for that...I think. I'm lost after trying to pronounce the first 200 syllables of that one! Now that is officially the longest word I ever saw. Can you pronounce it?



al·ter ((ôltr)

v. al·tered, al·ter·ing, al·ters
v. tr.
To change or make different; modify: altered my will.
To adjust (a garment) for a better fit.
To castrate or spay (an animal, such as a cat or a dog).

v. intr.
To change or become different.


[Middle English alteren, from Old French alterer, from Medieval Latin alterre, from Latin alter, other. See al-1 in Indo-European Roots.]
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Postby Gwenneth_Eruwen » Sun Oct 31, 2004 6:58 pm

re·con·struct ( P ) Pronunciation Key (rkn-strkt)
tr.v. re·con·struct·ed, re·con·struct·ing, re·con·structs
To construct again; rebuild.
To assemble or build again mentally; re-create: reconstructed the sequence of events from the evidence.
To cause to adopt a new attitude or outlook: a diehard traditionalist who could not be reconstructed.

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Postby Wasara » Mon Nov 01, 2004 9:34 am

retrace


1. (v) of past events

2. (v) to go back over again,as of a route or steps; "we retraced the route we took last summer"
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Postby Orangeblossom_Bumbleroot » Mon Nov 01, 2004 9:49 am

re·hash ( P ) Pronunciation Key (r-hsh)
tr.v. re·hashed, re·hash·ing, re·hash·es
To bring forth again in another form without significant alteration: rehashing old ideas.
To discuss again.

n. (rhsh)
The act or result of rehashing: a rehash of an old plot.
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Postby Wasara » Mon Nov 01, 2004 10:01 am

recapitulate


1. (v) summrize briefly; "Let`s recapitulate main ideas"

2. (v) repeat the earlier theme of a musical composition

3. (v) repeat stages of evolutionary development during the embryonic phase of life; of animals
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Postby Orangeblossom_Bumbleroot » Mon Nov 01, 2004 10:56 am

re·cap1 ( P ) Pronunciation Key (r-kp)
tr.v. re·capped, re·cap·ping, re·caps
To replace a cap or caplike covering on: recapped the bottle.
To restore (a used tire of a motor vehicle) to usable condition by bonding new rubber onto the worn tread and lateral surface.

n. (rkp)
A tire that has been recapped.


n 1: a summary at the end that repeats the substance of a longer discussion [syn: recapitulation, review] 2: a used automobile tire that has been remolded to give it new treads [syn: retread] v : summarize briefly; "Let's recapitulate the main ideas" [syn: recapitulate]
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Postby Wasara » Mon Nov 01, 2004 11:05 am

retread


1. (v) a used automobile tire that has been remolded to give it new treads

2. (v) give new treads to (a tire)

3. (v) use again in altered form; "retread an old plot"
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Postby Orangeblossom_Bumbleroot » Mon Nov 01, 2004 1:09 pm

re·vamp ( P ) Pronunciation Key (r-vmp)
tr.v. re·vamped, re·vamp·ing, re·vamps
To patch up or restore; renovate.
To revise or reconstruct (a manuscript, for example).
To vamp (a shoe) anew.

n.
The act or an instance of revamping; a complete reorganization or revision.
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Postby Wasara » Mon Nov 01, 2004 1:18 pm

furbish up


1. (v) restore by replacing a part or putting together what was torn or broken; "She furbished her TV-set up"; "furbish my shoes up please"
[/i]
Last edited by Wasara on Mon Nov 01, 2004 1:29 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Postby Wynken21 » Mon Nov 01, 2004 1:23 pm

re·ju·ve·nate ( P ) Pronunciation Key (r-jv-nt)
tr.v. re·ju·ve·nat·ed, re·ju·ve·nat·ing, re·ju·ve·nates

To restore to youthful vigor or appearance; make young again.

To restore to an original or new condition: rejuvenate an old sofa.

To stimulate (a stream) to renewed erosive activity, as by uplift of the land.

To develop youthful topographic features in (a previously leveled area).
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Postby Wasara » Mon Nov 01, 2004 1:59 pm

(spooky pic there,Wynken!)


revitalize


1. (v) restore strenght; "This food revitalized the patient"

2. (v) give new life or vigor to
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Postby Wynken21 » Mon Nov 01, 2004 3:01 pm

in·vig·or·ate ( P ) Pronunciation Key (n-vg-rt)
tr.v. in·vig·or·at·ed, in·vig·or·at·ing, in·vig·or·ates

To impart vigor, strength, or vitality to; animate

(Hey, you know me Wasara ;) Oh and I see you are now a ranger, the most sincere congratulations to you, friend )
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Postby Gwenneth_Eruwen » Mon Nov 01, 2004 6:01 pm

en·liv·en ( P ) Pronunciation Key (n-lvn)

tr.v. en·liv·ened, en·liv·en·ing, en·liv·ens

To make lively or spirited; animate

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Postby Idhren » Mon Nov 01, 2004 6:41 pm

Stimulate

1. trans. To prick, sting, afflict. Obs. rare1.

a1548 HALL Chron., Hen. VII, 57 Kyng Henry.. euer punched, stimulated and pricked with the scrupulous stynges of domesticall sedicion.



