When is a Christmas Tree no longer a Christmas Tree?

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Postby Aravar » Tue Dec 13, 2005 9:52 am

It doesn't begin with an X it begins with the Greek letter Chi (Ch) which looks like an X
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Postby GlassHouse » Tue Dec 13, 2005 10:10 am

thanks Aravar, :)

so it should be pronounced Chi-mas? :roll:

what do you say we call the whole thing off... :P
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Postby Tuor, » Tue Dec 13, 2005 10:28 am

Tuor, do you see all the non-Christian trappings of Christmas as un-Christian?


Yes I do

Does that make them undesirable


Not at all. I don't believe Christmas is a Godly holiday. It is a tradition of Man which has worked its way into the 'Christian world'.

For me, Christmas is a totally secular holiday. It is a time for kids to go to sleep excited because Santa will soon be there to give them presents.
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Postby Blackwood » Tue Dec 13, 2005 12:47 pm

gwynhvar wrote: That makes it seem to me that "holiday" tree is much more appropriate, as the word has no specifically Christian content and is thus more inclusive of all citizens.

"Holiday" originally meant "holy day", so it arguably carries some religious connotations too, though (even) less than does Christmas.

Aravar wrote:It doesn't begin with an X it begins with the Greek letter Chi (Ch) which looks like an X


The Greek font is available, so you can say χmas if you like.
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Postby Tuor, » Tue Dec 13, 2005 1:04 pm

Blackwood wrote:"Holiday" originally meant "holy day", so it arguably carries some religious connotations too, though (even) less than does Christmas.


This reminds me of something, up until this year I always thought "Happy Holidays" was perfectly fine since it was simply wishing a person "Merry Christmas" and "Happy New Years" at the same time. :)
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Postby Minardil » Tue Dec 13, 2005 1:43 pm

That makes it seem to me that "holiday" tree is much more appropriate, as the word has no specifically Christian content and is thus more inclusive of all citizens.



And if the faithful adherents of other religions followed the tradition of setting up a brightly lit and decorated fir tree in their living rooms over the midwinter holidays celebrated by their own faiths, that might make sense, but since Jews don't put up trees at Hannakuh, and since Muslims don't put up trees during Eid (even when it falls in the Winter), and since trees aren't part of Kwaanzaa (which strictly speaking isn't a "religious" holiday anyway, as many African Americans who follow this new custom are also fairly devout Christians), I don't see what the point is in calling a Christmas tree a "holiday tree".

And I have yet to meet anyone of any faith, or lack thereof, who has ever been genuinely offended at being wished "Merry Christmas". I actually LIKE the saying "Happy Holidays", not only because it is all inclusive, but also because I like the simple alliteration, but that doesn't mean that I can feel too much sympathy for people who get their knickers in a twist over being wished a faith-specific greeting. They should take such a greeting in the spirit in which it is intended. Really, if I was in a majority Muslim country during Eid* and was wished offered some seasonally appropriated greetings by well wishers there, I certainly wouldn't be OFFENDED by it. I imagine that if I WAS offended, and I came on this board and beyotched about how those culturally imperialist Muslims were displaying such shocking insensitivity to my non-Muslimness by saying "Joyous Eid" to me, many of those on this thread currently arguing against "Merry Christmas" would sound off about what an asshat I was.






The feast which marks the end of the fasting month of Ramadan, but which due to the Muslim Lunar calendar migrates through our Gregorian year
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Postby Harvestar » Tue Dec 13, 2005 1:47 pm

There was an opinion piece in my paper today which I thought y'all might enjoy.

