Water issues

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Water issues

Postby Cerin » Fri Aug 01, 2014 10:37 am

There was a recent study that showed an alarming rate of depletion of the groundwater in the Colorado River basin, which supplies several of the western states, including California (I will look for that link, and will add it to the post). Groundwater takes years and years to accumulate, and that area is in its 15th year of drought. The article below notes that Nestle continues to bottle vast amounts of water from that area and sell it for profit, and also notes the enormous amounts of water used to maintain golf courses, and for fracking. It seems to me we had better prioritize before it is too late.

Nestlé has two plants on the Colorado River Basin that take in water to bottle and sell under its Arrowhead and Pure Life brands. One is in Salida, Colorado, on the eastern edge of the Upper Basin; the other is in the San Gorgonio Pass, halfway between San Bernardino and Indio, Calif., on the western edge of the Lower Basin. According to annual reports filed up to 2009, Nestlé bottles between 595 and 1,366 acre-feet of water per year – enough to flood that many acres under a foot of water – from the California source. The company takes 200 additional acre-feet per year from the Colorado source. This means altogether Nestlé is draining the Colorado River Basin of anywhere from 250 million to 510 million gallons of water per year, according to the acre-feet-to-gallons conversion calculator.

The Colorado River Basin is an especially critical water resource, responsible for supplying municipal water to 40 million Americans and irrigating 5.5 million acres of land. As the US Bureau of Reclamation has documented, 22 federally-recognized tribes, seven national wildlife refuges, four national recreation areas, and 11 national parks depend on the basin. In a new report by NASA and the University of California at Irvine, researchers discovered that between December of 2004 and November of 2013, the basin lost 53 million acre-feet of water. 41 million acre-feet, or 75 percent of that loss, came from groundwater sources, like those pumped by Nestlé. That’s more than twice the amount of water contained in Lake Mead, America’s largest freshwater reservoir. In the meantime, Nestlé, with 29 water bottling facilities across North America, pocketed $4 billion in revenue from bottled water sales in 2012 alone.

But Nestlé isn’t alone in abusing the main water source of the Western United States. Expansive golf courses in desert areas, like those in Arizona and Southern California, require hundreds of thousands of gallons of water per day to maintain. According to the United States Golf Association (USGA), 2 million acres of American golf courses are irrigated, or 80 percent of the country's total golf course acreage.Between 2003 and 2005, the USGA estimated that 2,312,701 acre-feet of water was used to maintain golf courses, amounting to over 2 billion gallons of water per day. An NPR report from 2008 put that in perspective, comparing the average daily water usage of one golf course to the amount of water used by one American family over the course of 4 years.

An “Insurmountable” Water Crisis by 2040

Egregious abuses of limited freshwater supplies have led to panic from some and greed from others. If current drought conditions and water usage patterns persist, it’s estimated that the world will face an “insurmountable” water crisis by 2040. Aarhaus University of Denmark, the Vermont Law School and the nonprofit CNA Corporation recently released a study showing that a global population increase compounded by an exponential increase in water consumption will inevitably lead to drastic drought conditions unless immediate action is taken. The study projected a 40 percent gap between water supply and demand by 2030 under current conditions.

According to the study, 41 percent of American freshwater consumption came from energy production alone. Energy sources like nuclear and coal power were responsible for the bulk of water consumption, though the process of hydraulic fracturing – better known as fracking, where jets of water mixed with chemicals are blasted underground to break up shale formations that produce natural gas – was also high on the list. A prime example is Texas, where the population is expected to skyrocket from 25 million to 55 million in the next 35 years. Texas currently draws 91 percent of its electricity from natural gas, nuclear and coal power. And in the summer of 2011, Texas experienced its worst drought in history.

Outdoing Texas, California is now facing its worst drought in 1,200 years. Latest numbers from the National Drought Mitigation Center show that 80 percent of California is in “extreme drought.” A full 31 percent of California is experiencing “exceptional drought” conditions, including population centers like Los Angeles, Oakland, and San Francisco. Food prices have gone up by an average of 2.5 percent since last year, and are expected to increase by another 3.5 percent before year's end. No less than 85 percent of the lettuce Americans eat comes from drought-ravaged California. Fresh fruits and vegetable prices are projected to increase by 6 percent in the coming months as a result of the drought.

