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Postby sleeping raki » Mon Apr 02, 2012 3:11 am

hi,
could you translate this sentence for me please

i am the master of my fate, i am the captain of my soul

thanks
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Re: translation

Postby Xandarien » Mon Apr 02, 2012 4:16 am

sleeping raki wrote:hi,
could you translate this sentence for me please

i am the master of my fate, i am the captain of my soul

thanks


[Im i / N'i] cherdir od i amarth nîn
I am the master of my fate

[Im i / N'i] [chîr/gaun] od i fëa nîn
I am the _____ of my soul

Okay...onto the explanations and the choices (the words in brackets).

[Im i / N'i] They both mean I am, but in a subtly different way. Im means 'I, myself', it is the emphatic pronoun, 'I am a woman'.
Ni is the normal 'I am', 'I am a woman'. (The 'i' part is the word the).

In the second sentence, the choice of [chîr/chaun] comes about because there is no direct word for captain, so I came up with a couple of alternatives.
(c)hîr = lord, g(c)aun = prince.

od = of
i amarth nîn = my fate
i fëa nîn = my soul
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Postby Xandarien » Mon Apr 02, 2012 4:37 am

For rockstrxiii

"Life is uncertain, death is not."

Cuil ú-beniad, da ngurth peniad

This isn't word for word I'm afraid, it actually reads back as
'Life is not fixed, but death is fixed'. It's because of a couple of things, 1) There's no word for 'certain' so I can't do a direct negation, and 2) the two negations (UN certain and 'is NOT').

So, as there's no word for certain, I went for a synonym, 'fixed'. (If something is certain, it is fixed.) Because I then had to make a negation to make it 'not fixed', the sentence wouldn't have made sense if I'd then written 'death is not' so I had to rewrite the sentence slightly.
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Postby rockstrxiii » Wed Apr 04, 2012 9:49 pm

And what if it was something like
"life is not guaranteed, death is"

and thank you very much! it is well appreciated :)
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Postby Tamuril23 » Thu Apr 05, 2012 7:06 am

Looking for "Defy gravity" to be translated please :)
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Postby Xandarien » Thu Apr 05, 2012 8:46 am

rockstrxiii wrote:And what if it was something like
"life is not guaranteed, death is"

and thank you very much! it is well appreciated :)


No word for 'guarantee' either I'm afraid. Or for 'pledge', or 'promise', and beyond that you lose the meaning of the sentence again, hence I went for 'to fix'. :)
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Postby Xandarien » Thu Apr 05, 2012 8:53 am

Tamuril23 wrote:Looking for "Defy gravity" to be translated please :)


Unsurprisingly, there's no word for 'gravity' (it being a modern concept and all), so the best I can offer you is:

Maetho dannad

Which means 'Fight falling'. (There is also no direct verb 'to defy' I'm afraid! :(, I checked the synonyms 'contend' 'dispute' and 'resist'.

You could also have

Dagro dannad

which means 'Battle falling' (as in the verb 'to battle')
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Postby tina_k » Fri Apr 13, 2012 6:21 pm

As I posted in the Quenya thread, I was wondering if I could have a phrase translated in Sindarin as well.

The phrase is

memoirs of a hidden soul



Thank you so much in advance!
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Postby Xandarien » Sat Apr 14, 2012 2:23 am

tina_k wrote:As I posted in the Quenya thread, I was wondering if I could have a phrase translated in Sindarin as well.

The phrase is

memoirs of a hidden soul

Thank you so much in advance!


[Gobennas/Rínais] od fëa [dholen/thurin]

There's no direct word for 'memoir', so you have a choice between brackets:
Gobennas = History
Rínais = Memories
as memoirs can mean both of those things (is it a written memoir, a history, or is it a personal memoir, a memory).

Second choice between brackets:
Dolen = Concealed, hidden
Thurin = Secret, hidden. Subtle difference!

And the other words meanings:
od = of
fëa = a soul
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Postby tina_k » Sat Apr 14, 2012 11:18 am

Xandarien wrote:
tina_k wrote:As I posted in the Quenya thread, I was wondering if I could have a phrase translated in Sindarin as well.

The phrase is

memoirs of a hidden soul

Thank you so much in advance!


[Gobennas/Rínais] od fëa [dholen/thurin]

There's no direct word for 'memoir', so you have a choice between brackets:
Gobennas = History
Rínais = Memories
as memoirs can mean both of those things (is it a written memoir, a history, or is it a personal memoir, a memory).