2. To rouse to action or exertion as by pricking or goading; to spur on; to incite (a person) to do something; to impart additional energy to (an activity, a process).

1619 HUTTON Follie's Anat. etc. D6, My..distemperd thoughts, Do stimulate proud Silla's Ire. a1700 EVELYN Diary 27 Feb. 1644-5, The 3 races of the Barbarie horses, that run..without riders, onely having spurrs so placed on their backs,..as by their motion to stimulate them. 1759 HUME Hist. Eng., Hen. VIII, iii. I. 147 Hearing of the pope's captivity, they were farther stimulated to undertake the war with vigour for the restoring his liberty. 1768-74 TUCKER Lt. Nat. (1834) II. 526 The pricks of conscience will not so much afflict and torment us, as stimulate our resolution and excite our diligence. 1817 JAS. MILL Brit. India V. ix. II. 694 They..stimulated and importuned him, to bring forward a scheme of improvement. 1832 H. MARTINEAU Hill & Valley v. 77 To stimulate production by useful..labour. 1836 DICKENS Sk. Boz, Black Veil, To..stimulate him to fresh exertions. 1842 LEVER J. Hinton xviii, You have stimulated my curiosity. 1863 GEO. ELIOT Romola II. xxii, They..stimulated their prisoners to beg.



absol. 1789 J. MOORE Zeluco lxviii. (1797) II. 188 Contemptuous language may stimulate to..revenge. 1815 JANE AUSTEN Emma v, Where Miss Taylor failed to stimulate,..Harriet Smith will do nothing.



3. Phys. To act as a stimulus to (see STIMULUS 1, 3). a. To excite (an organ) to increased activity, to quicken the action or function of. Also with the action or function as obj.

1707 FLOYER Physic. Pulse-Watch 201 In general we use Medicines of the same Taste, as the secreted Humours, to stimulate their Excretion. 1798 R. JACKSON Hist. & Cure Fever 260 Wine, brandy and opium stimulate the system to increased action. 1809 Med. Jrnl. XXI. 103 Oxygen stimulates the pulmonic vessels, and..makes them propel their contents. 1843 R. J. GRAVES Syst. Clin. Med. xi. 119, I frequently prescribe small doses of hydrargyrum cum cretâ, with the view of gently stimulating the liver.



absol. 1662 J. DEGRAVERE Thesaurus Remediorum (ed. 2) 16 Signes indicating Purgation... A looseness or flux of humors stimulating to expulsion. 1732 ARBUTHNOT Rules of Diet in Aliments, etc. 261 Things which stimulate in the extreme Degree, excite pain. 1842 ABDY Water Cure 75 With bandages, put on tight to stimulate, upon the whole limb.



b. To excite (a tissue or structure) to its specific activity.

1878 ROY in Jrnl. Physiol. I. 475 When the muscle was stimulated directly by the induced current.



4. To administer stimulants to.

1905 Brit. Med. Jrnl. No. 2317. 1139 No one familiar with infectious diseases would systematically stimulate all cases.



b. intr. for refl. To indulge in (alcoholic) stimulants. Now only colloq. (? U.S.) Also in pass., To be affected by alcoholic drinks.

1800 Med. Jrnl. III. 50 Men of strong constitutions began to stimulate in excess very early in life. 1839 MARRYAT Diary Amer. Ser. I. II. 224 [Examples of American language.] He stimulates too much. 1882 O'DONOVAN Merv Oasis I. 449 A servant brought in a silver tray, upon which were large glasses of..arrack... We were all slightly stimulated before a move was made towards the dinner table. 1898 TALMAGE Serm. in Chr. Herald (N.Y.) 30 Mar. 268/4 Now he must brace himself up. Now he stimulates.



Hence stimulated people. a.

1887 J. S. BURDON-SANDERSON, etc. Transl. For. Biol. Mem. I. 255 The tract of nerve lying between the stimulating electrodes I call the stimulated region. Ibid. 273 Electrical phenomena in stimulated nerves. 1900 W. S. HALL Text-bk. Physiol. 52 The action of stimuli is..transient, i.e. the stimulated organism returns..to its former state of rest.