Constitutionally-Protected Corporate Greed

The research community isn’t the only group of people paying attention to the writing on the wall. Corporate executives are quickly making moves to privatize water resources, declaring the resource to be the next oil. Peter Brabeck, chairman and former CEO of Nestlé, has openly said that "access to water is not a public right." This is in spite of UN Resolution 64/292, which declares that water and sanitation are both basic human rights. The World Health Organization has said that one person needs 20 liters of water for “survival” levels of use, including bathing and laundry. As I wrote previously for Occupy.com, the France-based Suez company is using a New Jersey-based subsidiary to prepare a buyout of Detroit’s water infrastructure, with a potential end goal of privatizing the Detroit River and the Great Lakes.

Researchers argue for greater regulation of water usage to prevent future global drought, though that becomes complicated when looking into how such regulations would be implemented and enforced. The US Bureau of Reclamation monitors surface water, but groundwater regulation is up to individual states. And in the Colorado River Basin, for example, California has no regulations on groundwater usage despite the Bay Area implementing strict new penalties for excessive use of water. Even if federal or state agencies wanted to intervene to stop corporate entities like golf courses, power companies or Nestlé from using up precious groundwater resources, corporations and their profits are protected under the constitution, giving them the same rights as actual human beings.

Ever since the Supreme Court established that corporations are legally people in the Santa Clara County v. Southern Pacific Railroad ruling of 1886, corporations have successfully overridden a slew of regulations citing the equal protection clause under the 14th Amendment. By proving that a certain regulation would unduly infringe on a corporation’s ability to make a profit, well-heeled corporate entities have lawyered up to defy regulatory agencies for over a century. The Buckley v. Valeo ruling in 1976 further ensconced corporate personhood, and the Citizens United v. FEC ruling in January of 2010 established the precedent that because corporations have the same legal rights as a person, their money is considered free speech. So not only can corporations defy any new regulation on their future usage of precious water resources, but they can spend unlimited amounts of money in election cycles to elect politicians who will prioritize their right to make a profit over a citizen’s right to have access to water.

As long as corporations are given the same constitutional protections as people, they’ll always escape regulation and accountability for their actions. Simply "getting money out of politics" is not enough – only a constitutional amendment that explicitly abolishes the concept of corporate personhood and separates money from free speech will guarantee that necessary actions can be taken to prevent a disastrous water shortage.


http://www.nationofchange.org/how-corporations-are-creating-life-threatening-water-shortage-1406899785

edit to fix link
Last edited by Cerin on Tue Sep 30, 2014 10:06 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Water crisis in the Colorado Basin

Postby RoseMorninStar » Fri Aug 01, 2014 12:26 pm

Sobering. Upsetting. Frustrating. I am sick to death of 'Citizens United'.
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Re: Water crisis in the Colorado Basin

Postby portia » Sat Aug 02, 2014 8:39 am

I think that the courts are still reeling from Citizens United, and will shortly remember that the ability to make a profit is less important than people being allowed to have drinking water, or to make food crops grow. Not all corporate interests are the same. If homeowners and growers of crops have to cut back, there is no argument to support the idea that Water bottlers do not have to cut back.

Of course, some localities are going to have to recall that these areas are natural deserts, and trying to grow lush semi-tropical landscapes and large areas of grass is nonsense. We have had time of day and day of week restrictions on watering as long as I have lived here. It is entirely workable.

Several years ago, we were travelling through the ag belt in Central California every year. We always saw watering (with those big sprayers that shoot up into the sky) at NOON! If someone wants to get more water for his crops, he'd better use what he gets better.

Southern California has been in what other people call "drought" status more or less as long as I have lived here in Southern California (that is a while!). They overlook that such a state is natural, for us. One year, we got 35 inches of rain in the winter, and there was a lot of damage, flood loss and annoyance with the wet weather. Other people's ideas of a drought are not the same as ours.

Possibly, we need more input from people who have lived in the desert for about 10 years, and less input from people who battle floods every year. (Boy: would I like a flood!!!).

