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thankyou!

Postby hailaliah » Wed Dec 28, 2011 1:38 am

Thank you so much! So to get the Tengwar script would I have to post the sindarin translations on the other forum?
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Re: thankyou!

Postby Xandarien » Wed Dec 28, 2011 3:16 am

hailaliah wrote:Thank you so much! So to get the Tengwar script would I have to post the sindarin translations on the other forum?


Yip, ask for them to be transcribed in the Transcription thread here.

http://forums.theonering.com/viewtopic. ... start=1950
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Re: Translation

Postby Xandarien » Wed Dec 28, 2011 3:30 am

berg_88 wrote:Hello I'm new to all of this,

Could I please have these two words translated into Sindarin,

"Hearty"

"Bergess"

I've been trying to work on the translations myself but i wanted to make sure they were right.

Thank you for taking the time to do this.


Do you mean 'Burgess' as in 'a freeman of a borough'? Or the surname (meaning the same thing from what I can see)?

Hearty:
Right...there is a suffix that turns a word from the noun form into a 'like x' form (for example: like silver = silvery).

There are two words for heart, and tbh I'm not sure which is more appropriate, so I'll do them both.

Húnren = Hearty (in the physical sense)
Gúrren = Hearty (in the moral sense)

Gúrren looks a little odd, but Gûren means 'my heart' so it needs to differentiate.
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Postby berg_88 » Wed Dec 28, 2011 5:43 am

Sorry my fault I should have made that clear,

Yes Bergess is a surname.

Hearty is a surname as well if that makes any difference to what you have already done.

Thanks again.
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Postby Xandarien » Wed Dec 28, 2011 7:26 am

berg_88 wrote:Sorry my fault I should have made that clear,

Yes Bergess is a surname.

Hearty is a surname as well if that makes any difference to what you have already done.

Thanks again.


Okay, so if we're going with the meaning of your surname as 'freeman of a borough' then I can offer you:

Laindîr e-drann

Laindîr = Freeman (Compounded as a name)
e = of the
drann = administrative district (literally, The Shire, but it has other meanings that are identical to the meaning of the word borough)

Edit - Hmm, I found another meaning of Bergess as 'Dweller in the birch-trees' from Old English, which would be:

Dorthor min mrethil

Dortha- (to dwell) +-or = Dweller (without a gender)
min = in the
mrethil = birch trees

Are either of those any good to you? :)
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Postby berg_88 » Thu Dec 29, 2011 4:17 pm

Yes thank you! The top one was more of what I was looking for from the translation.

Loving all the work you're doing, it's really good.

Thank you for that.
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Postby Xandarien » Fri Dec 30, 2011 4:29 am

Thanks! :) You're very welcome.
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Postby nooij » Tue Jan 03, 2012 2:03 pm

Hello people,

I was hoping someone might want to translate a certain text to Sindarin. It is for non-commercial linguistic research, so it will not be published online. ;) It'd be highly appreciated. The text is:

,,When I was five years old, my mother always told me that happiness was the key of life. When I went to school, they asked me what I wanted to be when I grew up. I wrote down "happy". They told me I didn't understand the assignment and I told them they didn't understand life."

Many thanks in advance!!
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Postby Xandarien » Wed Jan 04, 2012 3:36 am

nooij wrote:Hello people,

I was hoping someone might want to translate a certain text to Sindarin. It is for non-commercial linguistic research, so it will not be published online. ;) It'd be highly appreciated. The text is:

,,When I was five years old, my mother always told me that happiness was the key of life. When I went to school, they asked me what I wanted to be when I grew up. I wrote down "happy". They told me I didn't understand the assignment and I told them they didn't understand life."

Many thanks in advance!!


Ir nónen leben idhrinn, [nana/naneth] nîn ui nin bent i ['ess/'lass] naun i ened od guil.
Ir minnen i adab-an-istad, pennir annin man anírol no ir am 'alol.
Teithon dad '['ell/'lass]'.
Pennir annin i ú-istassen i dass a bedin andin i ú-istar cuil.