OED
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Postby Orangeblossom_Bumbleroot » Mon Nov 01, 2004 8:23 pm

com·move ( P ) Pronunciation Key (k-mv)
tr.v. com·moved, com·mov·ing, com·moves
To cause to move with force or violence; agitate; disturb.
To rouse strong feelings in; excite.


[Middle English commeven, from Old French commovoir, commeuv-, from Latin commovre. See commotion.]
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Postby Wasara » Tue Nov 02, 2004 5:42 am

charge up



1. (v) cause to be agitated,excited or roused; "The speaker charged up the crowd with his inflammatory remarks"
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Postby Idhren » Tue Nov 02, 2004 3:57 pm

Rouse

I. 1. refl. a. Of a hawk: To shake the feathers. Obs. rare. Cf. sense 9.

1486 Bk. St. Albans Avi, And whanne she hathe doone she will rowse hire myghtyly. [1825 SCOTT Betrothed xxiii, The..vigour with which they pruned their plumes, and shook, or, as it was technically termed, roused themselves.]



b. (See quot.) Obs. rare.

1530 PALSGR. 694/2, I rowse, I stretche my selfe, as a man dothe whan he gothe to prove a maystrye, je me coppie. It was a sporte to se him rowse him selfe and stretche out his armes, or ever he began to wrestyll.



2. trans. To cause (game) to rise or issue from cover or lair. Cf. RAISE v.1 4b.

1531 ELYOT Gov. I. xviii, If they wold use but a fewe nombre of houndes, onely to harborowe, or rouse, the game. 1575 TURBERV. Venerie 106 The huntesman..shall then go before them and rowze the Deare. 1596 SHAKES. 1 Hen. IV, I. iii. 198 The blood more stirres To rowze a Lyon, then to start a Hare. 1627 TAYLOR (Water P.) Armado Wks. (1630) I. 93 So hath this Woodmanship diuers and sundry tearmes of Art..as you must say, Rowse a Bucke, Start a Hare, and vnkennel a Foxe. 1697 DRYDEN Virg. Georg. III. 624 Thou mayst..Rouze from their Desart Dens, the bristled Rage Of Boars. 1709 PRIOR Henry & Emma 397 To beat the woods, and rouse the bounding prey. 1774 GOLDSM. Nat. Hist. (1776) III. 121 The chief huntsman, entering with his hounds within the lines, rouzed the game with a full cry. 1831 SCOTT Cast. Dang. vi, He proposes to go to rouse the wild cattle. 1858 KINGSLEY Poems 160 They roused a hart,..A hart of ten.



fig. 1589 GREENE Menaphon (Arb.) 15 When they want certaine liquid sacrifice, to rouze her [the muse] foorth her denne. 1593 SHAKES. Rich. II, II. iii. 128 To rowze his Wrongs, and chase them to the bay.



3. a. To raise or set up, to ruffle. Obs.

1590 SPENSER F.Q. I. xi. 9 An Eagle, seeing pray appeare, His aery plumes doth rouze. Ibid. II. iii. 35 He.., standing stoutly up, his lofty crest Did fiercely shake, and rowze as comming late from rest. 1604 DRAYTON Owle 732 As he stands proudly rowzing up his Plumes.



b. To raise or lift up. Also fig. Obs.

1597 SHAKES. 2 Hen. IV, IV. i. 118 Henry Bullingbrooke and hee Being mounted, and both rowsed in their Seates. 1633 P. FLETCHER Purple Isl. XI. xxix, She strives..to..rouze her fainting head, which down as oft would fall. 1650 EARL OF MONMOUTH tr. Senault's Man bec. Guilty 310 When he heard the comfort of birds or the noyse of the waters he rowsed up his soul to his Creator.



refl. 1599 SHAKES. Hen. V, I. ii. 275, I will..shew my sayle of Greatnesse, When I do rowse me in my Throne of France.



4. To cause to start up from slumber or repose; to awaken from sleep, meditation, etc. Also with up, out.

1593 SHAKES. Rich. II, I. iii. 134 Rouz'd vp with boystrous vntun'd drummes. 1601 Twel. N. II. iii. 60 Shall wee rowze the night-Owle in a Catch? 1632 MILTON L'Allegro 54 The Hounds and horn Chearly rouse the slumbring morn. 1711 ADDISON Spect. No. 55 1 A young Fellow who was rouzed out of his Bed, in order to be sent upon a long Voyage. 1757 W. WILKIE Epigoniad VII. 231 The stars descend; and soon the morning ray Shall rouse us to the labors of the day. 1819 SHELLEY Cenci IV. iv. 18, I must rouse him from his sleep, Since none else dare. 1853 KINGSLEY Hypatia xxviii, At last a low whistle roused her from her dream. 1896 BADEN-POWELL Matabele Campaign iii, Here I roused out Pyke, the officer in command. Ibid. xvi, At 2.30 we were roused up.



absol. 1846 TRENCH Mirac. xiv. (1862) 244 Christ rouses from the bier as easily as another would rouse from the bed.



b. To disturb, chase away (sleep). rare.