Second choice between brackets:
Dolen = Concealed, hidden
Thurin = Secret, hidden. Subtle difference!

And the other words meanings:
od = of
fëa = a soul


Thank you for your reply :)

I was thinking memoirs more along the lines of confessions (autobiography) .

I guess if there is not a word for that then history would do best as memories is not what I was looking for :/
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Postby Xandarien » Sat Apr 14, 2012 11:39 am

tina_k wrote:I was thinking memoirs more along the lines of confessions (autobiography) .


No one word, no, but you could have something like

Narn o guil = Tale about life (as in a saga)
Trenarn o guil = Account about life (this may be more what you are looking for as the tre- prefix denotes 'seeing something through to its end', i.e the whole tale about life)

Is that any help?
Last edited by Xandarien on Thu Apr 19, 2012 4:29 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Xandarien » Thu Apr 19, 2012 4:26 am

imlaurennichole wrote:I know there is no definite word for rebel in a quenya translation, but how far off would the sindarin translation be, if there is one at all. I'm trying to learn but am in beginning "baby step" phase so it is much appreciated. Also would you be able to translate "she's a wolf" and " beautiful disaster" or "beautiful mess" ? I am looking for the sindarin translations, i know its a lot so thank you so much


She is a wolf:

Te dhraug
Te 'araf
E draug
E garaf


Te = She is (nominative pronoun). 'She is a wolf.'
E = She is (emphatic). 'She is a wolf.'
Sindarin has two words for wolf, draug and garaf, and there isn't really a discernible difference between them, they both have negative connotations (remember wolves in Middle Earth are evil).

Well, there are no words for 'disaster' or 'mess', so I ran through the synonyms.

Dagnir vain = Beautiful bane (as in 'you are the bane of my existence')
Naergon vain = Beautiful woeful lament
Manadh vain = Beautiful fortune/doom
Amarth vain = Beautiful fate

Are any of those any use?

As for 'rebel', hmm. There is a way of saying 'to defy', but I can't think of it at the moment, so I shall post this and come back to you.

Edit - Ah I remember what it was, I was looking for a verb 'to defy' for another translation, and ended up wondering about using a negation.

For your purposes however, what about:

ú-vŷr = literally, 'not follower'

I was going to use the word aphadon = follower, and then realised it means more 'Men' as in 'the followers of the Elves, the second born', so that wouldn't really work.
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Postby imlaurennichole » Thu Apr 19, 2012 11:26 am

Xandarien wrote:
imlaurennichole wrote:I know there is no definite word for rebel in a quenya translation, but how far off would the sindarin translation be, if there is one at all. I'm trying to learn but am in beginning "baby step" phase so it is much appreciated. Also would you be able to translate "she's a wolf" and " beautiful disaster" or "beautiful mess" ? I am looking for the sindarin translations, i know its a lot so thank you so much


She is a wolf:

Te dhraug
Te 'araf
E draug
E garaf


Te = She is (nominative pronoun). 'She is a wolf.'
E = She is (emphatic). 'She is a wolf.'
Sindarin has two words for wolf, draug and garaf, and there isn't really a discernible difference between them, they both have negative connotations (remember wolves in Middle Earth are evil).

Well, there are no words for 'disaster' or 'mess', so I ran through the synonyms.

Dagnir vain = Beautiful bane (as in 'you are the bane of my existence')
Naergon vain = Beautiful woeful lament
Manadh vain = Beautiful fortune/doom
Amarth vain = Beautiful fate

Are any of those any use?

As for 'rebel', hmm. There is a way of saying 'to defy', but I can't think of it at the moment, so I shall post this and come back to you.

Edit - Ah I remember what it was, I was looking for a verb 'to defy' for another translation, and ended up wondering about using a negation.

For your purposes however, what about:

ú-vŷr = literally, 'not follower'

I was going to use the word aphadon = follower, and then realised it means more 'Men' as in 'the followers of the Elves, the second born', so that wouldn't really work.



Thank you very much, actually 'not follower' seems to work better than rebel...

E draug seems about what i was getting so i like that thank you again (:
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Postby elise197 » Sat Apr 21, 2012 1:54 pm

Hi,

I was wondering if you were able to translate the following for me as we are looking to have these words etched onto our wedding bands in Tengwar font, but, as yet, we haven't decided on the language we want them in.