Let's give the holidays back to the pagans
My opinion Andrew M. Greeley

A long time ago, a very wise teen told me she thought it was a shame Christmas came during the holidays. She had a point.
I've often thought that the ancient church made a mistake when it tried to convert the Roman feast of the Saturnalia (or Lupercalia as it was also called) into the celebration of the birthday of Jesus. It didn't quite work.
In Britain, for example, from Charles Dickens' "A Christmas Carol" to Dylan Thomas' "A Child's Christmas in Wales," there is not the slightest mention of Jesus.
When I watch folks pummel one another as they fight their way toward Wal-Mart's bargains, I'm not sure all that much is left of Bethlehem and the Holy Family and the angels and the shepherds and the magi — nor of the love for one another that Christmas should sustain.
Neither do the frantic and frenetic efforts to accomplish the required shopping and the ill tempers and sensitive egos of the feast day itself render much honor to the Light of the World.
So maybe we should move the birthday of Jesus out of the holidays and celebrate it with the Festival of the Magi on Jan. 6 as did the Greeks in the church of long ago. Then we solve the problem of what to say this time of the year. Having given the holidays back to the pagans, we could wish one another a "Festive Lupercalia" or even a "Fertile Saturnalia."
The tree could revert to its old pagan title of the Tannenbaum, the sacred fir tree of the Teutonic tribes, the passionate tree that unites heaven and Earth in love and brings down the warm spring rains necessary for life to continue on this planet.
Crypto Christians could content themselves with the secret that the birth of Jesus did unite Earth and heaven and that the lights represent the Light of the World and the fruits (ornaments on the tree) represent ourselves, the spiritual offspring of the love between Earth and heaven.
As long as we keep that a secret, neither the secularists (who don't like religion at this time of the year) nor the "Christians" (who would think fertility symbols to be obscene idolatry) will mind at all.
The current president, a Christian, could hardly mind. A born-again Christian he might be, yet his holiday card is totally irreligious.
The Madonna Christmas stamp would have to go, however. It almost disappeared during the Clinton administration when a bureaucrat at the Postal Service decided it was not politically correct.
The (Jewish) mother of Jesus and her (Jewish) child survived on a stamp only because of direct presidential intervention.
I can't be serious, you say? Well, no. Nonetheless, I find the controversy about Christmas and the holidays unedifying and creepy.
The sneaky tricks of the politically correct to remove Christ from the holidays are doomed to failure. There are many more evangelical Christmas shoppers and voters than there are secularists.
Logically, Christmas is a politically incorrect festival that causes embarrassment to those Americans who are not Christian (though not to Islamic shoppers because for them Jesus is the greatest of the prophets before Muhammad and his birthday deserves to be celebrated). But Christmas is an intricate element in American culture and cannot be extirpated.
The last such attempt was made by the New England Puritans who forbade it by law.
School attendance on Dec. 25 was required in Massachusetts until the 1880s, and Thanksgiving was designated the late autumn festival to replace the popish idolatry of Christmas.
The papists responded, as they usually do, by enthusiastically celebrating both feasts.
The gift exchange at Christmas — however often blighted by human weakness — represents the intense love that should flourish this time of the year. The darkness-turning-into-light spirit of the season would be best reflected by respect for the traditions of others, majority and minority.
Those of us who know what all the symbols mean will keep our secrets to ourselves.


The Rev. Andrew M. Greeley, a Catholic priest, teaches at the University of Chicago and the University of Arizona. Contact him at agreel@aol.com.
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Postby Tuor, » Tue Dec 13, 2005 1:59 pm

Harvestar,

While reading that article I was reminded of the idea of giving US land back to the native Americans. Yet I've often wondered what group of native Americans were killed in order for the new group to control the area. In the same way, I wonder if there was some other celebration which a dominant people replaced with Saturnalia.
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Postby wntrmute » Tue Dec 13, 2005 5:52 pm

Minardil wrote:
That makes it seem to me that "holiday" tree is much more appropriate, as the word has no specifically Christian content and is thus more inclusive of all citizens.



And if the faithful adherents of other religions followed the tradition of setting up a brightly lit and decorated fir tree in their living rooms over the midwinter holidays celebrated by their own faiths, that might make sense, but since Jews don't put up trees at Hannakuh, and since Muslims don't put up trees during Eid (even when it falls in the Winter), and since trees aren't part of Kwaanzaa (which strictly speaking isn't a "religious" holiday anyway, as many African Americans who follow this new custom are also fairly devout Christians), I don't see what the point is in calling a Christmas tree a "holiday tree".

