Favorite/most important philosophers

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Favorite/most important philosophers

Postby Billobob » Fri Mar 27, 2015 12:17 pm

This is Actual Philosophy. I've been looking around and it seems like the council of Manwë is mainly politics, not philosophy so I've decided to shake that up. As the title implies, list your 5 favorite Philosphers/philosophies then the five most important philosophies/Philosphers in your opinion. Please no religions/religious leaders in your list, just philosophy. I'm not planning on participating in this except to keep us on topic.
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Re: Favorite/most important philosophers

Postby Jnyusa » Fri Mar 27, 2015 7:26 pm

I'll play, at least for a short break from creating assignments that will make my students cry. =:) Might not be able to sustain this conversation for very long

Jean-Paul Sartre (1905-1980 CE, French): the greatest philosopher of the 20th century; creator of the only fully developed ontology post-Enlightenment; among 19th and 20th century philosophers his was the broadest and deepest comprehension of the philosophers who went before him.

Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900 CE, German): purely for his boning-knife sense of humor; my favorite philosopher to read over breakfast; candidate for the most misinterpreted and thus most maligned philosopher of all time; runs a close second to Sartre, I think, in depth of comprehension of what went before, but not in breadth.

Marcus Aurelius (121-180 CE, Roman): not for his anal philosophy but for his monetary reforms which saved Rome's bacon for a little while, at least, when the 'barbarians' began to invade; first person in history to grasp the antecedents and consequences of inflation.

Aristotle (384-322 BCE, Greek): father of empiricism, his place in the stars is secured; reputed to be mischievous and young at heart, collected frogs in the pond and shells at the beach, loads more fun than Plato; the challenge with Aristotle is scraping away all the crud the Scholastic philosophers piled on top of him.

Heraclitus of Ephesus (535-475 BCE, Greek): because you really can't step into the same river once; inexplicably anticipated quantum theory.

Lao Tze (604-531 BCE, Chinese): a philosophy of triumph by yielding, mastery of the self by obedience to the ways of the universe; my favorite philosopher to read over and over again

That's six, but these are people whose works I do tend to revisit every few years. There are so many others, of course, whose contributions are brilliant and influential, but I think that of the philosophers named above, Sartre, Aristotle, and Lao Tze have something like meta-status in the extent to which they reshaped philosophy for all time. The other three are simply ones that I'm fond of for various personal reasons.
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Re: Favorite/most important philosophers

Postby MerriadocBrandybuck » Mon Mar 30, 2015 5:51 am

What Jny said, plus I would add Peter Singer
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Re: Favorite/most important philosophers

Postby Portia1 » Sun Apr 05, 2015 8:53 am

Well. . .
Having just read two of his books, I think I need to add Robert Anson Heinlein.

"TANSTAAFL"
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Re: Favorite/most important philosophers

Postby Old_Begonia » Sun Apr 05, 2015 9:11 am

**crickets chirping**

I got nuthin. Well, except for my Mom, maybe. We were not the best of friends, but she was a shrewd observer and I learned a lot from her and her example.
"And it is said by the Eldar that in water there lives yet the echo of the Music of the Ainur more than in any substance else that is in this Earth; and many of the Children of Ilúvatar hearken still unsated to the voices of the Sea, and yet know not for what they listen."

There is something profound about standing AT sea level.
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Re: Favorite/most important philosophers

Postby Storyteller » Sun Apr 05, 2015 10:49 am

Billobob wrote: Please no religions/religious leaders in your list.

Why not? I happen to consider Ecclesiastes to be a profound philosophical work.

I'm not planning on participating in this except to keep us on topic.

Again, why not? Do you find it more fun to poke the ant hill and watch the ants swarm?
"...Their aim in war with Germany is nothing more, nothing less than extermination of Hitlerism... There is absolutely no justification for this kind of war. The ideology of Hitlerism, just like any other ideological system, can be accepted or rejected, this is a matter of political views. But everyone grasps, that an ideology can not be exterminated by force, must not be finished off with a war.” - Vyacheslav Molotov, ""On the Foreign Policy of the Soviet Union", 31 October 1939
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Re: Favorite/most important philosophers

Postby Billobob » Mon Apr 13, 2015 8:53 am

Storyteller wrote:
Why not? I happen to consider Ecclesiastes to be a profound philosophical work.


Because I do not want this discussion into a debate of religion vs. Atheism etc.




Storyteller wrote
Again, why not? Do you find it more fun to poke the ant hill and watch the ants swarm?


No it's because I do not beleive I am qualified for this kind of discussion.
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Re: Favorite/most important philosophers

Postby Old_Begonia » Mon Apr 13, 2015 10:18 am

Storyteller wrote
Again, why not? Do you find it more fun to poke the ant hill and watch the ants swarm?


No it's because I do not beleive I am qualified for this kind of discussion.[/quote]

ehh...hey, you and I are neither of us as qualified as some others here, but we both have our philosophies, and they came from somewhere. My mom probably studied philosophy in high school, because she grew up in a time when Greek, Latin, and calculus were part of the curriculum. Me? I couldn't even get anyone to teach me Latin. Hence, I got nuthin. Still, I learned. I can't quote anything but cogito ergo sum. Still, my mom taught me to call ponus poopus when I smell it. I think that's all philosophy is anyway.
"And it is said by the Eldar that in water there lives yet the echo of the Music of the Ainur more than in any substance else that is in this Earth; and many of the Children of Ilúvatar hearken still unsated to the voices of the Sea, and yet know not for what they listen."

There is something profound about standing AT sea level.
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Re: Favorite/most important philosophers

Postby Jnyusa » Fri Apr 17, 2015 8:03 am

MerriadocB wrote:... plus I would add Peter Singer


I've not read any of his books, Merry, but they're on my list!

Funny, when billobob asked the question I automatically thought of dead philosophers, but there are a few living philosophers who have influenced me a lot. Foremost is probably James Carse at NYU. Then there's a whole bunch of social philosophers in the socialist school, like Murray Bookchin, whom I've sampled but never read in depth and really feel that their ideas deserve some study because they are part of the deep structure of the social sciences.

Importing a topic from another thread ... what's wrong with science! A big downside to science right now is that it is so specialized and the mechanics of it take so long to learn that we never get around to studying the philosophical underpinnings of our fields. But the context from which a theory emerged is as important as the equations in it, and context is most often embedded in some social philosophy that belonged to a particular age, a particular stage in our social evolution. It's not irrelevant to understanding the boundaries of a theory.
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