1667 MILTON P.L. III. 329 The cited dead Of all past Ages to the general Doom shall hast'n, such a peal shall rouse thir sleep.



5. fig. a. To awaken or startle (one) from a state of ease or security.

1594 T. B. La Primaud. Fr. Acad. II. 577 Although some men..fall sometimes into this senslesnesse, yet..God afterwards rowseth them vp well enough. 1627 DRAYTON Agincourt 100 And in vpon Northumberland doth breake, Rowzing the Sluggish villages from sleepe. 1650 T. HUBBERT Pill Formality 90 It rowsed him out of his security. a1740 WATERLAND Serm. xxxiii. Wks. 1823 IX. 412 His present fears, rather than any thing of true penitence, roused him up, and made him have recourse to God. 1770 PITT in Almon Anecd. (1810) II. xxxix. 194, I mean to rouse, to alarm the whole nationto rouse the Ministry, if possible, who seem awake to nothing but the preservation of their places.



b. To stir up, excite to vigorous action or thought, to provoke to activity.

c1586 C'TESS PEMBROKE Ps. LV. iv, Purple morn,..and midday cleare, Shall see my praying voice to God enclin'd, Rowzing him up. 1612 T. TAYLOR Comm. Titus i. 16 When the holy Ghost would rowse vp the slothfull seruant, he threateneth him his portion with hypocrites. 1678 R. L'ESTRANGE Seneca's Mor. (1702) 120 Philosophy..rouzes, us where we are faint and drouzy. 1710 STEELE Tatler No. 2 2 The Emperor is rouzed by this Alarm. 1777 WATSON Philip II (1793) II. XIII. 173 The Spaniards, rouzed by the danger which threatened them,..made a bold and vigorous resistance. 1808 Med. Jrnl. XIX. 161 Emetics..I thought might rouse the liver from its state of torpor. 1860 TYNDALL Glac. I. xxvii. 197 Vainly the postilion endeavoured to rouse them [sc. horses] by word and whip. 1888 BRYCE Amer. Commw. II. 413 To excite the voters by..the sense of a common purpose, rousing them by speeches or literature.



c. Const. to or into.

1701 DE FOE Trueborn Eng. 45 Till Pity rowz'd him from his soft Repose, His Life to unseen Hazards to expose. 1715 POPE Iliad II. 94 Unite, and rouze the sons of Greece to arms. 1743 R. BLAIR Grave 319 Enough to rouse a dead man into rage. 1831 SIR J. SINCLAIR Corr. II. 181 They roused the population to action, and armed them. 1847 MARTIN Ox 130/2 The animal is roused to fury. 1863 GEO. ELIOT Romola vi, His pride was roused to double activity.



d. To provoke to anger.

1843 P. Parley's Ann. IV. 355 He felt a delight..in plaguing the nursemaid, and in rousing the cook.



6. refl. in senses 4 and 5.

1590 LODGE Rosalynde (Hunterian Cl.) 85 With that his Brother began to stirre, and the Lion to rowse himselfe. 1606 SHAKES. Tr. & Cr. III. iii. 222 Sweete, rouse your selfe; and the weake wanton Cupid Shall from your necke vnloose his amorous fould. 1656 SANDERSON Serm. (1689) 141 Rowzing up himself and his spirits with zeal as hot as fire. 1726 SWIFT Gulliver IV. ii, I roused myself, and looked about me in the Room where I was left alone. 1794 MRS. RADCLIFFE Myst. Udolpho iv, He seemed by an effort to rouse himself. 1842 TENNYSON Ld. of Burleigh 21 From deep thought himself he rouses.



b. Const. to.

1587 GOLDING De Mornay Pref. (1592) p. vi, That reason rowseth up her selfe to rest vpon trueth. 1606 SHAKES. Ant. & Cl. V. ii. 287, I see him rowse himselfe To praise my Noble Act. 1693 OWEN Holy Spirit 114 Let such Souls rouze up themselves to lay hold on him. 1746 P. FRANCIS tr. Horace, Epist. I. ii. 48 Will you not rouse you to preserve yourself? 1848 DICKENS Dombey xxxii, The Captain..roused himself to a sustained consciousness of that gentleman's presence. 1880 MRS. FORRESTER Roy & V. I. 2 He too rouses himself to acknowledge the general homage.