Which back into English reads:
When I was five years, my mummy/mother always told me that joy was the core of life.
When I entered the 'place to learn', they said to me what do you want to be when you grow up.
I wrote down 'joy'.
They said to me that I did not know the task and I said to them that they did not know life.

Explanations:
Nana/Naneth = Nana is 'mummy', Naneth is 'mother', pick which one suits the sentence better for you.
There is no word for happy, but there are two words for joy: 'ell and 'lass.
Please note that the apostrophe here is part of the word (it's due to mutation), so if you still want the part "I wrote down 'happy'" in inverted commas, you do need both apostrophes, like this: ''ell'
Pick which one you prefer the look of, as there is no difference in meaning.
There is no verb for 'to ask' so I rewrote the tense slightly, but it retains the same meaning.
There is obviously no word for school, so I made one up that means 'building-for-learning'.
There is also no word in Sindarin for 'key', so I used a synonym.

Edit - I was just reading the Quenyan translation, and I must confess the idea of 'not young' for 'when I grow up' hadn't occurred to me! (*slap wrist*). It does sound more Elven, and they are quite right, the verb 'gala-' has connotations with plantlife, not people. In which case, the end of the sentence would read:

ir l'ú-neth = when you are not young
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Postby nooij » Sat Jan 07, 2012 4:07 pm

I am so sorry for this late reply, I had very busy days and little time to browse the internet unfortunately. :(

Thank you so much for this beautiful translation. It's very useful and very educative. Especially the multiple options and the informative explanations are very useful. I really appreciate all of your efforts.

I wish you a great weekend!! :)
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questions for the curious

Postby maddiel33 » Sat Jan 14, 2012 1:52 pm

Hi there!! I was wondering if you could translate the english phrase into sandarin, "never a failure always a lesson"? im also very curious , about all of this elvish language. for translating and putting into script, is it recommended that it is changed into an elvish language from english, like putting english into sindarin or quenya and then into tengwar? please i am fascinated with this and would love to gain some of your knowledge. Thank you!!!
-Maddie :)
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Re: questions for the curious

Postby Xandarien » Sat Jan 14, 2012 3:23 pm

maddiel33 wrote:Hi there!! I was wondering if you could translate the english phrase into sandarin, "never a failure always a lesson"? im also very curious , about all of this elvish language. for translating and putting into script, is it recommended that it is changed into an elvish language from english, like putting english into sindarin or quenya and then into tengwar? please i am fascinated with this and would love to gain some of your knowledge. Thank you!!!
-Maddie :)


Due to the constraints of Sindarin (mainly vocabulary), I had to rewrite your sentences slightly to get them to fit the language:

ú-ui ú-dûr, ui nad sinnen

Which reads in English as:
Never a 'not victory' (i.e. failure), always something learned

There is no direct word for failure, so I did a negation, and there is no word for lesson (I briefly debated making one based on existing rules, but it would have been identical to an already existing verb form, so I discounted this and just slightly rewrote the sentence, the meaning is essentially the same).

Well, Tolkien did write Tengwar (the Elven script) varieties to specifically work with his own languages, Quenya and Sindarin, but you can transcribe English equally well (as well as some other languages, ask Isildilme in the transcription thread!) so I wouldn't say either is 'recommended' as such, it's more personal preference, whether you'd rather have a Sindarin or Quenyan translation, or just directly from the original language (English, French etc.)
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Postby maddiel33 » Sat Jan 14, 2012 8:46 pm

okay that is great thank you, is sindarin more limited than quenya? sorry for all the questions!!! also what is i love you in both of those? id love to know where to find a great translator for english to sindarin or quenya~ thanks!!-M :)
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Postby maddiel33 » Sat Jan 14, 2012 11:07 pm

and also i was wondering if there was a sindarin word for "unless?" thatd be great...thank you!!
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Postby Xandarien » Sun Jan 15, 2012 3:45 am

maddiel33 wrote:okay that is great thank you, is sindarin more limited than quenya? sorry for all the questions!!! also what is i love you in both of those? id love to know where to find a great translator for english to sindarin or quenya~ thanks!!-M :)


Some people say Sindarin is more limited, it certainly has less vocabulary, but all the rules exist to make up most of the words that aren't attested.