Yesterday, we were having threatening weather. I went to the store and when I got in line, it was hailing!! I was grinning like a fool, but it was beautiful. By the time I had to run through it, it was just a fairly hard rain, and by the time I got home, it had stopped, at my house. That is a problem with these Monsoonal thunderstorms: you get a lot of rain in a small area, and very little elsewhere. (Contrary to some opinion, I am not the Wicked Witch of the West and I will not melt).
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Re: Water crisis in the Colorado Basin

Postby Cerin » Thu Aug 07, 2014 9:30 am

A brief article about Nestle's water-bottling activities in Maine.
Nestlé Subsidiary Tries to Sell Small Town Its Own Water: Residents Fight Back

Perhaps you’ve yet to hear of a little town called Fryeburg, Maine, USA. It sits on its own pristine aquifer, but once Nestlé subsidiary Poland Spring moved to town, residents noticed that their streams were getting smaller. It turns out, in its continued efforts to privatize water, the company was pumping the aquifer, and then selling the water back to town residents in bottles. Freyburg is fighting back, though.

Nestlé has openly admitted that they don’t think water is a human right. Peter Brabeck-Letmathe, the Chairman and CEO of Nestlé, stated so openly in public, only to back-paddle later once activists accused him of being singularly interested in corporate profits and not water conservation, as he claimed. You can see him admit his true stance in this video.

When lakes and streams started to be depleted in Freyburg (that’s some water conservation, Nestlé) the residents spoke up, and the company then launched an aggressive, divide and conquer campaign.

Furthermore, Nestlé alsoset up a Poland Spring shop for outreach, and established the Fryeburg Business Association staffed by a Nestlé employee. What this corrupt company is trying to do is get people to accept this as the norm: water they have to pay a corporation for, even though it was abundant and free prior to Nestlé’s interference.The corp sued the town, almost bankrupting several water advocacy activists, and worked with the city board members to ensure their ongoing access to the town’s water. Nestlé took the case all the way to the Supreme Court when Freyburg wouldn’t just lay down and take it.

Activists have taken up a new plan to try to defeat Nestlé, launching an education campaign to try to get residents to reclaim their water rides and pride of ownership in what was already theirs before a corporate monopoly moved to town. They are passing out re-usable water bottles to Fryeburg residents stamped with the message, “we don’t want your bottled water!”

Activists have also set up a website, called StopNestleWaters.org, to help oust this greedy behemoth from their town. Freyburg has won suits brought against them five times (and appealed) by Nestlé. Nestlé’s lost all four (one is still pending), and in one instance, the company’s lawyers argued in front of the Maine Supreme Court that their right to grow market share superceded the town’s right of control. You can see a video of that here.

The citizen’s group trying to fight Nestlé; however, is now $20,000 in debt, trying to keep up with their constant legal attacks.

If you want to support the town of Freyburg and send Nestlé a very clear message before they come to your town trying to sell you back any remaining good water that is still around after fracking and weaponized-weather-induced drought, you can contribute here.



http://www.nationofchange.org/nestl-subsidiary-tries-sell-small-town-its-own-water-residents-fight-back-1407337457
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Re: Water crisis in the Colorado Basin

Postby Frelga » Thu Aug 07, 2014 9:58 am

Nestle is a corporate equivalent of a thug. If corporations are now people that have the right to free speech and religious freedom, it should also be possible to tar and feather one and run it out of town on a rail.
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Re: Water crisis in the Colorado Basin

Postby portia » Fri Aug 08, 2014 7:50 am

As one of the people who is directly affected by the drought (water issues and fires) I would prefer to concentrate on the real issues. But seeing that the
"anti Nestle" tirade has appeared again, I need to suggest that people keep their skepticism caps and treat this as a very slanted, emotionally charged article(s). A whole list of questions that the article raises, because of its slanted nature, ran through my mind last night, but I have other things much more important to do than the necessary research to see if the slanting amounts to lying.

Don't be taken in and do not panic.
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Re: Water crisis in the Colorado Basin

Postby Frelga » Fri Aug 08, 2014 8:57 am

I am not basing my comments on a single article. Nestle has done worse things for profit in the past.
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Re: Water crisis in the Colorado Basin

Postby Jnyusa » Sat Aug 09, 2014 12:32 pm

Killing thousands of babies in Nigeria, for example, by failing to provide new mothers with accurate information about their infant formula.

But there's also a drop-dead outcome if the situation evolves as the voracious arbitrageurs hope it will. People will not passively die of thirst when the only thing between them and the water is a land title. Civil wars ensue when a critical resource is sequestered by the few.