LIFEMATE

BELOVED OF MY SOUL

LOVE

TRUST

ONE RING TO SHOW OUR LOVE - ONE RING TO BIND US - ONE RING TO SEAL OUR LOVE - AND FOREVER TO ENTWINE US

Thanks
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Postby Xandarien » Sat Apr 21, 2012 3:07 pm

elise197 wrote:Hi,

I was wondering if you were able to translate the following for me as we are looking to have these words etched onto our wedding bands in Tengwar font, but, as yet, we haven't decided on the language we want them in.

LIFEMATE

BELOVED OF MY SOUL

LOVE

TRUST

ONE RING TO SHOW OUR LOVE - ONE RING TO BIND US - ONE RING TO SEAL OUR LOVE - AND FOREVER TO ENTWINE US

Thanks


I'll post you the first single words now, and translate the sentence tomorrow after I've slept!

There's no word for lifemate, but there is 'lover':
Melethron = Male lover
Melethril = Female lover

Meleth = Love
Estel = Trust, in a hopeful sense

[Ro-vell/Ro-vuin] od i fëa nîn = Dearest of my soul
Mell and Muin both mean 'dear', with the Ro- it makes it 'dearest', there's no word for 'beloved' I'm afraid.
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Postby Xandarien » Sun Apr 22, 2012 2:30 am

By the way, this sentence is the same one my husband and I have on our wedding rings :) so it's quite a close one to my own heart.

Min corf an gened i veleth vîn
Min corf men an 'wedhed
Min corf a noded i veleth vîn
Adh an-uir men an riged


Which says:
One ring for seeing our love
One ring to bind us
One ring to tie our love
And forever to entwine us

Which given Sindarin is pretty close word for word!
Onto the explanations:
There is no verb for 'to show' or one for 'to seal', so I've used 'to see' for the former. For the latter, Sindarin actually has two verbs for 'to bind', but one (gwedh-) has less literal connotations than the other (nod-). Gwedh means more 'to a person' whereas nod is 'to literally bind a person'.
I hope this is okay!

Oh, and vîn means 'us and not you' as there are two pronouns for 'us'! :)
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Postby elise197 » Sun Apr 22, 2012 2:49 am

Thanks Xandarien.

Out of interest, did you have the inscription on the inside or outside of your ring?
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Postby Xandarien » Sun Apr 22, 2012 2:53 am

Outside, in Tengwar, it was from a Cornish jewellers.
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Postby Marlie » Thu Apr 26, 2012 2:50 pm

Someone once sent me a Sindarin quote in tengwar calligraphy... But I can't find it anywhere. Can anyone help me, please?? The phrase was:

I will never let you fall
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Postby Xandarien » Fri Apr 27, 2012 3:33 am

Marlie wrote:Someone once sent me a Sindarin quote in tengwar calligraphy... But I can't find it anywhere. Can anyone help me, please?? The phrase was:

I will never let you fall


ú-ui dhefitha [dannol/dannog]

Dannol = You, formal, someone you don't know well
Dannog = You, informal, someone you know well

Defitha = I will let
ú-ui = Never

I'm not entirely sure of the sentence order if I'm honest (it's a rare happenstance). In this construction it says 'Never I will let you fall'.

I'm still weighing up whether you could equally write

ú-ui dhefitha [le/gi] dhannad
I will never let you fall (le = you, formal, gi = you, informal.)

Which makes the sentence structure a lot easier as it detaches the pronoun from the verb for the word 'you', making the object easier to work out. Anyway. Both are equally valid, pick which one you prefer.
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Help?

Postby Linwë Tinúviel » Fri Apr 27, 2012 12:58 pm

Hello, i just joined up because i heard this was a great place to get something translated. Would someone translate my name into sindarin? I really want to get a tattoo next year and im hoping that someone can help me.

Kethry (Keth re)
Willow
Larsen
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Postby Marlie » Fri Apr 27, 2012 1:30 pm

Xandarien wrote:
Marlie wrote:Someone once sent me a Sindarin quote in tengwar calligraphy... But I can't find it anywhere. Can anyone help me, please?? The phrase was:

I will never let you fall


ú-ui dhefitha [dannol/dannog]

Dannol = You, formal, someone you don't know well
Dannog = You, informal, someone you know well

Defitha = I will let
ú-ui = Never

I'm not entirely sure of the sentence order if I'm honest (it's a rare happenstance). In this construction it says 'Never I will let you fall'.

I'm still weighing up whether you could equally write

ú-ui dhefitha [le/gi] dhannad
I will never let you fall (le = you, formal, gi = you, informal.)

Which makes the sentence structure a lot easier as it detaches the pronoun from the verb for the word 'you', making the object easier to work out. Anyway. Both are equally valid, pick which one you prefer.