[Le/Ci] melin = I love you

Le = you (formal)
Ci = you (informal, someone you know well)

or if you want it in Doriathrin Sindarin (as I don't know what you want this for or who the speaker is), it would be:

Dhe melin

As far as Quenyan goes, I don't actually know the language, you need the Official Quenyan thread for that I'm afraid.
You won't find a decent translator on the Internet that isn't a real person, it's not something you can code.
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Postby Xandarien » Sun Jan 15, 2012 3:49 am

maddiel33 wrote:and also i was wondering if there was a sindarin word for "unless?" thatd be great...thank you!!


Not directly, no, it's not a preposition used in Sindarin.

The closest you get is the word (n)dan which is the preposition 'but/against/yet'
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Postby maddiel33 » Sun Jan 15, 2012 11:56 am

alright thank you so much for your help!!!~
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Postby jahki » Fri Jan 20, 2012 11:05 am

Hi I would like to get the following names translated into Sindarin:

Hayden Matthew

Kian Joshua

Thanks!
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Postby Xandarien » Fri Jan 20, 2012 12:44 pm

jahki wrote:Hi I would like to get the following names translated into Sindarin:

Hayden Matthew

Kian Joshua

Thanks!


Yip certainly, but can I confirm with you first that these are the meanings of the names that you're happy with?

Hayden = Only thing I can find is 'heathen'
Matthew = Gift of god
Kian = Ancient
Joshua = God rescues
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Postby jahki » Fri Jan 20, 2012 1:28 pm

Yes those are fine, except for Hayden the meaning I found when I named him was from the valley of hay.. or from the hay downs.. either of those would be a little better than heathen..:) Thanks.
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Postby Xandarien » Fri Jan 20, 2012 4:18 pm

Haha yes indeed, sorry about that! (I did think it was a rather odd meaning).

Righty-ho, I've done a few versions for each as there's many different ways of making names:

Matthew = Gift of god
Eruandor
Eruandon
Eruandîr
Eruandben


Eru (god) + ant (gift) + suffixes
-or = genderless (gift of god)
-on = makes it male (he is a gift of god)
-dîr = 'man' (man that is a gift of god)
-ben = 'person, one' (i.e 'one who is a gift of god')

Kian = Ancient
Ioror
Ioron
Iordîr
Iorben


Iaur (ancient) + suffixes
N.B = an 'au' always becomes an 'o' in a compound
-or = Ancient one
-on = He who is ancient
-dîr = Man who is ancient
-ben = Person who is ancient

(if I'm having a special moment and this is in fact a female name feel free to poke me!)

Joshua = God rescues
Erudraithor
Erudraithon
Erudraithdîr
Erudraithben


Eru (god) + edraith (saving)
I checked the compound rules as I've never done two vowels next to each other - the second vowel does a disappearing act hence it's not Eruedraith (it just doesn't look right).
-or = God saving one
-on = He who is saved by god
-dîr = Man who is saved by god
-ben = Person who is saved by god

Hayden = Valley of Hay
Right, there's no word for 'hay' but there is a word for 'corn', so -

Iaunanor
Iaunanon
Iaunannîr
Iaunamben

or

Iauladhor
Iauladhon
Iauladhîr
Iauladben


Iau = Corn. Lad/Nan = Valley

Some of the endings on the options for this one are a little different due to compound rules (what happens when a 'd' follows an 'n' etc!)