(Anthropologist Marvin Harris thinks the necessity of avoiding Water Wars is behind the Jewish & Moslem prohibition against pork.)
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Re: Water crisis in the Colorado Basin

Postby Cerin » Sat Aug 09, 2014 5:40 pm

portia wrote:As one of the people who is directly affected by the drought (water issues and fires) I would prefer to concentrate on the real issues. But seeing that the
"anti Nestle" tirade has appeared again, I need to suggest that people keep their skepticism caps and treat this as a very slanted, emotionally charged article(s). A whole list of questions that the article raises, because of its slanted nature, ran through my mind last night, but I have other things much more important to do than the necessary research to see if the slanting amounts to lying.

Don't be taken in and do not panic.

This is your typical reaction to articles with a viewpoint, yet you offer no substantive information to go along with your dismissal. You insinuate that because the article has a viewpoint, that the information it contains might be lies. This is a rather scurrilous tactic. You had the same reaction to the facts surrounding the effort to ruin and privatize the U.S. Postal Service. You dismissed the information because it was contained in an article with a viewpoint, but it was entirely accurate.

I would suggest you wait until you do have time to find some contrary evidence, before you start casting aspersions on other people's integrity.
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Re: Water crisis in the Colorado Basin

Postby portia » Sun Aug 10, 2014 6:43 pm

Oh, Indeed was it accurate?
I can't help but doubt articles that depend on emotional phrases and more or less obvious half truths. If the article is accurate, there is no reason it cannot use ordinary language, and citations to facts (I believe that Wikipedia makes pretty good use of this.) Truthful discussions do not need to whip the audience into a frenzy.

I have been the target of too many of these emotional arguments to take them at face value (well--full disclosure--I have also been the writer of quite a few). If it walks like a duck and quacks like a duck, I have the tendency to view it as a duck.

And the fact that I have had the same reaction to other articles makes no difference. These discussions are thick on the ground. It is hard to avoid them.
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Re: Water crisis in the Colorado Basin

Postby Cerin » Sun Aug 17, 2014 8:10 am

This is an interesting (imo) and informative article about Toledo's recent drinking water crisis (excerpt). I've never not been able to use my tap water; it's something I tend to take for granted.

Toledo residents had been told to not drink their water for over 2 days starting on August 3, after a swath of cyanobacteria collected right on top of the city’s water intake. Mistakenly referred to as “blue-green algae,” the cyanobacteria produces toxins that make water unsafe to drink, bathe in or even boil. Killing cyanobacteria prompts it to produce even more toxins, so the only real solution is to starve it of its food sources, largely from phosphorous runoff.


http://www.nationofchange.org/how-crony-capitalism-and-deregulation-poisoned-toledo-s-water-1408199701
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Re: Water crisis in the Colorado Basin

Postby portia » Sun Aug 17, 2014 5:28 pm

Yes; there is a lot of work to be done on water from the Great Lakes. A good example of trying to pretend that what goes in, doesn't come out again from a water source. However, some of that pollution dares back to when people didn't understand that the water source was not unlimited. I thin it is similar to Europe's pollution on the rivers, years ago. They didn't understand what they were doing.
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Re: Water crisis in the Colorado Basin

Postby solicitr » Mon Aug 18, 2014 7:41 am

Overuse of Colorado-basin water is a severe problem, has been for decades and is getting rapidly worse and worse.

But to launch the discussion with long screeds from an ultraleft "we hate corporations!" source is about as unhelpful as starting a discussion of the Gaza crisis with articles on the subject from Der Sturmer: everything is the fault of The Enemy whom we wish to destroy.

As an AZ desert rat I have been aware of this growing mess my whole life. The problem is, and always has been, far less one of "corporate greed" than that of too dang many people trying to live in a desert. The explosive population growth of metro areas like Las Vegas and Phoenix, with lush green lawns and swimming pools to boot, is the root of the problem, not horrible, awful, icky fracking or Acme Corp.
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Re: Water crisis in the Colorado Basin

Postby RoseMorninStar » Mon Aug 18, 2014 1:09 pm

This isn't a simple problem, and most likely there will not be a simple answer. Yes, I do think far too many people are trying to live in a desert (and yet, not 'live in the desert', ie: green lawns, golf courses, swimming pools in most yards, etc..) However, this reminds me a of a situation (on a much smaller scale) in the area in which I grew up. It was/is farm country and a large corporate farm bought a huge amount of acreage in the area. Because it was a large/corporate, they could afford to drill wells deeper than any of the other farmers and the small farms were outta luck. There was also a horse farm in the area, but the ground got so hard & dry the horses were going lame. We moved at about the time this was at issue, so I never did find out what the outcome was.