7. To stir up, agitate, put into motion, bring into an active state.

1582 STANYHURST Æneis II. (Arb.) 50 Thee water is rowsed, they doe frisk with flownse to the shoare ward. 1667 MILTON P.L. II. 287 The sound of blustring winds, which all night long Had rous'd the Sea. 1728 T. SHERIDAN tr. Persius vi. (1739) 84 In rouzing the Strings of the Lyre. 1785 BURNS Ep. to Rev. J. M‘Math 11 Lest they shou'd blame her, An' rouse their holy thunder on it. 1810 Sporting Mag. XXXVI. 277 All the charges which they and the prosecutor had roused up against him. 1836 Backwoods of Canada 79 The landlady..led me to a blazing fire, which her damsels quickly roused up.



b. To stir up, excite, inflame (a feeling).

1589 GREENE Menaphon (Arb.) 68 He began thus to rowze vp his furie. 1637 HEYLIN Answ. Burton 184 You call upon the nobles to rowze up their noble Christian zeale. 1666 DRYDEN Ann. Mirab. cxc, But sharp remembrance..And shame..Rouse conscious virtue up in every heart. 1752 HUME Ess. & Treat. (1777) I. 12 The spirit of the people must frequently be rouzed. 1777 ROBERTSON Hist. Amer. II. (1778) I. 116 Those unprovoked injuries rouzed their courage. 1841 ELPHINSTONE Hist. Ind. II. 605 This crime only roused the indignation of the Marattas, without weakening their power. 1875 JOWETT Plato (ed. 2) IV. 156 The passions of religious parties have been roused to the utmost.



c. To stir (a liquid, esp. beer while brewing).

1823 J. BADCOCK Dom. Amusem. 101 Having poured boiling water on the suspected sample, rouse it well. 1839 URE Dict. Arts 118 Rouse the beer as the hops are gradually introduced. 1876 Encycl. Brit. IV. 275/2 This is done by ‘rousing’ the gyle every two hours with a utensil made for the purpose.



8. Naut. To haul in, out, or up with force.

c1625 Nomenclator Navalis (MS.), Rowse in is a worde theie use particulerlie when as a Cabell or Hawser doth lie slack in the water and they would have him made tawght. Ibid., To keepe it [the cable] stiff and tawght, they will hale in soe much as lies slack, and this they call Rowsing-in the Cabell or Rowse-in the Hawser. [Hence in various 17th cent. nautical works.] 1769 FALCONER Dict. Marine (1780), Recouvrer, to rowse-in, or haul any rope into the ship. 1832 MARRYAT N. Forster v, You and the boy, rouse the cable up.., and bend it. 1841 R. H. DANA Seaman's Man. xv. 85 Rouse the cable out through the hawse-hole. 1886 J. M. CAULFEILD Seamanship Notes 3 Rouse out reef pendant.



transf. 1890 ‘R. BOLDREWOOD’ Col. Reformer (1891) 193 You cut a straight sapling while we rouse out the saddle-straps for a splice.



II. intr.

9. Of hawks or other birds and animals: To shake the feathers or body. Obs.

1486 Bk. St. Albans Cviij, She Rousith when she shakith all hir federis. 1575 TURBERV. Faulconrie 149 Then suffer hir until she rowse or mewte, and when she hath done either of them unhoode hir. 1639 T. DE LA GREY Compl. Horsem. 216 You shall perceive him either to shake his head, or to winch with his tayle, to rouze, or shake. 1657 R. LIGON Barbadoes (1673) 4 The Turtles..there, mute, prune, and oyl their feathers; rouse, and doe all their offices of nature. 1678 PHILLIPS, Rowze, in Faulconry is when a Hawk lifteth up, and shaketh her self.



10. Of game: To rise from cover. rare.

1575 TURBERV. Venerie 106 All the horsemen must quickly cast abrode about the couert, to discouer ye Harte when he rowzeth and goeth out of his hold. 1590 SIR T. COCKAINE Treat. Hunting Civb, This done, you may begin to tuft for a Bucke, and finding him single, especially if he rouse foorth of a great brake, put your hounds softly upon. 1826 HONE Every-day Bk. II. 1031 A red buck roused, then crossed in view.



11. To move with violence; to rush. rare.

1582 STANYHURST Æneis I. (Arb.) 19 A king he placed, throgh whose Maiestical Empyre Theese blasts rouze forward, or back by his regal apoinctment. 1818 Sporting Mag. II. 279 The Paddington boy..tried again to rouse in upon Doly's victualling-office.