And I have yet to meet anyone of any faith, or lack thereof, who has ever been genuinely offended at being wished "Merry Christmas". I actually LIKE the saying "Happy Holidays", not only because it is all inclusive, but also because I like the simple alliteration, but that doesn't mean that I can feel too much sympathy for people who get their knickers in a twist over being wished a faith-specific greeting. They should take such a greeting in the spirit in which it is intended. Really, if I was in a majority Muslim country during Eid* and was wished offered some seasonally appropriated greetings by well wishers there, I certainly wouldn't be OFFENDED by it. I imagine that if I WAS offended, and I came on this board and beyotched about how those culturally imperialist Muslims were displaying such shocking insensitivity to my non-Muslimness by saying "Joyous Eid" to me, many of those on this thread currently arguing against "Merry Christmas" would sound off about what an asshat I was.






The feast which marks the end of the fasting month of Ramadan, but which due to the Muslim Lunar calendar migrates through our Gregorian year

I said Ramadan Mubarak to my Muslim co-worker, but I'm no Muslim. He looked all excited when I said "La illaha illa Allah" at one point, but seemed to expect that I would say more. But he was happy that I had effectively wished him a happy holiday, and that was enough.

Also, I figured you would have the traditional plain aluminum pole.
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Postby gwynhvar » Tue Dec 13, 2005 6:19 pm

Minardil wrote:
That makes it seem to me that "holiday" tree is much more appropriate, as the word has no specifically Christian content and is thus more inclusive of all citizens.


And if the faithful adherents of other religions followed the tradition of setting up a brightly lit and decorated fir tree in their living rooms over the midwinter holidays celebrated by their own faiths, that might make sense, but since Jews don't put up trees at Hannakuh, and since Muslims don't put up trees during Eid (even when it falls in the Winter), and since trees aren't part of Kwaanzaa (which strictly speaking isn't a "religious" holiday anyway, as many African Americans who follow this new custom are also fairly devout Christians), I don't see what the point is in calling a Christmas tree a "holiday tree".


On the Capitol grounds, the point would be that we are a Nation of diverse Faiths and none, and that our Government should not be promoting one over another. If the tree is not, as some here have argued it is, so disassociated from the Christian holiday as to have no religious meaning, then there should be no tree on the Capitol Grounds - anymore than a huge Menorah should adorn the grounds.

Minardil wrote:And I have yet to meet anyone of any faith, or lack thereof, who has ever been genuinely offended at being wished "Merry Christmas".


As a very young woman (35+ years ago and long before the term "politically correct" was heard) moving from an homogenous to a very cosmopolitan and diverse area, I was gently taught by non-Christian citizens of immense kindness, goodwill, and impeccable manners that "merry christmas" was not a universally appropriate greeting. Not that long ago, under great stress leaving a Dr.'s office, I distractedly reverted to "have a merry christmas." I was gently but firmly informed by the Dr. that he would be celebrating a holiday, and he kindly hoped that my holiday would be a happy one too. He did not celebrate Christmas.

Minardil wrote: I actually LIKE the saying "Happy Holidays", not only because it is all inclusive, but also because I like the simple alliteration...


I like it too, and it avoids an unwarranted assumption that everyone belongs to the majority Faith. This is important, I think, because there is a power differential at work. After all, Hanukah, Ramadan, etc., are not official holidays. That Christmas is one is a result of those days when "diversity" would have meant differences among Christian sects (the First Peoples and those like Chinese immigrants were, of course, not taken into account or consulted - they had no power).

Since Christmas - a Christian "holy day" - is a National Holiday by long standing tradition, it becomes more important that official acts by the secular Government reflect an inclusiveness of all Faiths and none, and do not promote the majority Christian faith.

Minardil wrote: but that doesn't mean that I can feel too much sympathy for people who get their knickers in a twist over being wished a faith-specific greeting. They should take such a greeting in the spirit in which it is intended. Really, if I was in a majority Muslim country during Eid* and was wished offered some seasonally appropriated greetings by well wishers there, I certainly wouldn't be OFFENDED by it. I imagine that if I WAS offended, and I came on this board and beyotched about how those culturally imperialist Muslims were displaying such shocking insensitivity to my non-Muslimness by saying "Joyous Eid" to me, many of those on this thread currently arguing against "Merry Christmas" would sound off about what an asshat I was.