For me the water issue is the concern and *responsibility* of everyone, personal & corporate. However, do those with more money (who are making a large profit off of said resource) have more 'rights' than everyone else? Like I said, not a simple problem.
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Re: Water crisis in the Colorado Basin

Postby portia » Tue Aug 19, 2014 9:52 am

Solicitr comes closer to the core of the problem. "Sunset" had an article on someone's lush landscape and I was amazed. Of All publications, "Sunset" should have an idea that such water use is not a good idea.
California has reduced its water use/per customer, but the number of users has increased.

Unfortunately, the overall climate is so good, here, that people will continue to come, and then want to use water in the way they did before. We need some new solutions--sea water purification; more graywater use?

Water litigation has been a profitable area for a long time around here.

In the meantime, I have no lawn, I am putting off turning on my drip irrigation, and I had my weeds cut down this AM. But the weather is great (73 F with a nice breeze). A good tradeoff. :lol: :) :) :rofl:
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Re: Water crisis in the Colorado Basin

Postby Cerin » Mon Sep 01, 2014 4:24 pm

The California legislature has passed the first-ever plan to regulate groundwater. It still needs the Gov.'s signature.


California Makes Historic Move to Regulate Underground Water for the First Time
RYAN KORONOWSKI
CLIMATE PROGRESS


At least one in four Californians get their water from underground aquifers, and up until now, use of this water has been totally unregulated, with disputes about overuse settled in court. California is one of the few where it’s “pump as you please” with groundwater. That is about to change.

As the California State Legislature wrapped up their session, they passed the state’s first-ever plan to regulate underground water supplies. Urban Democrats, water district managers, and environmental advocates gave the measure enough support to pass it over the opposition of Republicans and farm-area legislators. The legislation now goes to Governor Jerry Brown for his signature.

Clean Water Action’s Jennifer Clary said, “the passage of the Sustainable Groundwater Management legislation takes an historic first step towards ensuring that our groundwater will remain a resource for future Californians.”

Three bills make up the groundwater regulatory plan: one tells local agencies to come up with water management programs, another establishes parameters for state intervention, and the third delays that intervention in areas where groundwater pumping has affected surface water. Some agricultural interests fear regulation of the groundwater reserves that many farmers have turned to in the midst of the worst drought in a generation. State Senator Fran Pavley, author of two of the bills, said she worked with farmers to draft them, gaining the support of the Community Alliance with Family Farmers.

“The state cannot manage water in California until we manage groundwater,” said Assembly Speaker Toni Atkins, D-San Diego. “You cannot have reliability with no plan to manage water.”

If you are eating a fruit, vegetable, or nut grown in the U.S., there’s an almost 50-50 chance that it came from California. At the same time, it’s the only western state that does not exercise some sort of control over its groundwater.

Groundwater has become even more crucial as surface water supplies have dwindled. In fact, according to a study released last week, while only 70 million acre-feet of water flow through the state during a good year, 370 million acre-feet worth of water rights have been given out in the last hundred years. Yet even adding groundwater supplies to the equation still leaves the state with a water deficit, according to a recent report from the Natural Resources Defense Council and the Pacific Institute.

In fact, the Central Valley is consuming twice as much groundwater as can be replaced through normal precipitation. The Valley is the center of gravity to the state’s $36.9 billion agricultural industry because it contains the world’s largest mass of ultra-fertile Class 1 soil.

“It’s our savings account, and we’re draining it,” Phil Isenberg of the Public Policy Institute of California, told the San Jose Mercury News. The former Sacramento mayor and assemblyman continued: “at some point, there will be none left.”

In a normal year for precipitation, California receives about 40 percent of its total water from under the ground — in a dry year, that jumps above 60 percent. It’s gotten even worse this year, with wells drying, fields lying fallow, and most dramatically, the land actually sinking up to a foot a year as the water underneath it gets sucked dry.