12. To rise up, stand on end. Obs.1

1605 SHAKES. Macb. V. v. 12 My Fell of haire Would at a dismall Treatise rowze, and stirre As life were in't.



13. To get up from sleep or repose; to waken up.

1605 SHAKES. Macb. III. ii. 52 Good things of Day begin to droope, and drowse, Whiles Nights black Agents to their Prey's doe rowse. 1642 MILTON Apol. Smect. Wks. 1851 III. 266 Up, and stirring..with the Bird that first rouses. 1682 CREECH Lucretius (1683) 131 And softer Curs, that lie and sleep at home, Do often rouse, and walk about the Room. 1707 J. STEVENS tr. Quevedo's Com. Wks. (1709) 229 Day came, and we all rouz'd. 1719 DE FOE Crusoe II. (Globe) 488 Rouzing..from Sleep with the Noise, I caus'd the Boat to be thrust in. 1882 FLOYER Unexpl. Baluchistan 99, I gradually roused up on hearing this, and..put my head out of the tent door. 1890 Illustr. Lond. News 13 Dec. 746/1 When I roused, the yellow sun was pouring in at my lattice.



b. fig. To become active; to bestir oneself, take heart or courage, etc.

1589 L. WRIGHT Hunting of Antichrist 13 Shortly after began to rowse our noble and valiant Lion of England, Henrie the eight of famous memorie. 1611 SPEED Hist. Gt. Brit. VII. xxxvi. (1623) 386 Hubba that had harried the English, and now rouzed upon the newes of King Elfred's victory and life. 1624 QUARLES Job Militant xix. 6 Rouze up, fond man, and answere my replies. 1740 Johnson's Debates (1787) I. 91 It is surely time for this nation to rouse from indolence, and to resolve to put an end to frauds that have been so long known. 1791 COWPER Iliad IV. 498 Be it ours to rouse at once To action. 1831 SCOTT Cast. Dang. xiii, In God's name, rouse up, sir; let it not be said that [etc.].



c. Of qualities or feelings.

1671 MILTON Samson 1690 His fierie vertue rouz'd From under ashes into sudden flame. 1759 ADAM SMITH Moral Sent. (1804) I. 181 Our indignation rouses and we are eager to refute..such detestable principles. 1850 THACKERAY Pendennis lxxi, Arthur..felt his anger rousing up within him.

1. trans. To sprinkle (herring, etc.) with salt in the process of curing.

17.. in Lauder's Suppl. Decis. Lds. Council IV. 845 His charter not mentioning that it was for export, he was not bound to rouse them with salt upon salt. 1800 Chron., Ann. Reg. 110/2 Herrings sprinkled (or as it is termed ‘roused or corned’) with a moderate quantity of salt will continue perfectly good at least two months. 1854 H. MILLER Sch. & Schm. (1858) 43 We could see..the curers going about rousing their fish with salt, to counteract the effects of the dog-day sun. 1894 R. LEIGHTON Wreck Golden Fleece 57 While I go below and roose the fish.



2. To cause (water) to overflow (see quot.).

1794 DAVIS Agric. Wilts 38 In the catch-meadows..the great object is to keep the ‘works of them’ as dry as possible between the intervals of watering;..care is necessary to make the most of the water by catching and rousing it as often as possible.

? To rest, settle.

1563 FOXE A. & M. 1393/2, I was caryed to my Lordes Colehouse agayne, where I with my syxe fellowes do rouse together in the straw, as cherefullye..as other doo in theyr beds of downe. 1616 Rich Cabinet 153 The maister of the house began to rouse his shoulders in a rich chaire.

intr. To scold. Freq. const. at, on, onto: to upbraid (someone). Hence rousing vbl. n.3

c1910 in G. A. WILKES Dict. Austral. Colloquialisms (1978) 279/2 Rouse, abuse or vilify. 1911 L. STONE Jonah v. 47 It's gittin' late; 'ow'll yer ole woman rous w'en yer git 'ome? Ibid. xi. 126 'E niver rouses on me. W'en 'e gits shirty, I just laugh, an' 'e can't keep it up. 1915 C. J. DENNIS Songs of Sentimental Bloke 88 If she 'ad only roused I might 'a' smiled. She jist seems 'urt an' crushed; not even riled. 1934 V. PALMER Sea & Spinifex 182 Combo's one of those sulky devils that forget nothing... Can't take a bit of rousing as part of the day's work. 1940 F. SARGESON Man & his Wife 27 Then Mrs Bowman roused on to me for putting too much sugar in her tea. 1951 D. CUSACK Say No to Death 30 Auntie used to rouse on me frightfully because I spent so much time on the beach. 1961 R. LAWLER Piccadilly Bushman 31 Don't rouse at me, Alec