Of course, if you are a guest in a foreign Country it is boorish to take offense at the customs of your hosts. But we are not talking about Foreign visitors, but about the acts of a Secular Govrernment in a diverse Nation and how inclusive that Government is of its' many and varied citizens.

Today there was a peevish letter to the editor in my local paper by a woman offended by being greeted by "happy holidays" at the Mall. "We still have the right to say "merry christmas" she huffed. Well, of course she has the right. She's an individual citizen and no one is passing any laws compelling her to use "happy holidays."

There is no law compelling retailers to say "happy holidays." They are simply interested in making as many people as possible feel like spending money.

The real agenda of the fanatic fundamentalists is aptly illustrated by their outrage at any "official" use of "happy holidays" instead of "merry christmas" - even by a secular government. They simply cannot tolerate that any legitimacy should be given to any traditions and beliefs but their own - even when that implicitly conferred legitimacy in no way detracts from their own - Christmas, after all, being a "holiday."
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Postby Iorlas » Tue Dec 13, 2005 6:56 pm

Min, you basically summed up my feelings on the matter as well.

gwynhavr wrote:On the Capitol grounds, the point would be that we are a Nation of diverse Faiths and none, and that our Government should not be promoting one over another. If the tree is not, as some here have argued it is, so disassociated from the Christian holiday as to have no religious meaning, then there should be no tree on the Capitol Grounds - anymore than a huge Menorah should adorn the grounds.


I agree that if the government has to call a Christmas tree a "holiday" tree, they shouldn't even put one up at all. But if they do put one up, don't call it something that it isn't. All the political correctness in the world is not going to make a decorated tree symbolic of Hannukah, Ramadan, Kwanza (whatever the hell that is), or New Years. It is associated with Christmas, and changing the official name is not going to change that.
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Postby Minardil » Wed Dec 14, 2005 9:19 am

On the Capitol grounds, the point would be that we are a Nation of diverse Faiths and none, and that our Government should not be promoting one over another.


Oh, I agree with that wholeheartedly, and if we were talking about school prayer or teaching creationism or anything of that nature, I'd be one of the loudest critics.

But setting up a Christmas Tree is not a religious act, since decorated aboreal displays are entirely secular, if not positively pagan, which has already been pointed out. I'm not opposed to changing the name of the national Tree to "Holiday Tree" on religioius grounds. I'm opposed to it because I think doing so would be incredibly pointless and stupid.

And I don't have any problem, btw, with seeing "huge Menorah's" as part of public holiday displays either. We have several on our town square right now, kind of arranged in with the Nativity Scene and some mounted on lampposts alongside the moravian stars etc. And I see no reason to call them anything other than Menorah's. I like menorahs. I imagine I would hate "carnival candelabra's".
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Postby Ethel » Wed Dec 14, 2005 9:39 am

Minardil wrote:But setting up a Christmas Tree is not a religious act, since decorated aboreal displays are entirely secular, if not positively pagan, which has already been pointed out. I'm not opposed to changing the name of the national Tree to "Holiday Tree" on religioius grounds. I'm opposed to it because I think doing so would be incredibly pointless and stupid.


I'm opposed to calling it a "holiday tree" on linguistic grounds. Specific and concrete language is always better than generic and vague. Those green things with lights and baubles you see people putting up around the winter solstice? They are Christmas trees, so that's what we should call them.

Would we call a menorah a "holiday candelabra"?
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Postby DrStrangelove » Wed Dec 14, 2005 9:50 am

Ethel wrote:I'm opposed to calling it a "holiday tree" on linguistic grounds. Specific and concrete language is always better than generic and vague. Those green things with lights and baubles you see people putting up around the winter solstice? They are Christmas trees, so that's what we should call them.