Over 95 percent of the state is in a “severe drought” according to the latest data from the U.S. Drought Monitor — and 100 percent of the state has been in at least a “moderate” drought for the last three months.

In the rural San Joaquin Valley, hundreds of residents ran out of tap water as the drought dried up the flow of the Tule River which normally provides the area with water. Wells dried up and the county had to deliver bottled water supplies to affected residents last week — supplies that are meant to last only three weeks.

Separately, the legislature also passed a $7.5 billion water bond proposal to invest in improvements to California’s water infrastructure with a nearly unanimous vote. This will go on the November ballot.

Lawmakers also passed a statewide ban on free single-use plastic grocery bags. Stores will be able to charge customers ten cents per bag in order to cut down on unneeded usage that results in bags strewn across neighborhoods and along coastlines.


http://www.nationofchange.org/drought-stricken-california-makes-historic-move-regulate-underground-water-first-time-1409581749
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Re: Water crisis in the Colorado Basin

Postby Griffon64 » Tue Sep 09, 2014 7:33 am

So long overdue it is not even funny.
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Re: Water crisis in the Colorado Basin

Postby portia » Tue Sep 09, 2014 8:18 am

Yes, I agree.
I hope some of the local management plans will address When the water is used. Watering with sprayers that spray well into the air, at noon, is nonsense. Timers and scheduling of watering can mean there will not be so much lost to evaporation.

Although the rainfall from 2013-2014 was apparently the lowest in 163 years, there is no way to tell if we are in a megadrought, as yearly rainfall varies so much. Here, in the mountains, we already had restrictions, such as time of day and day of week watering, and buy-back of turf lawns. ( I am also seeing a lot more fake lawns. They look too perfect.)

But the biggest user of water is agriculture--about 80%-- So, they need to think about what crops they grow and how they are watered.
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Re: Water issues

Postby Cerin » Tue Sep 30, 2014 10:15 am

I've changed the title of the thread to 'water issues', to accommodate water developments in other states. This article reports on a West Virginia plan to allow fracking under the Ohio River, which supplies water to 3 million people. Beyond the dangers-to-the-water-supply issue, there is the tricky business of one state taking action to benefit itself, that could harm the residents of a different state (excerpt):

Think Progress wrote:Nine citizen and environmental groups are urging West Virginia Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin to reconsider his plans to let companies drill for oil and natural gas underneath the Ohio River, citing concerns that drilling and fracking could contaminate the drinking water supply and increase the risk of earthquakes in the region.

In a letter sent to the governor this month, the coalition of Ohio- and West Virginia-based groups said Tomblin’s Department of Environmental Protection has not proved that it can adequately protect the Ohio River, which supplies drinking water to more than 3 million people. The groups cited drilling currently taking place in a state-designated wildlife area, which some have complained is unacceptably disrupting the nature preserve, and a chemical spill in January that tainted the drinking water supply for 300,000 people.

“The well-documented deficient enforcement capability of the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection’s Office of Oil and Gas has been on public display for years,” the letter reads. “How are we ever to believe that the state has the political will, technical capability and community commitment to guarantee that adequate controls, timely supervision and, when needed, ruthless enforcement would occur on well pads that close to the Ohio River?”



http://readersupportednews.org/news-section2/312-16/26150-west-virginia-plans-to-frack-beneath-ohio-river-which-supplies-drinking-water-to-millions
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Re: Water issues

Postby oldtoby » Tue Sep 30, 2014 5:24 pm

Good to know WV wasn't satisfied with just contaminating Charlestons water supply, now their going for multiple states water supplies? Way to aim high!!!
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Re: Water issues

Postby Cerin » Thu Oct 09, 2014 3:50 pm

How stupid are we?

(excerpt)
Center for Biological Diversity wrote:Billions of Gallons of Fracking Waste Contaminate Drought-Ravaged California's Aquifers

Almost 3 billion gallons of oil industry wastewater have been illegally dumped into central California aquifers that supply drinking water and farming irrigation, according to state documents obtained by the Center for Biological Diversity. The wastewater entered the aquifers through at least nine injection disposal wells used by the oil industry to dispose of waste contaminated with fracking fluids and other pollutants.