1. A shake (of the feathers, etc.). Obs.

1589 PUTTENHAM Eng. Poesie III. xxiii. (Arb.) 272 These fowles in their moulting time, when their feathers be sick, and be so loase in the flesh that at any little rowse they can easilie shake them off. 1600 BRETON Melanch. Humours Wks. (Grosart) I. 14/1 But all in feare to make so farre a flight, Vntill his pennes were somewhat harder growne; He gaue a rowse. 1614 LATHAM Falconry (1633) 53 If her stomacke..be cold and dull, she will flie wilde and carelesly, and on plains and rowses. 1672 J. JOSSELYN New Englands Rarities 17 The Porcupine.., a very angry Creature and dangerous, shooting a whole shower of Quills with a rowse at their enemies.



2. Mil. The signal for arousing; the réveille.

1802 JAMES Milit. Dict., Rouse, one of the bugle-horn soundings for duty. 1821 J. BAILLIE Metr. Leg., Wallace xxxvii, No more again the rouse of war to hear. 1863 Cornh. Mag. VII. 446 The first notes of the rouse are dismal,..but they are succeeded by a few others of an encouraging and lively character. 1894 WOLSELEY Marlborough II. 198 When the ‘rouse’ had sounded that morning.



3. A violent stir. Also rouse-out.

1824 W. IRVING T. Trav. I. 61 He revolutionized the whole establishment, and gave it such a rouse that the very house reeled with it. 1881 C. A. STEPHENS Knockabout Club in Woods (1882) xi. 122 The result was a most unwelcome rouse-out shortly after ten o'clock. 1916 C. SANDBURG Chicago Poems 125 The silk and flare of it [sc. a red scarf] is a great soprano leading a chorus Carried along in a rouse of voices reaching for the heart of the world.



4. attrib., as (sense 2) rouse-parade.

1937 D. JONES In Parenthesis I. 4 We've got too many bunsand all those wadsyou knew they were goingwhy did you order themthey won't be in after rouse~parade eventhey've gone.

1. A full draught of liquor; a bumper.

1602 SHAKES. Ham. I. ii. 126 And the Kings Rouce, the Heauens shall bruite againe. 1626 J. TAYLOR (Water P.) Trav. Wks. (1630) III. 80/2 Because death should not terrifie him, they had giuen him many rowses and carowses of wine and beere. 1640 H. GLAPTHORNE Wallenstein V. ii, My Lord,..take me off This lusty rowse to your owne health.



1820 SHELLEY Let. to Maria Gisborne 65 Then all quaff Another rouse, and hold their sides and laugh.



2. A carousal or bout of drinking.

1602 SHAKES. Ham. II. i. 58 There was he gaming, there o'retooke in's Rouse. 1619 FLETCHER Mons. Thomas I. ii, She has heard..The gambols that you plaid.., your several mischiefs, Your rowses and your wenches. 1654 GAYTON Pleas. Notes IV. viii. 217 After a good rouze, or good dose of Nepenthe, they are in a trance.



1855 KINGSLEY Westw. Ho! viii, Amyas..invited..his old schoolfellows..to a merry supper and a ‘rowse’ thereon consequent. 1863 COWDEN CLARKE Shaks. Char. v. 131 It was natural that a free, open-hearted soldier should welcome the arrival of his brother-officers with a rouse.



3. In the phrases to take one's rouse, have a rouse, give a rouse.

(a) 1602 SHAKES. Ham. I. iv. 8 The King doth wake to night, and takes his rouse. 1616 Marlowe's Faustus (Rtldg.) 122/2 He took his rouse with stoops of Rhenish wine. 1623 MASSINGER Dk. Milan I. i, Your lord, by his patent, Stands bound to take his rouse.



(b) 1609 B. JONSON Sil. Wom. III. vi, We will haue a rouse in each of 'hem, anon, for bold Britons, yfaith. 1667 DAVENANT & DRYDEN Tempest IV. iii, I long to have a rouse to her grace's health. 1815 SCOTT Guy M. xxxiv, Rambling up and down this dd vault, and thinking about the merry rouses we have had in it. 1842 TENNYSON Vision of Sin IV. ix, Fill the cup, and fill the can: Have a rouse before the morn. 1864 BURTON Scot Abr. II. 181 Patrick's neighbour,..with whom..he has a merry rouse.



(c) 1604 SHAKES. Oth. II. iii. 66 'Fore heauen, they haue giuen me a rowse already. 1609 HEALEY Discov. New World 84 Giue me one rouse, my freind, and get thee gone. 1842 BROWNING Cavalier Tunes II. i, Give a rouse: here's, in Hell's despite now, King Charles!