Very much my opinion. It's called a Christmas Tree thanks to history and there's no more reason to try and change it because of the allusion to Jesus than there is to change the name "Easter" because of its allusion to a pagan goddess or the days of the week because of other pagan deities or even July and August because of a pair of Roman dictators.
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Postby Iorlas » Wed Dec 14, 2005 10:10 am

Well, it looks like we four are all in agreement.
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Postby Minardil » Wed Dec 14, 2005 10:13 am

Also, I figured you would have the traditional plain aluminum pole.


Well, I used to have the traditional plain aluminum pole, but I bent it into a pretzel a couple of years ago during the Feats of Strength, and now I'm too old, fat, weak, and lazy to bend it back.
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Postby JewelSong » Wed Dec 14, 2005 10:34 am

DrStrangelove wrote:change... the days of the week because of other pagan deities or even July and August because of a pair of Roman dictators.


Well, Quakers have done this...and still do, in some Meetings.

Instead of the Roman names of the week, you will see "First Day, Second Day"...and so on in official Quaker documents, minutes to business meetings and on letters and etc. And ditto for the months: First Month, Second Month and so on.

It seems affected, but when I was part of a very vital Quaker meeting, that was how everyone referred to days and months so you got used to it and it seemed normal...at least in Quaker-related circles!
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Postby portia » Wed Dec 14, 2005 11:53 am

I am fascinated by how the decision of the Catholic Church to co-opt a pagan festival and set Christ's birth in December has influenced other thinking.

I am in a choir that will be singing the carol "In the Bleak Midwinter" ("In the bleak midwinter, frosty wind made moan. Earth stood hard as iron, water like a stone. Snow had fallen, snow on snow, snow on snow. In the bleak midwinter, long long ago. . . ").

I can't help thinking how ridiculous it is to describe a birth, at any time of the year, in Bethlehem, in such terms.

I am sure that all sorts of "lessons" have been drawn, over the years, about a being born in the winter, etc., etc. when any dunce would be able to figure out that it was not very cold and probbly not in the winter.

What symbols "mean" is often arbitrary and individual with the person. The Supreme Court thinks a tree is a secular symbol, but I do not agree. It is still specifically associated with "Christmas" and I would prefer that if the government sets one up, the association be diluted as far as possible by calling it a "holiday" tree.


Good article by Greeley, but I lke just about everything he writes.
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Postby GlassHouse » Thu Dec 15, 2005 1:05 am

former Fox News producer on Fox's "war on Christmas"

From CHARLIE REINA, former Fox News Channel producer:

As with many conflicts, particularly the manufactured kind, dishonesty, greed and ignorance are the culprits behind Fox News Channel's so-called “War on Christmas.” But their enabler, as Dr. Phil might call it, is that well-intended but wholly misguided scourge of society -- political correctness. Rather than promoting tolerance, inclusion and understanding, as advertised, p/c has had the opposite effect. It has made us not a freer society, but one of timid, tongue-tied slaves to convention who substitute glib code words for the more difficult task of actually treating each other with respect. It’s the kind of shortcut that sooner or later circles back to bite you.

But first let’s look at what political correctness is, and is not, in this context. Wishing your customers or co-workers, “Happy holidays,” isn’t p/c; it’s common sense. Try saying, “Merry Christmas, happy Hannukah, a joyous Kwanzaa and a prosperous New Year” every time you leave the office, and before long they won’t let you back in. But taking something that’s recognized everywhere – by people of all religious beliefs -- as a Christmas tree and renaming it a “holiday tree” is political correctness, pure and simple. It adds nothing, reaches out to no one. It’s as offensive as it would be to call a Menorah a “festive candelabra,” or Santa Claus “Jolly old Good-guy Nick.” Granted, as a cause for war, this holiday p/c is no Pearl Harbor. But in its own naïve way, it provides the warmongers with just the ammunition they want.