The documents also reveal that Central Valley Water Board testing found high levels of arsenic, thallium and nitrates — contaminants sometimes found in oil industry wastewater — in water-supply wells near these waste-disposal operations.

“Clean water is one of California’s most crucial resources, and these documents make it clear that state regulators have utterly failed to protect our water from oil industry pollution,” said Hollin Kretzmann, a Center attorney. “Much more testing is needed to gauge the full extent of water pollution and the threat to public health. But Governor Brown should move quickly to halt fracking to ward off a surge in oil industry wastewater that California simply isn’t prepared to dispose of safely.”

The state’s Water Board confirmed beyond doubt that at least nine wastewater disposal wells have been injecting waste into aquifers that contain high-quality water that is supposed to be protected under federal and state law.


http://readersupportednews.org/news-sec ... s-aquifers
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Re: Water issues

Postby portia » Wed Oct 15, 2014 9:16 am

While I was out with the dog this AM, I saw the local "dredge" out with its equipment. I hope it was opening a larger opening from our swim beach to the lake. (The swim Beach is a beach/and water playground that makes it unnecessary for swimmers to go out in the lake) If here is no water circulation (due to low lake water) then the swim beach cannot be used. It is closed for the season, now, but now is the time to do maintenance for next year. Live and hope.

WILL THE EAST COAST PLEASE PAY ATTENTION AND SEND SOME OF THAT RAIN TO US!!!
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Re: Water issues

Postby Jnyusa » Wed Oct 15, 2014 9:56 am

If I could put it in a box and mail it to you, I would. :(

We've had the wettest year imaginable. Our yard is submerged; I've got water damage in my home; and commuting in thunderstorms every other day is a major pain in the wazoo. Why is all the water on this end of the continent?
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Re: Water issues

Postby portia » Fri Oct 17, 2014 9:43 am

Yes. Every time I listen, a storm is coming your way.
My son's yard has a distinct slope downward, so I asked him if there was a drain of any sort at the bottom. (If not, he'd have a swimming pool). He said there was, and it drained to a storm drain under the street. That is something, anyway, but he is probably breeding mosquitos).


(I hate to complain about our really remarkably wonderful weather,{*} but we DO NEED RAIN.)


{ *} Highs in the 60S AND 70S F, Lows in the high 30s and it has been this way for months. We didn't get as high as 90s F again, this year)
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Re: Water issues

Postby portia » Sat Nov 01, 2014 9:00 am

OK, it is raining. Not much, yet, but we can hope, and it may turn to snow, later. There is lots of wind. Many people here take a lot of trouble to rake up their pine needles, mIne just blow away!

The best news is that this is a "winter storm". That is the front comes down from the north and brings cold air. So, the pattern has changed.
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Re: Water issues

Postby Griffon64 » Sat Nov 01, 2014 11:49 am

We got a bit of rain, too. First we had a mighty windstorm, turning the air brown around 9pm, and then thunder! which we get very rarely, and finally, some rain. Beautiful rain.

Hopefully, at least a normal winter rainfall-wise will get underway.
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Re: Water issues

Postby portia » Fri Dec 19, 2014 10:04 am

Ca is at east double what we normally get in December. GOODY. But don't relax yet, as we have had years with one month of rain, before. But it is still nice and the trees are very happy.
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Re: Water issues

Postby Jnyusa » Sat Dec 20, 2014 11:56 am

When does El Nino begin? That tends to heat up the west coast, doesn't it?

(Not to be pessimistic! I'm glad you guys are finally getting rain. We still have plenty here that you can borrow, and lots of cloud cover every day. I can hardly remember what sunshine looked like.)
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Re: Water issues

Postby portia » Mon Dec 22, 2014 9:27 am

El Nino can be amorphous, but I think it is usually more apparent in Jan and Feb.

Yes, I get reports about the rain on the East Coast. My son is driving from MD to VT on Tues. Luckily in a 4-wheel drive car, but I am glad I am at home.
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Re: Water issues

Postby Cerin » Sat Jul 04, 2015 9:58 am

I wonder how many people know that California produce is being irrigated with waste water from oil companies? The water tests positive for carcinogens. Do they get into the plants?

drought stricken california farmers forced to use oil firms waste water on crops
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