Thank you so much:)
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Re: Help?

Postby Xandarien » Fri Apr 27, 2012 2:25 pm

Linwë Tinúviel wrote:Hello, i just joined up because i heard this was a great place to get something translated. Would someone translate my name into sindarin? I really want to get a tattoo next year and im hoping that someone can help me.

Kethry (Keth re)
Willow
Larsen


I can translate the meaning of the names into Sindarin for you, certainly. Could you tell me whether they are male or female first of all :)
I can't actually find a meaning for 'Kethry', do you know its meaning? Larsen just seems to be 'son of lars', with the meaning of 'Lars' seeming to be 'crowned with laurel'. Is that right?
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Postby Linwë Tinúviel » Fri Apr 27, 2012 2:30 pm

They are female. But sadly i asked my mother, Kethry has no meaning behind it, it is the name of her favorite book character :cry2: As for Larsen, yes you are correct, it is my fathers name. My mothers is Langerlan which if memory serves is dutch for long road... does any of this help?
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Postby Xandarien » Sat Apr 28, 2012 4:05 am

Yip that helps, gender is the most important thing - Sindarin is a brilliant language for names, there are so many ways of putting them together!

Okay, first of all -

Willow:
Tathareth
Tatharel
Tatharil


These are all just female suffixes, there's no meaning difference between them. Then we have:

Tatharhel = Willow daughter or
Tatharwen = Willow maiden


Right, next up -
Larsen (I went with the meaning I found, but Sindarin doesn't have a word for 'laurel' so I just used 'leaf'):

Lathrion = Crowned leaf
Lathridir = Crowned leaf man


You didn't say you wanted it done, but your mother's name would be:
Menanneth
Menannel
Menannil

:)

As I can't find the name Kethry anywhere except in the books by Mercedes Lackey I can't translate it for you, but you could still have the English changed directly into Tengwar if it is for a tattoo?
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Thanks

Postby Linwë Tinúviel » Sat Apr 28, 2012 7:37 am

Thank you! And yes, i will try to get Kethry directly translated to Tengwar later this afternoon.
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Postby tina_k » Sat Apr 28, 2012 11:15 am

Xandarien wrote:
tina_k wrote:I was thinking memoirs more along the lines of confessions (autobiography) .


No one word, no, but you could have something like

Narn o guil = Tale about life (as in a saga)
Trenarn o guil = Account about life (this may be more what you are looking for as the tre- prefix denotes 'seeing something through to its end', i.e the whole tale about life)

Is that any help?


Sorry for the late reply, got hang on uni work!

But how would those link to the rest of the sentence?
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Postby Xandarien » Sat Apr 28, 2012 11:51 am

tina_k wrote:
Xandarien wrote:
tina_k wrote:I was thinking memoirs more along the lines of confessions (autobiography) .


No one word, no, but you could have something like

Narn o guil = Tale about life (as in a saga)
Trenarn o guil = Account about life (this may be more what you are looking for as the tre- prefix denotes 'seeing something through to its end', i.e the whole tale about life)

Is that any help?


Sorry for the late reply, got hang on uni work!

But how would those link to the rest of the sentence?


Ah yes, sorry.

Narn-o-guil od fëa [dholen/thurin]
or
Trenarn-o-guil od fëa [dholen/thurin]

Linking it like this shows that it is meant to be one concept, so
"Tale-of-life of a hidden soul"/"Account-of-life of a hidden soul"
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Postby Xandarien » Mon Apr 30, 2012 3:51 am

maddy1 wrote:Hey,

I was hoping you could translate "The wise speak only of what they know" into Sindarin for me. I was hoping to get this as a tattoo in Tengwar scripture, and am asking around on multiple forums to make sure I don't get something completely random by accident.

Thanks!


Well, you will probably get more than one different answer, as different people approach Sindarin, and Neo-Sindarin differently.

My translation however is:

[i ngelydh / i ngelwyn] er-bedir o van istar

The choice at the start is:
i ngelydh = The Noldor (literally 'the wise folk') or
i ngelwyn = The wise (just the adjective 'wise')
er-bedir = er- is a prefix meaning 'alone' (there is no word for only) pedir (lenited to bedir) = they speak
o = about
van = what (man, lenited)
istar = they know
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Postby starsnocturnelle » Mon Apr 30, 2012 4:59 am

Hi :)

Could you please translate these 2 phrases into Sindarin please :)

1) Don't dream your life, Live your dreams.

2) In darkness a light can be found. Lift your eyes and see the stars.

Big thank you in advance :)
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