Oxford English Dictionary
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Postby Wasara » Wed Nov 03, 2004 5:04 am

bestir



1. (v) become active; "He finally bestirred him"
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Postby Idhren » Wed Nov 03, 2004 6:36 pm

Entice
1. trans. To stir up, incite, instigate (to a course of action); also to provoke (to anger). Obs.

1297 R. GLOUC. (1724) 235 Edelfred..He entyced and oer kynges..at hii wende to Walys. c1315 SHOREHAM 114 Glotonye entythyth [? read entychyth, entyssyth; rime norysseth] To lecherye her. c1325 E.E. Allit. P. B. 1136 ou drytyn dyspleses with dedes ful sore, & entyses hym to tene more trayly en euer. ?a1400 Chester Pl. (1843-7) 207 When he intisced hym through his read. ?a1400 Morte Arth. 307 To entyce the Emperour to take overe the mounttes. 1538 BALE Thre Lawes 1998 Therein to do as ye shall me entyce. 1568 GRAFTON Chron. II. 720 Your maister, is..entised and provoked by the Duke of Burgoyn. 1628 HOBBES Thucyd. (1822) 62 Not suffering the Athenians to give them the least way but enticing them to the war.



2. To allure, attract by the offer of pleasure or advantage; esp. to allure insidiously or adroitly. Often const. from, to (a course of conduct, a place). Also with away, in.

1303 R. BRUNNE Handl. Synne 1503 yf ou..entycedest any fro relygyoun, Gostly ou mayst hym slo. 1401 Pol. Poems (1859) II. 33 What charity is this..to intice him to be buried among you from his parish church. 1550 Act 3 & 4 Edw. VI, c. 16 §13 If..the father..steale, or intise away any such child. 1577 B. GOOGE Heresbach's Husb. IV. (1586) 187 [Bees]..entised with these newe flowres..feed..greedilie. 1607 DEKKER Westw. Hoe Wks. 1873 II. 306 Intist from mine owne Paradice, To steale fruit in a barren wildernes. 1648 GAGE West. Ind. xix. (1655) 144 Those that keep the Bodegones..will commonly intice in the Indians, and make them drunk. 1664 EVELYN Kal. Hort. (1729) 209 Beer mingled with Honey, to entice the Wasps. 1706 ADDISON Rosamond III. iii, That no foul minister of vice Again my sinking soul intice. 1748 Anson's Voy. III. vi. 348 We could not entice them on board. 1786 H. TOOKE Purley Introd. 6, I shall not be at all inticed by them to take upon my shoulders a burthen. 1807 CRABBE Par. Reg. III. (1810) 31 No curious shell, rare plant..Inticed our traveller, from his home, so far. 1872 BLACK Adv. Phaeton xxv. 343 My Lady strove to entice him into the general talk. 1880 T. A. SPALDING Eliz. Demonol. 22 The most successful method of enticing stragglers into its folds.



b. transf. To attract physically. nonce-use.

1646 SIR T. BROWNE Pseud. Ep. II. iii. 76 It would not intice it [the Needle] from A to B, but repell it from A to Z.



3. [? A distinct word, a. OF. entechier: see ENTACH.] ? To catch (an infection or stain). Obs.

c1340 Gaw. & Gr. Knt. 3436 How tender hit is to entyse teches of fyle.



Hence enticeable a., Obs., in 7 intiseable, fitted to entice, seductive. enticeful a., Obs. rare, enticing, full of enticement.

1607 Exam. Geo. Blakwel 156 Intiseable perswasions of mens alluring reasons. 1556 T. HOBY tr. Castiglione's Courtyer II. (1561) Lb, Women enticefull past shame.

Oxford English Dictionary
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Postby Wasara » Thu Nov 04, 2004 5:43 am

tweedle


1. (v) entice through the use of music

2. (v) play negligently on a musical instrument

3. (v) sing in modulation
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Postby Idhren » Thu Nov 04, 2004 1:44 pm

Twitter
Main Entry: 1twit·ter
Pronunciation: 'twi-t&r
Function: verb
Etymology: Middle English twiteren; akin to Old High German zwizzirOn to twitter
intransitive senses
1 : to utter successive chirping noises
2 a : to talk in a chattering fashion b : GIGGLE, TITTER
3 : to tremble with agitation : FLUTTER
transitive senses
1 : to utter in chirps or twitters <the robin twittered its morning song>
2 : to shake rapidly back and forth : FLUTTER
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Postby Wasara » Thu Nov 04, 2004 2:07 pm

chitter


1. (v) make high-pitched sounds, as of birds
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