It’s no surprise, of course, that this phony call to arms, this “Christmas (ergo, Christians) Under Attack” hysteria, emanates from the bowels of Fox News Channel. The network is, after all, ground zero in the culture wars that polarize so much of America these days. Make no mistake about it: Fox is on a mission. Its slogans say, “Fair and Balanced” and “We Report, You Decide.” But in the six years that I worked there, what I heard most from Fox management were mission statements – about turning things around, taking news back from the liberals, and giving “middle America” a voice long denied it by the “east coast media elite.” In other words, using its news report to bring about change -- in the media and, ultimately, in the direction of American culture.

As FNC’s man at the top, Roger Ailes, knows well from his years as a political operative, there is no more effective wartime strategy than to divide and conquer. That’s why so much of his network’s programming is confrontational. The “us against them” gambit animates not only FNC’s night-time entertainment shows, like “The O’Reilly Factor” and “Hannity & Colmes,” but the network’s daytime “news” report, where anchors regularly browbeat guests who are on the wrong (Democrat or liberal) side of issues

But what really separates Fox from the competition is its unabashed use of religion as a divisive weapon. Common sense -- and common courtesy -- have long dictated that personal religious beliefs be kept out of news reporting unless the story at hand involves religion. But on Fox, it’s not uncommon for an anchor to raise the issue of a guest’s religion, or lack thereof, a’ propos of nothing. The most glaring example I can recall is a 2002 interview with a guest who had been cited for his charitable acts. At the end of the discussion the anchor said (paraphrasing here), “So I understand you’re an atheist.” The guest acknowledged that this was so. “Well,” said he anchor, “we’re out of time now, but I’d be glad to debate you anytime on the existence of God,” and, with that, ended the segment.

/CONTINUED BELOW

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Postby Almatolmen » Thu Dec 22, 2005 11:56 am

I can't believe that I'm contributing to this 'tempest in a teapot' thread again, but...

I want to ask who has the true P.C. agenda: thousands of individuals and businesses who independently decide among "Season's Greetings,' 'Happy Holidays,' and 'Merry Christmas (and Happy New Year),' or rotate them for reasons that seem good and sufficient to them or those who threaten economic boycotts and lawsuits by an army of lawyers if they do not use the politically correct greeting?

As a boy I sold greeting cards (with the bulk of the orders coming at Christmas) door-to-door. In the 1960s B.P.C (Before Political Correctness) cards with 'Happy Holidays' and 'Season's Greetings' were as popular as 'Merry Christmas (and Happy New Year)'. And there was a mixture of usage between Christmas tree and Yule tree.

For at least the first 250 years of Christianity, only Pesach (and many languages still use words derived from the Hebrew for Passover) was celebrated. In the earliest days the celebration coincided with the Jewish holiday (don't forget the earliest Christians were Jews). Later (about the fifth century), to distance themselves from the Jews, Gentile Christians urged a formula that disallowed the celebrations being co-incident and requiring a Sunday celebration of the resurrection. They didn't celebrate the birth of Christ, not only because they apparently didn't know the date, but because first century Jews did not celebrate birthdays at all. Later( again about the fifth century) Gentile believers wished to adopt their custom of celebrating birthdays. Early Christians speculated that Jesus' birth occurred all over the calendar: April, May, August, September, etc. As others have noted, Saturnalia was chosen for various reasons. One thing now one else has mentioned is that many Romans identified the Hebrew YHWH, also called El, with the other pagan Semitic Els (all called Ancients of Days), which were further equated with the Greek Xronos and their own Saturn (just as they also equated Jupiter with the Germanic Odin).

I once read a very convincing book by a evangelical author for placing the birthdate of Jesus to coincide with Rosh Hoshanah (New Year's), generally in September, for reasons Scriptural, astronomical, and symbolic. After all, in Jewish tradition, it also marks the date of the first day of Creation. And shortly afterward, Yom Kippur calls for Atonement. It would be my preference.