Take your pick!
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Postby jahki » Fri Jan 20, 2012 4:32 pm

Awesome, thanks for the quick reply!
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Postby jaktens » Tue Jan 31, 2012 12:03 pm

Hi! could you translate these three words:
'survive' , 'be yourself' , 'dreamer'
for me please? thanks :)
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Postby Xandarien » Tue Jan 31, 2012 12:46 pm

jaktens wrote:Hi! could you translate these three words:
'survive' , 'be yourself' , 'dreamer'
for me please? thanks :)


Survive:
I've done three options for this one -

Brono
Bronad
Bronadui


Brono = 'to survive' - infinitive form of the verb
Bronad = 'surviving' - gerund form of the verb
Bronadui = Surviving (as an adjective, meaning to endure, last)

Be yourself:
Well, it's two words not one :wink: but it is:

No ech

No = be (as in the verb 'to be' NOT 'may it be')
ech = yourself, emphatic pronoun

Dreamer:

ólben

Literally this is 'dream person' (ôl = dream + pen = person, someone)
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Postby jaktens » Tue Jan 31, 2012 3:52 pm

Xandarien wrote:
jaktens wrote:Hi! could you translate these three words:
'survive' , 'be yourself' , 'dreamer'
for me please? thanks :)


Survive:
I've done three options for this one -

Brono
Bronad
Bronadui


Brono = 'to survive' - infinitive form of the verb
Bronad = 'surviving' - gerund form of the verb
Bronadui = Surviving (as an adjective, meaning to endure, last)

Be yourself:
Well, it's two words not one :wink: but it is:

No ech

No = be (as in the verb 'to be' NOT 'may it be')
ech = yourself, emphatic pronoun

Dreamer:

ólben

Literally this is 'dream person' (ôl = dream + pen = person, someone)


ehh im not sure which one that i have to use for 'survive'. i want it to mean a command, not an action. its like: survive! you know.. sorry for my teriible english :/
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Postby Xandarien » Wed Feb 01, 2012 7:19 am

jaktens wrote:
ehh im not sure which one that i have to use for 'survive'. i want it to mean a command, not an action. its like: survive! you know.. sorry for my teriible english :/


Brono

The imperative 'Survive!' is identical to the infinitive 'to survive' for nearly all verbs.
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Postby jaktens » Wed Feb 01, 2012 9:10 am

Xandarien wrote:
jaktens wrote:
ehh im not sure which one that i have to use for 'survive'. i want it to mean a command, not an action. its like: survive! you know.. sorry for my teriible english :/


Brono

The imperative 'Survive!' is identical to the infinitive 'to survive' for nearly all verbs.


ok, thanks so much!
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Postby Xandarien » Wed Feb 01, 2012 2:43 pm

For smcfarland
Can you transcribe the sindarin word for sister?

And if there is a word for little sister and big sister? Thanks alot!


Sister = Muinthel (technically this means 'dear sister', you can also use the word Thel but it doesn't have such a familial connotation)

Little sister = Nethig

Big sister = Well, there's no attested word for it...and there's no preposition that means 'bigger' so it'd end up being two words.

Now if you want it transcribed into Tengwar, you need to go here (and specify the language as Sindarin :) ) http://forums.theonering.com/viewtopic. ... &start=180

(Make sure to hit 'post a reply' not 'post a new topic')
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Postby trippinballz » Thu Feb 02, 2012 8:45 am

Could you translate two phrases for me please? Blood is thicker than water. And, my faith, my life. Thank you!!
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Postby Xandarien » Thu Feb 02, 2012 12:52 pm

trippinballz wrote:Could you translate two phrases for me please? Blood is thicker than water. And, my faith, my life. Thank you!!


Blood is thicker than water:

[Agar/Iâr/Sereg] sâf tûgas athan nen

There are three words for blood, pick which one you prefer.

For this one I've had to write it as a comparative phrase, and it reads in English as 'Blood has thickness beyond water' (technically I should have done it as 'Blood has thickness beyond the thickness of water' but I believe the meaning is maintained in the shorter version).

My faith, my life:

Bronwe nîn, cuil nîn

Nice and easy this one, it's word for word.
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