Like many of the radical English Protestants, Quakers liked to return to the earliest Scriptural precedents, so they rejected Christmas as unScriptural and pagan. Likewise they rejected the pagan day names and used the practice of the first chapters of Genesis and simply numbered them. Similar arguments regarding month names. The exceptions were September-December, because these were already number names and still accurate since the civil year stated in March. Modern Friends number all the months.
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Postby Apostasy » Thu Dec 22, 2005 2:11 pm

John Gibson of Fox News recently had an on-air breakdown
http://www.crooksandliars.com/2005/12/21.html#a6426
http://www.thecarpetbaggerreport.com/archives/6155.html

when it got pointed out that most of the examples in his "War on Christmas" book were out and out fabrications.
http://www.au.org/site/PageServer?pagen ... xmas_tales

Then, after theatening to sue on air and shutting off the mike....

"Gibson said, "Don't come in where I drink… Don't come visit a bar when I'm in there." After Rob asked if Gibson was threatening him, Gibson hung up on him."

What class acts these guys are!
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Postby wntrmute » Fri Dec 23, 2005 3:32 pm

HAPPY FESTIVUS!!!!!!!!!

The tradition of Festivus begins with the airing of grievances. I got a lot of problems with you people! And now you're gonna hear about it!


Well, you could just review my previous year's worth of posts.
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Postby Tuor, » Tue Dec 27, 2005 11:35 am

"Tempest in a Tea Pot" is a good way of describing the straw man that I suppose was inevitable considering the actual topic and political slant of so many in this fourm.
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Re: When is a Christmas Tree no longer a Christmas Tree?

Postby Minardil » Mon Dec 15, 2014 11:29 am

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I couldn't agree more. Especially the bit about the "embittered seesaw". I know if I were a plank of wood constantly being tipped back and forth on a fulcrum by schoolkids, I'd feel embittered too.

Testify, totally nonsensical bot poster! Testify!
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Re: When is a Christmas Tree no longer a Christmas Tree?

Postby Jnyusa » Mon Dec 15, 2014 12:16 pm

I'm guessing the moderators are wise to ElmiraSn and Frankiefus because they've spammed all over the website, but I'm betting that Manwe is the only forum that received a naked pic of StellaPek. Would someone emails the mods to remove all these posts? My verizon mail is temporarily down and I don't want to email from my work account. Thanks you, whomever!
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Re: When is a Christmas Tree no longer a Christmas Tree?

Postby GlassHouse » Mon Dec 15, 2014 12:43 pm

Not a complete loss. I enjoyed reading through the old thread.
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Re: When is a Christmas Tree no longer a Christmas Tree?

Postby White Shadow » Mon Dec 15, 2014 2:51 pm

Jnyusa wrote:I'm guessing the moderators are wise to ElmiraSn and Frankiefus because they've spammed all over the website, but I'm betting that Manwe is the only forum that received a naked pic of StellaPek. Would someone emails the mods to remove all these posts? My verizon mail is temporarily down and I don't want to email from my work account. Thanks you, whomever!


Sadly, no, there were naked pics of StellaPek everywhere - Manwe didnt' get special treatment!

We're working very hard to get everything deleted and banning people as fast as we can. No need to email - we are very much aware of the spate of spammers. Thank you for the reporting - please continue to use the report button, as it helps us identify the posts that are hidden in threads (as opposed to the ones where the spammer is the last poster).

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Re: When is a Christmas Tree no longer a Christmas Tree?

Postby Jnyusa » Thu Dec 18, 2014 1:14 pm

Thank you!
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Re: When is a Christmas Tree no longer a Christmas Tree?

Postby Cock-Robin » Fri Jan 02, 2015 2:32 am

I, too, have nothing but contempt for this fictional "War on Christmas." As a cashier, I have had people scream at me to say "Merry Christmas," when there was nothing merry about it. I have made a blog on it on another board:

http://www.sparkpeople.com/mypage_publi ... id=5836404

Anyway, nobody squawked in 1942 when Bing Crosby sang "Happy Holiday" in that immortal movie "Holiday Inn."

It's taking all the merriment out of Christmas that really disturbs me.
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Re: When is a Christmas Tree no longer a Christmas Tree?

Postby Jnyusa » Wed Jan 07, 2015 9:02 pm

Yeah, the holidays seem to be one of the most stressful times of the year for lots of people. Makes you wonder ...
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